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Prescription Drugs

BUSINESS
August 20, 1993
Rite Aid Corp. has sued a Baltimore company that directed thousands of people its way for prescription drugs, saying the company didn't pay the full bill after Rite Aid served its clients at a discount price.According to the lawsuit filed in U.S. District Court in Baltimore, Prescription Drugs Inc. failed to pay $929,756 for drugs sold by Rite Aid in Maryland since 1988. It said the company owner, William E. Allen, did not respond to letters and calls from Rite Aid demanding payment, and Rite Aid terminated its agreement to supply drugs to PDI clients in June.
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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker and By Andrea K. Walker | January 6, 2014
National health care spending increased 3.7 percent to $2.8 trillion in 2012, continuing a four-year trend of slow growth, according to new federal data. Spending on health grew more slowly than gross domestic product, pushing the share of the economy devoted to health care down from 17.3 percent in 2011 to 17.2 percent last year, according to analysis by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services released in the January issue of Health Affairs. The declines reflect the continued impact of the past recession and reduction in Medicare payments to skilled nuring facilities.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | May 21, 2012
Marylanders spent $44.5 billion on personal health care in 2010 as costs in the state continued to outpace the nation, according to a new report. Spending on services including hospital care, prescription drugs and long-term care increased 3.5 percent compared to 2009, according to the report by The Maryland Health Care Commission. On average a Maryland resident spent $7,698 on healthcare in 2010, 9 percent higher than the national average of $7,066. The biggest chunk of money in Maryland was spent on hospital care, which accounted for one-third of spending.
NEWS
By Boston Globe | September 11, 1992
Prices of the 20 most popular prescription drugs jumped 80 percent on average from 1984 to 1991, four times the general inflation rate for the period, according to a report that accuses drug companies of profiteering."
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | July 15, 2001
BOSTON - Think of this as old news. After all, the demographic has matured along with Dan, Tom and Peter. Advertisers now target an audience that has aged from Pop-Tarts to Vioxx, from the yellow submarine to the little purple pill. Yet sometimes even a senior media has its moment. Consider health-care coverage. Nightly news reports on the patients' bill of rights have been interrupted by words from a sponsor about heartburn and Nexium. Background pieces on rising health-care costs have been punctuated by pitches about aches, pains and Celebrex.
NEWS
November 26, 2008
As the nation's president-elect and incoming Congress mull a variety of fixes for the nation's ailing health care system, there's at least one relatively simple step that could be taken to make prescription drugs more affordable for hundreds of thousands of Marylanders. It requires only that the federal government give states the power to enable lower and middle-income families to buy prescription drugs at the same prices paid by the Medicaid program. It wouldn't cost taxpayers a dime but would make prescription drugs 40 percent to 45 percent more affordable for participants.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 20, 2000
In a case that could have broad impact on contraceptive coverage nationwide, Planned Parenthood filed a class-action lawsuit yesterday charging that a company whose health insurance plan covers most prescription drugs, but excludes contraceptives, is illegally discriminating against its female employees. "It's sex discrimination when male employees get their basic health care needs covered by insurance, but women are forced to pay for their own," said Gloria Feldt, president of Planned Parenthood Federation of America.
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | August 5, 2001
For years, Virginia Garrett had depended on the prescription drug plan she received after retiring from her job. But when the company was sold and moved out of state, she suddenly found herself with no insurance. "All of a sudden, you go to the store and the pharmacist says your prescription plan is gone," said Garrett, president of the St. Jane Frances CASOS senior club in Riviera Beach. "And it hits you in the face, and then you don't know which way to turn." Garrett was able to find an insurance plan after a few months, with the help of state Sen. Philip C. Jimeno, a District 31 Democrat.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun; King Features Syndicate | April 8, 2001
Q. I've had high blood pressure since 1985 and have taken many drugs, including Vasotec, Maxzide and others. All of them have side effects such as dry mouth or hair loss, and none has been effective at getting my lower number below 90. About two years ago, I heard about taking garlic for blood pressure. I take two pills a day. For more than a year, my blood pressure has been around 135 / 80. I swear by garlic, even though the doctors say it's not very effective. A. Preliminary research in animals and humans suggests that garlic may have a modest effect, especially on diastolic blood pressure (the lower number)
EXPLORE
October 27, 2011
The next Nationwide Prescription Drug Take Back Day will be Saturday in Harford County. People can turn in prescription drugs from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the parking lot of the county government office building at 220 S. Main St. in Bel Air. The parking lot is at the corner of Business Route 1 (Baltimore Pike) and South Main Street. No questions will be asked when the medications are turned in. The event is sponsored by the Harford County Department of Community Services and its Office of Drug Control Policy.
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