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Prescription Drugs

NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | January 15, 2013
Federal authorities announced Tuesday that they had cracked a large suburban Maryland drug organization, arresting 18 people and charging 15 of them with conspiracy to distribute more than a ton of marijuana. According to a federal grand jury indictment, the drug trafficking organization, primarily based in Anne Arundel County, also dealt in cocaine, prescription drugs, steroids and other drugs. Law enforcement officials said they seized at least 30 cars, 60 pounds of marijuana, $300,000 in cash and 35 guns in the investigation.
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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | December 8, 2011
State health officials took the unusual step Thursday of suspending the authority of a Salisbury pain doctor to write prescriptions for opiates, narcotics and all other controlled dangerous substances commonly used to treat pain. The officials said Dr. Brent R. Fox wasn't conducting thorough exams of patients and was prescribing drugs in amounts outside of the standards. They will consider a permanent revocation next week and have referred the case to the state Board of Physicians for investigation of his right to practice medicine.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, Jessica Anderson and Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2013
A longtime Towson-based defense attorney who represents accused drug dealers is being investigated for allegedly smuggling prescription pills to her clients inside the Baltimore County jail, police said. Elise Armacost, a county police spokeswoman, said attorney Jill Swerdlin had been on the "radar screen" of police since early 2012 as someone who may have been involved in the distribution of prescription drugs. Then, earlier this year, police got another tip that a defense attorney was smuggling drugs into the jail, Armacost said, which led them to Swerdlin.
NEWS
July 29, 1993
Man charged in sale of prescription drugsA Brooklyn Park man was charged with illegally selling prescription drugs after police searched his home late Wednesday.According to the police report, officers searched the home of James Franklin Crites, 51, in the 600 block of Biscay Ave. at 10:40 p.m. and seized illegal prescription pain killers and other drugs.Investigators said Mr. Crites sold the drugs to undercover officers shortly before the raid. He was also charged with possession of a controlled dangerous substance.
NEWS
By Ellen Weber, Andrea Gielen and G. Caleb Alexander | February 25, 2013
With epidemic rates of prescription opioid and heroin deaths in Maryland, families are demanding easier access to the antidote that could save the lives of their loved ones. Naloxone is used safely to reverse the effects of heroin and prescription opioid medications. Emergency medical technicians administer naloxone when they respond to an overdose emergency. All too often, however, these emergency responders do not arrive in time. State law bars family members and friends who may be in the best position to save the life of a person experiencing an overdose from obtaining a prescription for naloxone in their own name and administering this medication in an emergency.
BUSINESS
By KATHLEEN KERR and KATHLEEN KERR,NEWSDAY | May 6, 2006
They look like ATMs but when the right password is punched in, prescription drugs - all generics - pop out instead of greenbacks. And soon these machines, which encourage doctors to prescribe generics instead of more expensive brand-name drugs, could be coming to a physician's office near you. The machines allow doctors to give patients their first prescription of a generic drug free, straight from the machines. Patients cannot access the machines without authorization. If the patient requires a refill, the doctor writes a regular prescription for the generic drug to be filled at the normal price at a drugstore.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen, The Baltimore Sun | October 20, 2010
Underneath the mattress isn't going to cut it. Neither will tucking it behind the stack of "Twilight" books. Not even pushing it deep into the toe of a smelly gym shoe. The dog will find it. And he'll know it's not oregano. A new service in Maryland is promising parents peace of mind by allowing them to essentially rent a drug-sniffing dog, a highly trained canine that will come to their house and within seconds, detect even the tiniest whiff of narcotics. The program allows ordinary moms and dads access to a search tool typically reserved for law enforcement — and typically aimed at suspected criminals.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | January 8, 2013
A Bel Air man was sentenced to more than 10 years in prison Tuesday after he pleaded guilty to selling prescription drugs on dozens of occasions, the U.S. Department of Justice announced. Ronnie Stocks, 34, pleaded guilty to conspiracy to distribute and possession with intent to distribute the drug Oxycodone. He was sentenced by a U.S. District court judge to 101/2 years in prison with three years of probation. Harford County detectives said Stocks had about three dozen customers and typically sold them drugs in amounts less than $100.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 28, 2004
PHILADELPHIA - Federal officials in Philadelphia charged three pharmacists and two doctors yesterday with illegally selling hundreds of thousands of pills, including popular medications Prilosec, Celebrex and Prozac, that had been handed out as promotional free samples by drug companies. The samples were sold in retail pharmacies in Philadelphia and Montgomery County, Pa., federal prosecutors say. Four other individuals - two of them drug company representatives - were charged this year in federal court in Philadelphia with selling drug samples for cash.
NEWS
April 7, 2001
FOR ALL THE right reasons, state lawmakers may take some unwise steps. They want to help seniors who are too poor to buy prescription drugs. But in doing so, they may be hurting Maryland druggists and committing the state to a program of immense proportions. Senators and delegates are trying to cobble together a bill that would help Medicare recipients, and those not quite poor enough to qualify for Medicare, obtain prescription drugs. A reluctant Gov. Parris N. Glendening put $6.5 million in his budget for this purpose.
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