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Prescription Drugs

HEALTH
Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2014
A database in Kentucky that has tracked potentially dangerous and addictive prescriptions dispensed in the state for the past 15 years has become a national model by helping significantly reduce so-called doctor-shopping for pain drugs. Federal data show the state has dropped from the second-highest abuser of prescription drugs such as OxyContin and Percocet to 31st. But what it and other states cannot show is that such programs cut down on overdose deaths from all legal and illegal drugs, a lesson not lost on Maryland as its joins every other state in launching its own prescription drug monitoring system.
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NEWS
By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,SUN STAFF | March 21, 2001
Responding to a "crisis" created by the rising cost of prescription drugs, the state Senate unanimously approved a bill yesterday that would earmark $20 million to expand programs offering free or discounted medications to senior citizens and the poor. Supporters said the legislation would allow the subsidy programs, which benefit fewer than 50,000 Marylanders now, to reach an additional 72,000 who lack prescription drug coverage. "We have a crisis in dealing with prescription drugs in this country," said Sen. Thomas L. Bromwell, a Baltimore County Democrat and a sponsor of the bill.
NEWS
December 7, 2012
Health officials still aren't certain what is causing the alarming uptick in heroin overdoses that has occurred across Maryland recently. But it would be especially disturbing if the trend turns out to be an unintended consequence of state efforts to crack down on prescription drug abuse and fraud. The concern is that people addicted to prescription drugs are now finding them harder to get, and as a result may be turning to illegal narcotics like heroin, which are cheap and relatively easy to obtain on the street but which pose even greater public health and safety risks.
NEWS
July 29, 1993
Man charged in sale of prescription drugsA Brooklyn Park man was charged with illegally selling prescription drugs after police searched his home late Wednesday.According to the police report, officers searched the home of James Franklin Crites, 51, in the 600 block of Biscay Ave. at 10:40 p.m. and seized illegal prescription pain killers and other drugs.Investigators said Mr. Crites sold the drugs to undercover officers shortly before the raid. He was also charged with possession of a controlled dangerous substance.
NEWS
April 7, 2001
FOR ALL THE right reasons, state lawmakers may take some unwise steps. They want to help seniors who are too poor to buy prescription drugs. But in doing so, they may be hurting Maryland druggists and committing the state to a program of immense proportions. Senators and delegates are trying to cobble together a bill that would help Medicare recipients, and those not quite poor enough to qualify for Medicare, obtain prescription drugs. A reluctant Gov. Parris N. Glendening put $6.5 million in his budget for this purpose.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 27, 2000
WASHINGTON - Riding a wave of success on his prescription-drug plan, Vice President Al Gore plans to dedicate all this next week to a cross-country discussion of health care issues and a comparison of his proposals with those of Gov. George W. Bush. Gore's advisers, who outlined the strategy in a conference call yesterday morning, said that prescription drugs had emerged as the "top issue," and that Gore had surged in the polls in part because he had dedicated so much time to the issue.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | February 27, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Deficiencies in the Food and Drug Administration's system of approving and monitoring over-the-counter drugs have left it with little data on the number and types of adverse reactions and virtually no system of obtaining any, according to a General Accounting Office study.The report, to be released today by a subcommittee of the House Small Business Committee, noted that some over-the-counter drugs were known to cause serious problems under some conditions. For example, aspirin can cause internal bleeding.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | February 4, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Leaders of a Senate panel are calling for more federal regulation of drug prices, citing a report that claimed the pharmaceutical industry had increased prices for the most frequently used prescription drugs last year by as much as five times the rate of inflation."
NEWS
April 28, 2005
WHY DO DRUG companies spend billions on direct-to-consumer advertising of prescription drugs when it's the doctors, not the patients, who write the prescriptions? An unconventional study published yesterday in The Journal of the American Medical Association gives a pretty clear answer. Researchers coached actors to visit doctors' offices with symptoms of specific mental health disorders. The pretend patients who asked for an antidepressant were far more likely to be diagnosed with a mental illness.
BUSINESS
August 20, 1993
Rite Aid Corp. has sued a Baltimore company that directed thousands of people its way for prescription drugs, saying the company didn't pay the full bill after Rite Aid served its clients at a discount price.According to the lawsuit filed in U.S. District Court in Baltimore, Prescription Drugs Inc. failed to pay $929,756 for drugs sold by Rite Aid in Maryland since 1988. It said the company owner, William E. Allen, did not respond to letters and calls from Rite Aid demanding payment, and Rite Aid terminated its agreement to supply drugs to PDI clients in June.
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