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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | April 27, 2012
Have unwanted prescription drugs in your medicine cabinet? Don't toss them in the trash or leave them to experimenting hands. Drop them off at a designated site on National Drug Take-Back Day this Saturday. State health officials say abuse of prescription drugs is on the rise -- between 2007 and 2010, the percentage of prescription drug-related admissions to Maryland Alcohol and Drug Abuse Administration -funded treatment programs nearly doubled, resulting in one in five admissions.
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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn and The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2014
Continuing Maryland's push to stem drug abuse, officials sought Wednesday to refocus the annual prescription "take-back" day on treatment and prevention and away from law enforcement. The nationwide take-back day — which is Saturday — has traditionally been used by its sponsors at the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration to collect expired or unneeded prescription drugs that could be abused if left in family medicine cabinets, or could poison children or pollute the environment.
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EXPLORE
October 28, 2011
Local police departments are participating in the National Take Back Initiative this weekend by providing an opportunity for residents to turn in expired or unwanted prescriptive substances and other medications. At the take-back day, controlled, non-controlled and over-the-counter substances will all be collected, and donors will remain anonymous; no requests for identification will be made. Participants should remove any identifying information that might be found on a prescription label on a container.
NEWS
September 14, 2014
State officials are hoping a new public health initiative to track the distribution and sale of highly addictive prescription drugs in Maryland can help reduce the number of people who abuse such medications. The initiative, inspired by a program originally developed in Kentucky 15 years ago, has led to a drastic drop in prescription drug abuse there, and it has the potential to become an important element in Maryland's overall effort to reduce overdose deaths from both legal and illegal drugs.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | August 20, 2014
A city councilman is questioning a $1.6 million deal for a St. Louis company to provide prescription drugs to city workers, arguing that the work should go to local pharmacies. City Councilman Robert W. Curran said St. Louis-based Express Scripts, which holds a multimillion-dollar contract to provide prescription drug benefits to Baltimore City employees, has engaged in "deceptive practices," including overbilling the city for prescription drugs a decade ago. "Express Scripts did shortchange us," Curran told the city's spending panel Wednesday morning during a pre-meeting in a City Hall conference room.
NEWS
By Jamie Manfuso and Jamie Manfuso,SUN STAFF | January 23, 2001
A Frederick County woman accused of trying to buy prescription drugs by using a false name was arrested at a Woodbine pharmacy and charged with several counts, the Carroll County Sheriff's Department said. Deputies arrested Sue Ellen Luckenbaugh, 38, of New Market after a woman tried to purchase the anti-anxiety prescription drug Xanax at King's Pharmacy under an assumed name, they said. Workers at the pharmacy had complained to authorities last week after receiving phone calls requesting Xanax from a woman who said she worked for a local physician.
NEWS
By Doug Donovan | September 24, 2007
Two Maryland men have been indicted in federal court for illegally selling prescription drugs over the Internet and several other charges related to dispensing 10 million painkillers from their Baltimore pharmacy over two years - leading to overdose deaths of two customers, according to federal prosecutors. Pharmacists Steven Abiodun Sodipo, 51, of Forest Hill and Callixtus Onigbo Nwaehiri, 48, of Jarrettsville were indicted Friday on charges of illegally selling 9,936,075 pills of hydrocodone over the Internet, engaging in a continuing criminal enterprise and in monetary transactions using illegal proceeds, and tax charges, according to Maryland U.S. Attorney Rod J. Rosenstein's office.
NEWS
October 25, 1995
Someone broke into a house in the first block of Gambrills Road in Severn and stole nearly $300 in prescription drugs, county police said.A resident of the house told police the intruder used a broom handle to break the glass in a rear door about 2:30 p.m. Friday to get inside and take the drugs.He said he recognized the man running from his home, police said.
NEWS
By Tanya Jones and Tanya Jones,Sun Staff Writer | November 26, 1994
Robert J. Penland was working undercover, negotiating to buy a ton of raw opium in a remote Pakistani farming village, when he got a sinking feeling.He was on his own.Armed guards were posted on rooftops of the village huts, and Mr. Penland, a Drug Enforcement Administration agent, could quickly become their target. His backup protection was 10 miles away."I was all by myself, on my own wits," he said recently, recalling a sting operation that eventually netted a large cache of opium, the basic ingredient for heroin.
NEWS
By Froma Harrop | April 13, 2000
DRUG COMPANY officials can hardly believe their ears. Sen. Slade Gorton of Washington, a Republican, wants government to force down the prices they charge Americans for prescription drugs. He calls them "the new health-care villains." Folks in the pharmaceutical industry should know that there is nothing wrong with their hearing. It was only last October that the Pharmaceutical Researchers and Manufacturers of America unleashed a spry old lady named Flo on the American public. In numerous ads, Flo envisioned that government bureaucrats would rifle through her medicine chest if President Clinton's proposal for Medicare drug coverage became reality.
