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Prescription Costs

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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 18, 2003
INDIANAPOLIS - Nothing concerns state governors more these days than their state budgets, and nothing is driving their deficits deeper, they say, than rising Medicaid costs. With only three states showing a budget surplus, all 50 governors have lined up in a rare show of unity to support a provision of the House prescription drug bill that would shift as much as $7 billion in costs to the federal government to cover more than 6 million people known as "dual eligibles." The title refers to people who qualify for prescription coverage under both Medicare, the federal program for the elderly, and Medicaid, the federal-state partnership for the poor.
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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | July 25, 2012
Seniors in Maryland have saved $56.5 million on prescription drug costs because of a provision under health care reform that has eased the Medicare donut hole, new government data has found. The savings were achieved with rebates and discounts to ease the burden of the donut hole, when patients reach certain limits that require them to pay 100 percent of their prescription drug costs. The $56.5 million in savings has occurred since health reform was adopted, according to The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services.
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NEWS
March 20, 2011
Earlier this year in Annapolis I saw a very troubling glimpse of things to come when the budget cutting ax falls. Staff reported to the members of the legislature that while the state of Maryland was contractually required to provide medical benefits, including prescription drug assistance, to active employees this was not the case with retirees. They, desperately looking for places to cut put a bull's eye on us, their former employees. Morality and decency be damned, it was legal after all, to carve up the benefits retirees rely on. Maryland has long provided it's former workers in retirement the same prescription plan it provided its current employees.
NEWS
April 3, 2012
Letter writer Bob Bruninga is right ("Smart meters are safe," April 2), smart meters are safe and can save us money, if we choose to save money - which most Americans don't chose to do. Finally, the U.S. is getting smart about saving energy. I lived in the United Kingdom more than 40 years ago, and they had smart meters way back then. They charged you a different rate for different times of the day. There were three different rates. Obviously, the middle of the night was the cheapest time, so we set our dishwashers and clothes washers to come on and run in the middle of the night.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 24, 2003
WASHINGTON - A congressional team was negotiating late yesterday over Medicare legislation that would cover prescription drugs, but Senate Democrats warned that they would reject the package if it forced the government health insurance program to compete with private plans. Setting up such a competition for beneficiaries' premium dollars would mean "the demise of Medicare as we've known it," said Senate Minority Leader Tom Daschle. The South Dakota Democrat called it "virtually a show-stopper."
NEWS
August 23, 2006
Date of birth: Jan. 22, 1964 Party affiliation: Democrat Professional experience: Attorney; public-sector lobbyist for Baltimore City and Anne Arundel County Education: Loyola High School; Georgetown University; Georgetown University Law Center Personal: Native Baltimorean; author of Baltimore Politics 1971-1986: The Schaefer Years and the Struggle for Succession 1. Why are you running for Congress? I have spent most of my life in the 3rd Congressional District.
NEWS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,Sun reporter | October 27, 2006
Wal-Mart's $4 generic-prescription program - launched yesterday in Maryland and 11 other states as part of an accelerated rollout - will likely provide price relief for the uninsured, a quick surge in sales and matching deals from other large retailers. Target quickly said yesterday that it will match the price of $4 for a month's supply of pills in all states where Wal-Mart offers it. Kmart has a program - started months before Wal-Mart's - providing some generics at $15 for a three-month supply.
NEWS
By Orlando Sentinel | November 17, 1993
LAKE BUENA VISTA, Fla. -- If you want to know the cost of that much-needed prescription drug you're about to buy -- don't look to your doctors for guidance.Chances are they have only a vague idea or don't know at all. And don't be surprised if your pharmacist steps into the process, recommending cheaper generics or alternative medications.A pair of surveys released this week in Orlando show that not only are doctors generally unaware of how much the medications they prescribe cost their patients, but pharmacists are intervening aggressively in the doctor-patient relationship to lower costs.
NEWS
April 3, 2012
Letter writer Bob Bruninga is right ("Smart meters are safe," April 2), smart meters are safe and can save us money, if we choose to save money - which most Americans don't chose to do. Finally, the U.S. is getting smart about saving energy. I lived in the United Kingdom more than 40 years ago, and they had smart meters way back then. They charged you a different rate for different times of the day. There were three different rates. Obviously, the middle of the night was the cheapest time, so we set our dishwashers and clothes washers to come on and run in the middle of the night.
BUSINESS
By Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar and Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 8, 2008
WASHINGTON -- The nation's health care bill climbed above $2 trillion in 2006, averaging a record $7,026 per person, according to a government report released today. The report is likely to intensify the presidential campaign debate over curbing costs and covering the nation's 47 million uninsured people. Costs increased 6.7 percent over 2005, according to the report by Medicare's actuaries - only slightly higher than the 6.5 percent rate in 2005. But it was still well above the overall rate of inflation.
