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Prescription Drugs

NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,SUN STAFF | March 7, 2004
People who drive high on illegal drugs have been a problem for years, but Maryland authorities are increasingly concerned about another highway danger: drivers who get behind the wheel while strung out on prescription medications. In Harford County, drivers impaired by prescription drugs dominate those arrested for "drugged driving" violations. In Baltimore County, heroin is the leading drug, but legal drugs -- from anti-depressants to powerful narcotics such as OxyContin -- are running a close second, authorities said.
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NEWS
By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,SUN STAFF | March 21, 2001
Responding to a "crisis" created by the rising cost of prescription drugs, the state Senate unanimously approved a bill yesterday that would earmark $20 million to expand programs offering free or discounted medications to senior citizens and the poor. Supporters said the legislation would allow the subsidy programs, which benefit fewer than 50,000 Marylanders now, to reach an additional 72,000 who lack prescription drug coverage. "We have a crisis in dealing with prescription drugs in this country," said Sen. Thomas L. Bromwell, a Baltimore County Democrat and a sponsor of the bill.
NEWS
July 29, 1993
Man charged in sale of prescription drugsA Brooklyn Park man was charged with illegally selling prescription drugs after police searched his home late Wednesday.According to the police report, officers searched the home of James Franklin Crites, 51, in the 600 block of Biscay Ave. at 10:40 p.m. and seized illegal prescription pain killers and other drugs.Investigators said Mr. Crites sold the drugs to undercover officers shortly before the raid. He was also charged with possession of a controlled dangerous substance.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 28, 2004
PHILADELPHIA - Federal officials in Philadelphia charged three pharmacists and two doctors yesterday with illegally selling hundreds of thousands of pills, including popular medications Prilosec, Celebrex and Prozac, that had been handed out as promotional free samples by drug companies. The samples were sold in retail pharmacies in Philadelphia and Montgomery County, Pa., federal prosecutors say. Four other individuals - two of them drug company representatives - were charged this year in federal court in Philadelphia with selling drug samples for cash.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | January 15, 2013
Federal authorities announced Tuesday that they had cracked a large suburban Maryland drug organization, arresting 18 people and charging 15 of them with conspiracy to distribute more than a ton of marijuana. According to a federal grand jury indictment, the drug trafficking organization, primarily based in Anne Arundel County, also dealt in cocaine, prescription drugs, steroids and other drugs. Law enforcement officials said they seized at least 30 cars, 60 pounds of marijuana, $300,000 in cash and 35 guns in the investigation.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | January 8, 2013
A Bel Air man was sentenced to more than 10 years in prison Tuesday after he pleaded guilty to selling prescription drugs on dozens of occasions, the U.S. Department of Justice announced. Ronnie Stocks, 34, pleaded guilty to conspiracy to distribute and possession with intent to distribute the drug Oxycodone. He was sentenced by a U.S. District court judge to 101/2 years in prison with three years of probation. Harford County detectives said Stocks had about three dozen customers and typically sold them drugs in amounts less than $100.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | December 8, 2011
State health officials took the unusual step Thursday of suspending the authority of a Salisbury pain doctor to write prescriptions for opiates, narcotics and all other controlled dangerous substances commonly used to treat pain. The officials said Dr. Brent R. Fox wasn't conducting thorough exams of patients and was prescribing drugs in amounts outside of the standards. They will consider a permanent revocation next week and have referred the case to the state Board of Physicians for investigation of his right to practice medicine.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | October 16, 2013
A Towson gynecologist has been temporarily barred from practicing medicine after a state and federal investigation allegedly uncovered images of female genitalia on his phone, as well as evidence he used and distributed illicit drugs and had an affair with a patient. The Maryland Board of Physicians suspended Dr. John Yacoub's medical license, saying in an Oct. 8 order that emergency action was needed to address risks to public health and safety. Yacoub has worked as an OB/GYN and directed minimally invasive surgery centers at both Greater Baltimore Medical Center and Saint Agnes Hospital, and most recently worked in a private practice at GBMC.
NEWS
By ANNIE LINSKEY AND DENNIS O'BRIEN and ANNIE LINSKEY AND DENNIS O'BRIEN,SUN REPORTERS | January 27, 2006
A prescription pain medication that Baltimore sportscaster Keith Mills has been accused of stealing from a neighbor is one that experts say is among the most commonly abused, and is the subject of more than a thousand lawsuits claiming its manufacturer failed to adequately warn patients and doctors of its addictive properties. Mills, 48, was arrested Wednesday and charged with stealing OxyContin and Hydrocodone from a next-door neighbor who was undergoing cancer treatment. It was the third time he has been charged with drug-related offenses in the past two years, and came a week before completion of his probation stemming from an earlier Baltimore County drug arrest.
NEWS
April 7, 2001
FOR ALL THE right reasons, state lawmakers may take some unwise steps. They want to help seniors who are too poor to buy prescription drugs. But in doing so, they may be hurting Maryland druggists and committing the state to a program of immense proportions. Senators and delegates are trying to cobble together a bill that would help Medicare recipients, and those not quite poor enough to qualify for Medicare, obtain prescription drugs. A reluctant Gov. Parris N. Glendening put $6.5 million in his budget for this purpose.
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