HEALTH
Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2014
A database in Kentucky that has tracked potentially dangerous and addictive prescriptions dispensed in the state for the past 15 years has become a national model by helping significantly reduce so-called doctor-shopping for pain drugs. Federal data show the state has dropped from the second-highest abuser of prescription drugs such as OxyContin and Percocet to 31st. But what it and other states cannot show is that such programs cut down on overdose deaths from all legal and illegal drugs, a lesson not lost on Maryland as its joins every other state in launching its own prescription drug monitoring system.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | August 20, 2014
A city councilman is questioning a $1.6 million deal for a St. Louis company to provide prescription drugs to city workers, arguing that the work should go to local pharmacies. City Councilman Robert W. Curran said St. Louis-based Express Scripts, which holds a multimillion-dollar contract to provide prescription drug benefits to Baltimore City employees, has engaged in "deceptive practices," including overbilling the city for prescription drugs a decade ago. "Express Scripts did shortchange us," Curran told the city's spending panel Wednesday morning during a pre-meeting in a City Hall conference room.
NEWS
August 13, 2014
We were saddened to read about Baltimore County Police Officer Joseph Stanley Harden's arrest on robbery and drug possession charges ( "Off-duty officer tries to break into home in search of drugs, police say," Aug. 1). The veteran officer reportedly told investigators he became addicted to Oxycodone after a work-related injury. While there is a general awareness of prescription drug abuse in our society, most people do not understand the complicated problem of chronic pain syndrome that can lead to prescription drug dependence or addiction.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | May 20, 2014
A lawsuit filed in federal court Tuesday alleging that the NFL loaded up players with medications came after a major Baltimore law firm spent more than a year investigating the claims. The suit, filed in California on behalf of eight retired players, alleges that the football league put its profits ahead of their well-being when they illegally gave players drugs without filling out prescriptions or warning them of side effects. "The NFL has supported a drug culture that has provided dangerous pain killers and anti-inflammatories for free to players for years with no warnings as to their side effects or the dangers of mixing them together and with alcohol,” said Steve Silverman, a partner at the firm of Silverman Thompson Slutkin and White.
NEWS
By Sharon Sloane | March 31, 2014
America has crossed a few ominous thresholds that should give us pause. For one, poisonings are killing more people than car crashes in the United States, making them the leading cause of accidental death in the country for the first time. The vast majority of those deaths are from legal, prescription drugs. Second, more children report having been tormented and harassed online than in "real-life"; 43 percent of kids claim to be victims of such cyber-bullying. According to Yale University, victims of bullying are nearly 10 times more likely to consider suicide than non-victims.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker and By Andrea K. Walker | January 6, 2014
National health care spending increased 3.7 percent to $2.8 trillion in 2012, continuing a four-year trend of slow growth, according to new federal data. Spending on health grew more slowly than gross domestic product, pushing the share of the economy devoted to health care down from 17.3 percent in 2011 to 17.2 percent last year, according to analysis by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services released in the January issue of Health Affairs. The declines reflect the continued impact of the past recession and reduction in Medicare payments to skilled nuring facilities.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | September 8, 2005
Saying abuse of such painkillers as OxyContin and Vicodin has become a problem as big as heroin and cocaine, Attorney General J. Joseph Curran Jr. unveiled a set of proposals yesterday designed to attack the illegal trade in prescription drugs. Curran said he will press the General Assembly to enact an electronic prescription drug monitoring program, strengthen laws prohibiting illegal trafficking in the medications, regulate unlicensed pharmacy technicians, create education campaigns and increase training for law enforcement in how to deal with the problem.
NEWS
By Nancy Rosen-Cohen | April 21, 2010
There isn't much attention paid to prescription drug abuse, except perhaps when a Hollywood star dies from an overdose. However, it is estimated that nearly one in five Americans has used prescription drugs for nonmedicinal reasons, and 15 percent may be abusing prescription drugs. This silent epidemic has become the leading cause of addiction. This week, the Maryland Chapter of the National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence and the University of Maryland Medical Center sponsored the annual Tuerk Conference, a gathering of 1,200 health professionals working in the field of addictions to focus on treatment and prevention of prescription drug abuse.
NEWS
December 21, 2013
Commentator Vincent DeMarco clearly knows what the true purpose of the Affordable Care Act is - getting free health care for 100,000 Marylanders at other people's expense ( "Don't forget the ACA's true purpose," Dec. 16). I do not know how you define "working families," but I do know what the ACA's cost would be to me and my "working" husband. Last year, my husband started thinking about slowing down at work and going part-time. When I checked in September of 2013, we could have gotten a family plan for ourselves and our two children for about $600 a month.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | November 24, 2013
Two men robbed a Glen Burnie pharmacy at gunpoint Saturday, Anne Arundel County police said. Shortly after 9 a.m., two men wearing black clothing, masks, sunglasses and gloves entered Arundel Pharmacy in the 7500 block Ritchie Highway, police said. One suspect displayed a handgun, and both jumped over a store counter, where they took an undisclosed quantity of prescription medications, according to police. They fled the premises in a small, silver car, possibly a Hyundai. Anyone with information is asked to call police at 410-222-3566.
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