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By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | April 9, 2003
Cooking With Three Ingredients: Flavorful Food Easy as 1, 2, 3 by Andrew Schloss (Quill, 2003, $17.95) inspires a mix of elation, shame and validation in those of us who have a love/hate relationship with the kitchen. The title of the book, reissued in paperback, speaks to the cooking conundrum faced by so many: Why does preparing a delicious meal have to be complicated? And, just because you say you like to cook, does it mean you also like to tangle with complicated procedures for achieving perfect textures and taste fusions?
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BUSINESS
Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella | September 6, 2013
Wegmanswill open its newest Maryland store on Sept. 15 in Germantown with 600 employees. The supermarket will carry 70,000 products, including 700 produce items, prepared foods, 300 imported and domestic cheeses, sushi and whole fish delivered daily and cut to order. It will feature vegetable and fruit stations and a shellfish steaming station.  The grocery store will be the seventh in Maryland for Wegmans, an 81-store chain with stores in New York, Maryland, Virginia, Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Massachusetts.
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BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | June 17, 1998
Perdue Farms Inc., taking another step into the prepared-food business, said yesterday that it has entered into an agreement to acquire De Luca Inc., a manufacturer of Italian entrees and sauces marketed under the brand name Ed & Joan De Luca.Both companies are private, and the purchase price was not disclosed."This opens the door to our entry into Italian foods: lasagna, macaroni and cheese and meatballs," said Richard C. Auletta, a spokesman for Salisbury-based Perdue. "Maybe we can integrate chicken into some Italian dishes."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard,
For The Baltimore Sun
| April 17, 2013
Michael's Cafe is nearly 30 years old, but it's still hot. On a recent Thursday night, the Timonium restaurant was hopping. The warm, wood-filled bar was packed, and by 8 p.m., so was the dining room. Since its opening in 1984, Michael's has expanded several times; a current construction project will add an outdoor bar and more seating. Eavesdropping on tables around us, we realized most diners were repeat customers - back, no doubt, for Michael's capable takes on classic American food.
BUSINESS
By Sean Somerville and Sean Somerville,SUN STAFF | November 19, 1998
Valu Food, a Baltimore-based independent grocer struggling to find a niche in a field of ever-growing rivals, said yesterday that it has filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection.Louis Denrich, the company's president, called the move part of a restructuring intended to focus the grocer's attention on selling prepared foods."We felt this was a very good way to shore up ourselves for the future, to set up a strong financial structure going forward," he said.In documents filed in U.S. Bankruptcy Court in Baltimore, the company estimated that it owes its 20 largest unsecured creditors about $3.5 million.
FEATURES
By McClatchy News Service | October 7, 1990
A Sacramento software company has released a new program designed to help you track your nutritional intake and give reports for evaluating eating habits.ProSlim from K-Soft Ware is not a diet program. By entering in the foods you eat, the computer calculates the nutritional content of the foods and stores it for recall in the form of graphs and itemized lists. The database of food items includes raw and prepared foods, fast foods, snacks and candy.Pro-Slim currently is available for IBM-PC compatibles, but the Macintosh version is in the works.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | July 31, 2002
Cerando's Kitchen and Bistro, an Ellicott City prepared-foods and grocery store turned restaurant, has closed after struggling for a year with trying to find its place in the market. Jerry Cerand, the owner, could not be reached, but a message on the company answering machine announced that the shop closed this month and thanked "all our regular patrons who have visited us over the last year." The store opened in the Golden Triangle between U.S. 40 and U.S. 29 in June last year and specialized in prepared foods to go and gourmet items, including a section of summer vegetables direct from Howard County farmers.
BUSINESS
Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella | September 6, 2013
Wegmanswill open its newest Maryland store on Sept. 15 in Germantown with 600 employees. The supermarket will carry 70,000 products, including 700 produce items, prepared foods, 300 imported and domestic cheeses, sushi and whole fish delivered daily and cut to order. It will feature vegetable and fruit stations and a shellfish steaming station.  The grocery store will be the seventh in Maryland for Wegmans, an 81-store chain with stores in New York, Maryland, Virginia, Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Massachusetts.
NEWS
By GREG BARRETT and GREG BARRETT,SUN REPORTER | October 3, 2005
Terry Wilson of Cockeysville and her 12-year-old daughter, Lauren, were first, arriving at 11:25 p.m. Saturday and napping in their Dodge Intrepid. At 3:30 a.m., others arrived, and a line began to form. Within the hour, four Towson mothers joined in, and by 6:40 a.m., several hundred shoppers stood in yesterday's pre-dawn coolness - a peculiar grocery-cart traffic jam outside Hunt Valley Towne Centre. Apparently, there's no beating the rush of a Wegmans Food Market grand opening. When the doors to Maryland's first Wegmans opened four minutes early yesterday at 6:56 a.m., 500 employees were huddled inside shouting the company cheer - "W-E-G-M-A-N-S.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | July 2, 2000
Daryl Vincent Mosby, an air freight consultant and chef in a catering business he owned, died Monday in his sleep of a heart attack. He was 48 and lived in Randallstown. A sales and marketing executive for air carriers, he had recently become a consultant in that field. He also prepared foods in a family catering business that served arts and ethnic festivals. For the past 15 years he had been an air freight specialist. He began his career as a salesman for Federal Express and Air Bourne and became a vice president of government and postal sales at Emery Worldwide.
