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By Los Angeles Times | June 11, 1991
TOKYO -- Police investigators following the serpentine money trails of a company strongly suspected of being tied to a major Japanese "yakuza," or gangster, group have stumbled across a surprising American connection.The police discovered that Prescott Bush, the older brother of President Bush, was working as a consultant to West Tsusho, a Tokyo-based investment company which police believe is backed by one of Japan's most powerful underworld figures and which they are investigating for possible violation of foreign exchange laws.
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NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Washington Bureau | January 21, 1993
WASHINGTON -- George Bush said goodbye yesterday to 30 years in public life, with a smile on his lips and little hint of the pain he must have felt at the parting.He turned over his home, his office, his country to a competitor who bested him in a bitter struggle for a job he loved. And Mr. Bush had to stand as chief witness to this transfer of his power to President Clinton, as if blessing it by his silent acquiescence.But it was an exit with grace, typical of a man who manages to combine ruthless politics with flawless manners and uncommon kindness.
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NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | May 18, 1991
DEMOCRATS' control of Congress gives them an opportunity to use hearings as a way to develop their favorite issues for the 1992 presidential campaign.Here are 15 questions Senate Democrats should ask Robert Gates at the upcoming confirmation hearings on his nomination to be director of central intelligence.1. Did George Bush, while he was vice president, take part in any of the 1985-1986 negotiations with Iran involving the United States' sale of arms to that country in exchange for the release of American hostages?
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | October 19, 1992
BILL CLINTON said to George Bush, "When Joe McCarthy went around the country attacking people's patriotism, he was wrong. He was wrong. And a senator from Connecticut stood up to him named Prescott Bush. Your father was right to stand up to Joe McCarthy. You were wrong to attack my patriotism."Prescott Bush did stand up to McCarthy. What makes that remarkable is that few Republican senators would do so in Joe's heyday. What makes it even more remarkable is that Bush was one of the few senators who actually liked old Joe.They met in 1952, when McCarthy was at the peak of his political power.
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | October 19, 1992
BILL CLINTON said to George Bush, "When Joe McCarthy went around the country attacking people's patriotism, he was wrong. He was wrong. And a senator from Connecticut stood up to him named Prescott Bush. Your father was right to stand up to Joe McCarthy. You were wrong to attack my patriotism."Prescott Bush did stand up to McCarthy. What makes that remarkable is that few Republican senators would do so in Joe's heyday. What makes it even more remarkable is that Bush was one of the few senators who actually liked old Joe.They met in 1952, when McCarthy was at the peak of his political power.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | October 12, 1992
ST. LOUIS -- If President Bush needed a superb performance by himself or a major gaffe by Gov. Bill Clinton to resurrect his flagging reelection campaign, he didn't get either in last night's first 1992 presidential debate.Over the 95-minute exchange among the two major-party nominees and independent candidate Ross Perot, nothing happened that is likely to change the outlook that existed going into the debate. As a result, the challenge for the president heading for the second three-way debate in Richmond Thursday night remains the same.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,Sun Staff Correspondent | September 23, 1990
DENVER -- What's in a name? Fate, perhaps, if the name is Neil Mallon Bush.Many of those who have followed the savings and loan scandal think Neil Bush's last name opened doors in the Denver business community, eventually landing him a seat on the board of directors of the doomed Silverado Banking, Savings and LoanAssociation.His family thinks his name drew the attention, unfairly, of federal regulators, who accused him of conflicts of interest after Silverado collapsed."It's darn unfair that they're only doing it to hurt George Bush . . . and they have succeeded," first lady Barbara Bush told wire service reporters recently.
NEWS
By GEORGE F. WILL | October 13, 1992
Washington.--In St. Louis, whither he went in search of restored pre-eminence, the incumbent president sometimes seemed, amazingly, to be the third man, even a bystander on stage.Whatever suspense surrounded the debate leaked from it early when Mr. Bush became defensive about his most recent attempt to put Governor Clinton on defensive. The president began, ''I said something the other day where I was accused of being like Joe McCarthy.'' Mr. Clinton played the Prescott Bush card (refraining from saying, ''And you're no Prescott Bush'')
NEWS
By Peter H. Kostmayer | July 26, 1991
FOUR decades ago, George Bush learned a political lesson he refuses to forget.The year was 1950, and the future president's father, Prescott Bush, was in a neck-and-neck U.S. Senate race in Connecticut. As the campaign entered its final days, disaster struck: Press reports disclosed that the senior Bush was a supporter of Planned Parenthood, causing an uproar among conservative voters. Prescott Bush lost the election by barely one-tenth of a percent of the vote. By all accounts, the birth-control issue cost him the election.
