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Prescription Drugs

HEALTH
Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2014
A database in Kentucky that has tracked potentially dangerous and addictive prescriptions dispensed in the state for the past 15 years has become a national model by helping significantly reduce so-called doctor-shopping for pain drugs. Federal data show the state has dropped from the second-highest abuser of prescription drugs such as OxyContin and Percocet to 31st. But what it and other states cannot show is that such programs cut down on overdose deaths from all legal and illegal drugs, a lesson not lost on Maryland as its joins every other state in launching its own prescription drug monitoring system.
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NEWS
By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,SUN STAFF | March 21, 2001
Responding to a "crisis" created by the rising cost of prescription drugs, the state Senate unanimously approved a bill yesterday that would earmark $20 million to expand programs offering free or discounted medications to senior citizens and the poor. Supporters said the legislation would allow the subsidy programs, which benefit fewer than 50,000 Marylanders now, to reach an additional 72,000 who lack prescription drug coverage. "We have a crisis in dealing with prescription drugs in this country," said Sen. Thomas L. Bromwell, a Baltimore County Democrat and a sponsor of the bill.
NEWS
December 7, 2012
Health officials still aren't certain what is causing the alarming uptick in heroin overdoses that has occurred across Maryland recently. But it would be especially disturbing if the trend turns out to be an unintended consequence of state efforts to crack down on prescription drug abuse and fraud. The concern is that people addicted to prescription drugs are now finding them harder to get, and as a result may be turning to illegal narcotics like heroin, which are cheap and relatively easy to obtain on the street but which pose even greater public health and safety risks.
NEWS
July 29, 1993
Man charged in sale of prescription drugsA Brooklyn Park man was charged with illegally selling prescription drugs after police searched his home late Wednesday.According to the police report, officers searched the home of James Franklin Crites, 51, in the 600 block of Biscay Ave. at 10:40 p.m. and seized illegal prescription pain killers and other drugs.Investigators said Mr. Crites sold the drugs to undercover officers shortly before the raid. He was also charged with possession of a controlled dangerous substance.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | January 8, 2013
A Bel Air man was sentenced to more than 10 years in prison Tuesday after he pleaded guilty to selling prescription drugs on dozens of occasions, the U.S. Department of Justice announced. Ronnie Stocks, 34, pleaded guilty to conspiracy to distribute and possession with intent to distribute the drug Oxycodone. He was sentenced by a U.S. District court judge to 101/2 years in prison with three years of probation. Harford County detectives said Stocks had about three dozen customers and typically sold them drugs in amounts less than $100.
NEWS
By Boston Globe | September 11, 1992
Prices of the 20 most popular prescription drugs jumped 80 percent on average from 1984 to 1991, four times the general inflation rate for the period, according to a report that accuses drug companies of profiteering."
NEWS
April 7, 2001
FOR ALL THE right reasons, state lawmakers may take some unwise steps. They want to help seniors who are too poor to buy prescription drugs. But in doing so, they may be hurting Maryland druggists and committing the state to a program of immense proportions. Senators and delegates are trying to cobble together a bill that would help Medicare recipients, and those not quite poor enough to qualify for Medicare, obtain prescription drugs. A reluctant Gov. Parris N. Glendening put $6.5 million in his budget for this purpose.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, Jessica Anderson and Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2013
A longtime Towson-based defense attorney who represents accused drug dealers is being investigated for allegedly smuggling prescription pills to her clients inside the Baltimore County jail, police said. Elise Armacost, a county police spokeswoman, said attorney Jill Swerdlin had been on the "radar screen" of police since early 2012 as someone who may have been involved in the distribution of prescription drugs. Then, earlier this year, police got another tip that a defense attorney was smuggling drugs into the jail, Armacost said, which led them to Swerdlin.
NEWS
By ANNIE LINSKEY AND DENNIS O'BRIEN and ANNIE LINSKEY AND DENNIS O'BRIEN,SUN REPORTERS | January 27, 2006
A prescription pain medication that Baltimore sportscaster Keith Mills has been accused of stealing from a neighbor is one that experts say is among the most commonly abused, and is the subject of more than a thousand lawsuits claiming its manufacturer failed to adequately warn patients and doctors of its addictive properties. Mills, 48, was arrested Wednesday and charged with stealing OxyContin and Hydrocodone from a next-door neighbor who was undergoing cancer treatment. It was the third time he has been charged with drug-related offenses in the past two years, and came a week before completion of his probation stemming from an earlier Baltimore County drug arrest.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 27, 2000
WASHINGTON - Riding a wave of success on his prescription-drug plan, Vice President Al Gore plans to dedicate all this next week to a cross-country discussion of health care issues and a comparison of his proposals with those of Gov. George W. Bush. Gore's advisers, who outlined the strategy in a conference call yesterday morning, said that prescription drugs had emerged as the "top issue," and that Gore had surged in the polls in part because he had dedicated so much time to the issue.
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