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NEWS
By Carl J. Sardegna | December 9, 1991
WE WOULD like to believe that all babies are born in the full bloom of health.In fact, far too many of them die at birth or suffer illnesses that lead to death because of low birth weight.We would also like to believe that a country as advanced as ours provides its babies with the very best of chances for survival and good health.In fact, our country is ranked 22nd in the world in infant mortality and 28th in babies born with low birth weight. Nationally, more than 25 percent of pregnant women do not receive care during the first three months.
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NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | April 12, 2014
When Trena Williams was charged last fall with first-degree murder and held without bail, she was four months pregnant. Behind bars, inmates get prenatal care. So when the charges were later reduced to accessory after the fact and she was released on home detention, Circuit Judge Stephen J. Sfekas ordered Williams, 29, to receive prenatal care as one of the conditions of her release. But even after she'd given birth to a healthy baby girl, prosecutors wanted proof that Williams had received care during her pregnancy, threatening her with jail time if she didn't comply.
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NEWS
By Robert Hilson Jr. and Robert Hilson Jr.,Staff Writer | April 21, 1992
Posie Spratley, a 26-year-old inmate at the Baltimore City Detention Center, is anxiously awaiting two important dates. On Monday, she stands trial on a charge of violating probation for a theft count, and the following week, she is due to give birth to her fourth child.If Ms. Spratley is convicted, her baby will be delivered at the University of Maryland Medical Center and she will lose custody of the child. Either Ms. Spratley's relatives or the state Social Services Department will be responsible for the child while she serves time in prison.
EXPLORE
March 8, 2013
While I respect where Ms. Santo is coming from I can't sit by and not address some issues she neglected.  If every life begins at conception - where is that support when that baby is born? It is one thing to say every life is sacred and then stand by silently while WIC is gutted and Head Start is defunded and child care is difficult to find and in some cases out of reach for the working class. Where are all of these day-to-day supports that these children will need? Where is the prenatal care for the uninsured pregnant mother when Planned Parenthood has had to close so many of its doors?
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor | September 19, 1990
The Francis Scott Key Medical Center plans to open a novel clinic aimed at getting pregnant addicts off drugs and preventing injury to their babies -- in some cases, by admitting the women for extended stays through their pregnancy, delivery and postpartum period.Aside from treating their addiction, Key's Center for Addiction and Pregnancy will offer women a host of prenatal and psychiatric services under the same roof in an attempt to fight the tendency of many addicts to ignore their health -- and their babies' -- until they go into labor.
NEWS
By Deidre Nerreau McCabe and Deidre Nerreau McCabe,Staff Writer | October 24, 1992
Maryland corporations could save themselves millions of dollars in health-care costs by getting involved in the fight against infant mortality, business leaders were told yesterday at the state's first conference on the issue.About 11 of every 1,000 babies born in Maryland die before their first birthday -- a rate slightly higher than the national average. Countless others born with health problems may survive only because of extraordinary medical attention. The cost, business leaders were told, is staggering:* In 1991, Maryland employers spent almost $30 million to cover uncompensated health-care costs for mothers and their babies.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Sun Staff | September 29, 1995
Maryland's infant mortality rate, for many years among the worst in the nation, fell 11 percent last year to a record low.The state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, which released new figures yesterday, credited programs that have discouraged teen-age pregnancy, ushered low-income women into prenatal care, and raised awareness of sudden infant death syndrome."
NEWS
By Heather Dewar and Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | August 1, 2003
City officials say the latest round of state budget cuts will hurt some of Baltimore's neediest residents, including pregnant women and infants, families living on minimum-wage jobs and drug addicts awaiting treatment. Dr. Peter L. Beilenson, the city health commissioner, said the Health Department has decided to eliminate a new program that provides prenatal care and counseling to chronically ill or drug-addicted women. Beilenson credits the program with reducing the city's infant mortality rate to its lowest level ever, but he said it had to go to make up for $552,000 in cuts to the department's operating funds.
NEWS
March 2, 2010
I read with interest the article about former Mayor Sheila Dixon stepping back into the spotlight ("In public return, Dixon dwells on achievements," Feb. 25). She was promoting some of her pet causes -- one of which was prenatal care. Ms. Dixon signed the bill (that our current Mayor Stephanie C. Rawlings-Blake sponsored in the City Council) requiring all pregnancy centers in Baltimore to post a sign that tells those walking into these centers what they don't provide -- abortion referrals.
