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Prescription Drugs

NEWS
April 28, 2005
WHY DO DRUG companies spend billions on direct-to-consumer advertising of prescription drugs when it's the doctors, not the patients, who write the prescriptions? An unconventional study published yesterday in The Journal of the American Medical Association gives a pretty clear answer. Researchers coached actors to visit doctors' offices with symptoms of specific mental health disorders. The pretend patients who asked for an antidepressant were far more likely to be diagnosed with a mental illness.
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BUSINESS
August 20, 1993
Rite Aid Corp. has sued a Baltimore company that directed thousands of people its way for prescription drugs, saying the company didn't pay the full bill after Rite Aid served its clients at a discount price.According to the lawsuit filed in U.S. District Court in Baltimore, Prescription Drugs Inc. failed to pay $929,756 for drugs sold by Rite Aid in Maryland since 1988. It said the company owner, William E. Allen, did not respond to letters and calls from Rite Aid demanding payment, and Rite Aid terminated its agreement to supply drugs to PDI clients in June.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | May 21, 2012
Marylanders spent $44.5 billion on personal health care in 2010 as costs in the state continued to outpace the nation, according to a new report. Spending on services including hospital care, prescription drugs and long-term care increased 3.5 percent compared to 2009, according to the report by The Maryland Health Care Commission. On average a Maryland resident spent $7,698 on healthcare in 2010, 9 percent higher than the national average of $7,066. The biggest chunk of money in Maryland was spent on hospital care, which accounted for one-third of spending.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | January 8, 2013
A Bel Air man was sentenced to more than 10 years in prison Tuesday after he pleaded guilty to selling prescription drugs on dozens of occasions, the U.S. Department of Justice announced. Ronnie Stocks, 34, pleaded guilty to conspiracy to distribute and possession with intent to distribute the drug Oxycodone. He was sentenced by a U.S. District court judge to 101/2 years in prison with three years of probation. Harford County detectives said Stocks had about three dozen customers and typically sold them drugs in amounts less than $100.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | January 15, 2013
Federal authorities announced Tuesday that they had cracked a large suburban Maryland drug organization, arresting 18 people and charging 15 of them with conspiracy to distribute more than a ton of marijuana. According to a federal grand jury indictment, the drug trafficking organization, primarily based in Anne Arundel County, also dealt in cocaine, prescription drugs, steroids and other drugs. Law enforcement officials said they seized at least 30 cars, 60 pounds of marijuana, $300,000 in cash and 35 guns in the investigation.
NEWS
By Boston Globe | September 11, 1992
Prices of the 20 most popular prescription drugs jumped 80 percent on average from 1984 to 1991, four times the general inflation rate for the period, according to a report that accuses drug companies of profiteering."
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 28, 2004
PHILADELPHIA - Federal officials in Philadelphia charged three pharmacists and two doctors yesterday with illegally selling hundreds of thousands of pills, including popular medications Prilosec, Celebrex and Prozac, that had been handed out as promotional free samples by drug companies. The samples were sold in retail pharmacies in Philadelphia and Montgomery County, Pa., federal prosecutors say. Four other individuals - two of them drug company representatives - were charged this year in federal court in Philadelphia with selling drug samples for cash.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | July 15, 2001
BOSTON - Think of this as old news. After all, the demographic has matured along with Dan, Tom and Peter. Advertisers now target an audience that has aged from Pop-Tarts to Vioxx, from the yellow submarine to the little purple pill. Yet sometimes even a senior media has its moment. Consider health-care coverage. Nightly news reports on the patients' bill of rights have been interrupted by words from a sponsor about heartburn and Nexium. Background pieces on rising health-care costs have been punctuated by pitches about aches, pains and Celebrex.
NEWS
November 26, 2008
As the nation's president-elect and incoming Congress mull a variety of fixes for the nation's ailing health care system, there's at least one relatively simple step that could be taken to make prescription drugs more affordable for hundreds of thousands of Marylanders. It requires only that the federal government give states the power to enable lower and middle-income families to buy prescription drugs at the same prices paid by the Medicaid program. It wouldn't cost taxpayers a dime but would make prescription drugs 40 percent to 45 percent more affordable for participants.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 20, 2000
In a case that could have broad impact on contraceptive coverage nationwide, Planned Parenthood filed a class-action lawsuit yesterday charging that a company whose health insurance plan covers most prescription drugs, but excludes contraceptives, is illegally discriminating against its female employees. "It's sex discrimination when male employees get their basic health care needs covered by insurance, but women are forced to pay for their own," said Gloria Feldt, president of Planned Parenthood Federation of America.
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