HEALTH
Andrea K. Walker | March 19, 2012
Medicare recipients in Maryland saved $46.2 million in prescription drug costs because of health care reform, the Obama Administration said today. The savings were achieved with rebates and discounts to ease the burden of the donut hole, when patients reach certain limits that require them to pay 100 percent of their prescription drug costs. The announcement was made as health care reform celebrates its second anniversary this week. In Maryland, 73,269 Medicare beneficiaries have saved an average of $630.19 onprescription drugs costs.  The savings came from a one-time $250 rebate check to seniors who hit the “donut hole” coverage gap in 2010 and a 50 percent discount on covered brand-name drugs in the donut hole in 2011.
BUSINESS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2011
Teresa Frost had not one but two cats with chronic illnesses, and the prescription costs were adding up. Hopey needed kidney medicine that cost $30 at the veterinarian's office every 10 days, but Frost found a seller online who only wanted $7.25, including shipping. When she asked for copies of the prescription, though, she got a reluctant response. "It was a little bit sticky with the vet," the Arbutus resident said. "They acted like it was something they wouldn't normally do. " It might not be common practice, but it's required.
NEWS
March 20, 2011
Earlier this year in Annapolis I saw a very troubling glimpse of things to come when the budget cutting ax falls. Staff reported to the members of the legislature that while the state of Maryland was contractually required to provide medical benefits, including prescription drug assistance, to active employees this was not the case with retirees. They, desperately looking for places to cut put a bull's eye on us, their former employees. Morality and decency be damned, it was legal after all, to carve up the benefits retirees rely on. Maryland has long provided it's former workers in retirement the same prescription plan it provided its current employees.
BUSINESS
By Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar and Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 8, 2008
WASHINGTON -- The nation's health care bill climbed above $2 trillion in 2006, averaging a record $7,026 per person, according to a government report released today. The report is likely to intensify the presidential campaign debate over curbing costs and covering the nation's 47 million uninsured people. Costs increased 6.7 percent over 2005, according to the report by Medicare's actuaries - only slightly higher than the 6.5 percent rate in 2005. But it was still well above the overall rate of inflation.
NEWS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,Sun reporter | October 27, 2006
Wal-Mart's $4 generic-prescription program - launched yesterday in Maryland and 11 other states as part of an accelerated rollout - will likely provide price relief for the uninsured, a quick surge in sales and matching deals from other large retailers. Target quickly said yesterday that it will match the price of $4 for a month's supply of pills in all states where Wal-Mart offers it. Kmart has a program - started months before Wal-Mart's - providing some generics at $15 for a three-month supply.
NEWS
August 23, 2006
Date of birth: Jan. 22, 1964 Party affiliation: Democrat Professional experience: Attorney; public-sector lobbyist for Baltimore City and Anne Arundel County Education: Loyola High School; Georgetown University; Georgetown University Law Center Personal: Native Baltimorean; author of Baltimore Politics 1971-1986: The Schaefer Years and the Struggle for Succession 1. Why are you running for Congress? I have spent most of my life in the 3rd Congressional District.
BUSINESS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2011
Teresa Frost had not one but two cats with chronic illnesses, and the prescription costs were adding up. Hopey needed kidney medicine that cost $30 at the veterinarian's office every 10 days, but Frost found a seller online who only wanted $7.25, including shipping. When she asked for copies of the prescription, though, she got a reluctant response. "It was a little bit sticky with the vet," the Arbutus resident said. "They acted like it was something they wouldn't normally do. " It might not be common practice, but it's required.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | May 7, 1991
WASHINGTON -- An ambitious attempt by the federal government to trim its prescription drug costs appears to have backfired and left the average taxpayer stuck with the bill.Health-care experts say privately that insured patients will face higher hospital bills because of a new law requiring drug companies to pay the government rebates on Medicaid prescriptions.The reason: The companies have raised their prices to hospitals by up to 20 percent in response to the law."Free enterprise is not going to take a hit," said Jim LaFlamme, pharmacy director at Elkhart General Hospital in Elkhart, Ind. "Basically, you pass the cost on to the consumer sooner or later."
NEWS
By KELLY BREWINGTON and KELLY BREWINGTON,SUN REPORTER | January 25, 2006
With wrenching tales of low-income seniors being overcharged or unable to afford medication, advocates for enrollees in the new Medicare prescription drug program asked state legislators yesterday to cover some of the costs and improve the convoluted system. Advocates encouraged lawmakers to follow the lead of 25 other states and the District of Columbia, who have pledged to temporarily cover drug costs for some recipients. While the program, known as Medicare Part D, has puzzled many seniors, advocates argued that enrollees with mental illnesses and low-income beneficiaries - those covered by both Medicaid and Medicare - are the most vulnerable under the new system.
NEWS
By Doug Donovan and Doug Donovan,SUN STAFF | April 21, 2005
Baltimore Mayor Martin O'Malley unveiled a program yesterday that offers all city residents the chance to spend less on prescription drugs, an initiative being tried by other local governments across the nation to ease the escalating cost of medications. O'Malley announced that the city has contracted with Tucson, Ariz.-based ScriptSave for a discount card that can provide savings of 20 percent to 50 percent on nearly every prescription drug approved by the federal government. Montgomery County and 20 other counties nationwide began offering a similar program in December through their national association.
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