NEWS
By Arin Gencer and Arin Gencer,arin.gencer@baltsun.com | August 16, 2009
A distinct bustle filled the kitchen of the Falcon's Nest cafe as 11 a.m. approached. "Excuse me - hot," said Katina Guyton, pulling a tray of ciabatta rolls from the oven and walking to the counter out front. There, with gloves and black hairnets snapped on, her colleagues - also her classmates - were lining up behind a display of deli meats, cheeses, soups and other food. It was almost time for the lunch-hour rush of students and staff at the Forbush School at Glyndon. At the Falcon's Nest, students run the show - from food preparation to the cleanup.
NEWS
By Robin Mather Jenkins and Robin Mather Jenkins,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | November 29, 2006
Andy Williams was just plain wrong. For the party-panicky, the holidays are definitely not "the most wonderful time of the year." It may not be the going-out part that bothers the festivity-phobic. It's the terrifying idea that people might just stop by. And they're going to expect you to feed them. Sometimes your own family does it to you. "I had a lady call me to say that her husband was bringing home 10 people that night," said Heather Joye Bender of LifesCelebrations Inc. in Skokie, Ill. Bender has been a party planner for about six years.
NEWS
By GREG BARRETT and GREG BARRETT,SUN REPORTER | October 3, 2005
Terry Wilson of Cockeysville and her 12-year-old daughter, Lauren, were first, arriving at 11:25 p.m. Saturday and napping in their Dodge Intrepid. At 3:30 a.m., others arrived, and a line began to form. Within the hour, four Towson mothers joined in, and by 6:40 a.m., several hundred shoppers stood in yesterday's pre-dawn coolness - a peculiar grocery-cart traffic jam outside Hunt Valley Towne Centre. Apparently, there's no beating the rush of a Wegmans Food Market grand opening. When the doors to Maryland's first Wegmans opened four minutes early yesterday at 6:56 a.m., 500 employees were huddled inside shouting the company cheer - "W-E-G-M-A-N-S.
NEWS
By John Woestendiek and John Woestendiek,SUN STAFF | August 24, 2005
Every country has its comfort food, whether it's Jamaican Hangover Chowder or Japanese Sticky Rice Balls, Pakistani Rice Pudding or Hungarian Chicken Paprika. Pick any country, and it's a safe bet there's a recipe or two that, much like our own macaroni and cheese, is not too complex, not too costly and often turned to in times of trouble or just when the tummy yearns for something warm and hearty. More than 200 such recipes - from American Sloppy Joes to Vietnamese Happy Pancakes - are compiled in Constance Snow's new book, The Rustic Table: Simple Fare From the World's Kitchens (Morrow Cookbooks, a division of HarperCollins, $24.95)
NEWS
By Maria Blackburn and Maria Blackburn,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 25, 2004
Pfffffft. Splorp. Freed from the confines of its tin can, the gelatinous tube of cream of chicken soup plopped into the bowl of shredded chicken and canned artichoke hearts. The mayonnaise, canned mushrooms and sour cream went in next. Splorp. Splorp. Splorp. This was the sound of a midweek evening meal, the sound of a cook with too many jobs, too little time and too few ideas. This was the sound of assembling some ingredients, tossing them into a 13-inch-by-9-inch-by-2-inch Pyrex casserole and pronouncing it dinner.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 24, 2003
Roots, the popular health-food market off Route 108 in Clarksville, has branched out. On Oct. 14, Roots owners Jeff Kaufman and Jody Cutler opened Nest Natural Home Store a few doors down. Like Roots, Nest is selling items that are organic, healthful and informed by cultures around the world. But while Roots is retaining its focus on food, Nest is selling items for the home and body. On a recent visit, items at Nest included baby clothes made from organic cotton; colorful pottery designed by artists from around the world; yoga clothing and instructional videos; and artwork, greeting cards, compact discs, jewelry and cookbooks.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | December 7, 2000
Giant Food Inc. is launching a pioneering new chain aimed at time-starved consumers seeking quick and healthy meals, with the opening today of its first Freshgo by Giant in Potomac. Each of the smaller-format Freshgo supermarkets will be about one-third the size of a regular Giant, with half the space devoted to prepared meals and a floor plan designed to make shopping more efficient. Landover-based Giant plans additional Freshgos throughout the Baltimore-Washington region and is looking at sites in the Baltimore and Annapolis areas.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | November 12, 1998
In its first major attempt to reposition itself in the rapidly changing grocery industry, independent chain Valu Food is shifting its focus from its core grocery business to emphasize fresh produce and prepared meals, President Louis Denrich said yesterday.The Baltimore region's sixth-largest grocery chain will revamp its layout, merchandise mix and marketing at all 14 stores by next year, in a strategic plan to boost sales and grow in the face of intense competition, Denrich said.The Baltimore-based chain, founded in 1978, had built its name as a low-price retailer with an emphasis on nonperishable groceries.
NEWS
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | May 14, 2003
It's opening day at the Baltimore Farmers' Market under the Jones Falls Expressway, and the line grows long at the Curry Shack. Three years ago, Didi and Brian Johnson opened their stall at both the Baltimore and Waverly markets and quickly attracted a ravenous following. The Johnsons' jerk chicken, plantain chips, creole red beans and rice, samosas, soups and curries often sell out well before the market closes. This year, they will expand to the weekly market at the Village of Cross Keys.
NEWS
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | April 9, 2003
Cooking With Three Ingredients: Flavorful Food Easy as 1, 2, 3 by Andrew Schloss (Quill, 2003, $17.95) inspires a mix of elation, shame and validation in those of us who have a love/hate relationship with the kitchen. The title of the book, reissued in paperback, speaks to the cooking conundrum faced by so many: Why does preparing a delicious meal have to be complicated? And, just because you say you like to cook, does it mean you also like to tangle with complicated procedures for achieving perfect textures and taste fusions?
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