NEWS
By John E. Woodruff and John E. Woodruff,Tokyo Bureau | September 21, 1992
FUKUI, Japan -- This town of weaving mills and prefect bureaucrats has become a busy stop on an above-ground railroad that leads hoodlums up from Japan's underworld of swaggering, tattooed yakuza gangsters.The man to see is Dr. Mitsuo Yoshimura.Gangsters know him as the surgeon who cuts off toes and attaches them to the stubs of pinkie fingers lopped off years ago as atonement for offenses against their gangland bosses.Dr. Yoshimura charges $3,500 a pinkie. It's a bargain, for every Japanese knows a missing pinkie means yakuza.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,Washington Bureau Chief Sun columnist Roger Simon contributed to this article | October 16, 1992
RICHMOND, Va. -- The presidential candidates fielded questions from an audience of ordinary citizens last night in a subdued political experiment that broke little fresh ground in the 1992 race.President Bush and Gov. Bill Clinton, his Democratic challenger, were far more restrained than they were in Sunday's opening debate. For the most part, they and independent Ross Perot stuck to the issues at the insistence of the audience, while taking advantage of the generally soft questions to recite segments of their stump speeches.
NEWS
By GEORGE F. WILL | October 13, 1992
Washington.--In St. Louis, whither he went in search of restored pre-eminence, the incumbent president sometimes seemed, amazingly, to be the third man, even a bystander on stage.Whatever suspense surrounded the debate leaked from it early when Mr. Bush became defensive about his most recent attempt to put Governor Clinton on defensive. The president began, ''I said something the other day where I was accused of being like Joe McCarthy.'' Mr. Clinton played the Prescott Bush card (refraining from saying, ''And you're no Prescott Bush'')
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | October 12, 1992
ST. LOUIS -- If President Bush needed a superb performance by himself or a major gaffe by Gov. Bill Clinton to resurrect his flagging reelection campaign, he didn't get either in last night's first 1992 presidential debate.Over the 95-minute exchange among the two major-party nominees and independent candidate Ross Perot, nothing happened that is likely to change the outlook that existed going into the debate. As a result, the challenge for the president heading for the second three-way debate in Richmond Thursday night remains the same.
NEWS
By Michael Kernan | October 1, 1992
I AM amazed at all this talk about "trust" in the campaign.I have voted in the last 11 presidential elections, and I don't recall ever before being asked to "trust" any of the candidates. I thought everyone understood that politicians are to like but not to trust, that a great deal of what they say is rhetoric and not to be taken literally. They are by nature compromisers and artists of the possible.The one and only difference between liberals and conservatives is that liberals have a somewhat more ambitious notion of what is possible.
NEWS
By John E. Woodruff and John E. Woodruff,Tokyo Bureau | September 21, 1992
FUKUI, Japan -- This town of weaving mills and prefect bureaucrats has become a busy stop on an above-ground railroad that leads hoodlums up from Japan's underworld of swaggering, tattooed yakuza gangsters.The man to see is Dr. Mitsuo Yoshimura.Gangsters know him as the surgeon who cuts off toes and attaches them to the stubs of pinkie fingers lopped off years ago as atonement for offenses against their gangland bosses.Dr. Yoshimura charges $3,500 a pinkie. It's a bargain, for every Japanese knows a missing pinkie means yakuza.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Staff Writer | August 18, 1992
HOUSTON -- As a little boy, George Bush was so conscientious about offering to share whatever he had with playmates, his family called him "Have-half."The trait was the beginning of a lifelong habit of showering people with so many courtesies and attentions that Mr. Bush has built a wider and more loyal network of buddies, pals, companions, admirers and friends than most if not all of his Oval Office predecessors.But as he arrived here yesterday to formally begin his uphill battle for re-election, he was girding himself for combat with Democrat Bill Clinton by drawing on the less likable side of his personality.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Washington Bureau | January 21, 1993
WASHINGTON -- George Bush said goodbye yesterday to 30 years in public life, with a smile on his lips and little hint of the pain he must have felt at the parting.He turned over his home, his office, his country to a competitor who bested him in a bitter struggle for a job he loved. And Mr. Bush had to stand as chief witness to this transfer of his power to President Clinton, as if blessing it by his silent acquiescence.But it was an exit with grace, typical of a man who manages to combine ruthless politics with flawless manners and uncommon kindness.
NEWS
By Peter H. Kostmayer | July 26, 1991
FOUR decades ago, George Bush learned a political lesson he refuses to forget.The year was 1950, and the future president's father, Prescott Bush, was in a neck-and-neck U.S. Senate race in Connecticut. As the campaign entered its final days, disaster struck: Press reports disclosed that the senior Bush was a supporter of Planned Parenthood, causing an uproar among conservative voters. Prescott Bush lost the election by barely one-tenth of a percent of the vote. By all accounts, the birth-control issue cost him the election.
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