BUSINESS
By Sylvia Porter and Sylvia Porter,1991 Los Angeles Times Syndicate | April 9, 1991
The figures are tragic, embarrassing and unnecessary. The United States, with the most advanced and expensive health-care system in the world, ranks a deplorable 25th in infant deaths. The majority of these deaths are due to premature or low-weight births. Women under 18 or over 35, those who smoke, abuse alcohol or other drugs, or those with chronic illnesses or conditions such as diabetes and high blood pressure are at increased risk of delivering prematurely.Aside from the human toll, the costs associated with caring for low-birth weight babies are staggering.
NEWS
July 12, 2012
Regarding columnist Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s commentary on the Supreme Court's decision to uphold the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, it's worth noting the success of the Healthcare for All law enacted by Mitt Romney when he was governor of Massachusetts ("Constitutional - but contemptible," July 8). With 98.1 percent of its citizens covered, Massachusetts has the highest rate of medically insured residents in the nation. And due to preventive care for patients with preexisting conditions such as high blood pressure and diabetes, there are fewer emergency room visits by patients who were using emergency care for routine matters.
NEWS
August 29, 2011
Kudos to all the programs that have contributed to the reduction in infant mortality in Baltimore. ("Md. infant mortality hits record low," August 24). I would like to mention two highly effective programs: Family Support Centers and Home Visiting programs, both of which build trusting relationships within communities in order to effectively engage women in prenatal care and partner with new mothers to ensure that their infants thrive. Located in five Baltimore neighborhoods with high rates of teen parenting and poverty, Family Support Centers reach out to pregnant women and new parents, engaging them in programs/services that increase the odds for child health and well-being.
NEWS
July 27, 2011
Social conservatives have recently gone into fits over a report released last week recommending that insurance coverage include free access to birth control as preventive care for women under President Barack Obama's health care overhaul. That insuring preventive care whenever possible - and thus saving far greater sums associated with unwanted pregnancy - might be construed as a bad thing defies reason, of course, but it's par for the ever-shallow national health care debate. It's no surprise that certain religious groups are upset because they perceive contraception as sinful.
HEALTH
By Raven L. Hill, The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2011
Women in the Baltimore area will soon hear radio ads urging prenatal care as local health officials continue efforts to stem high minority infant mortality rates. Black infants in the Baltimore area are nearly twice as likely to die as white babies, according to state health statistics from 2009. The state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene has given Baltimore County grants — including $84,000 last year and $30,000 this year — for programs and informational campaigns aimed at lowering the rate.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | meredith.cohn@baltsun.com | March 13, 2010
Aiming to cut down on the high number of premature births in Maryland and across the nation, a new program will offer words of advice for pregnant women and new mothers in a place that will be hard to miss: their cell phones. The free text messages will be sent every week, and will include information about such things as seeing the doctor, avoiding alcohol and cigarettes, and eating properly. And while it's just rolling out in Maryland, the program, called text4baby, has more than 18,000 women signed up for what's expected to be the largest nationwide health initiative using mobile phones.
NEWS
March 2, 2010
I read with interest the article about former Mayor Sheila Dixon stepping back into the spotlight ("In public return, Dixon dwells on achievements," Feb. 25). She was promoting some of her pet causes -- one of which was prenatal care. Ms. Dixon signed the bill (that our current Mayor Stephanie C. Rawlings-Blake sponsored in the City Council) requiring all pregnancy centers in Baltimore to post a sign that tells those walking into these centers what they don't provide -- abortion referrals.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | April 12, 2014
When Trena Williams was charged last fall with first-degree murder and held without bail, she was four months pregnant. Behind bars, inmates get prenatal care. So when the charges were later reduced to accessory after the fact and she was released on home detention, Circuit Judge Stephen J. Sfekas ordered Williams, 29, to receive prenatal care as one of the conditions of her release. But even after she'd given birth to a healthy baby girl, prosecutors wanted proof that Williams had received care during her pregnancy, threatening her with jail time if she didn't comply.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Sun reporter | March 7, 2008
The current decade hasn't been kind to Maryland's babies, with rising percentages born underweight or dying in infancy, according to a report by Advocates for Children & Youth. Meanwhile, declining percentages of women were entering prenatal care early in their pregnancies, according to the most recent data, depriving them of care needed to stave off bad outcomes. "It's a great concern that infant health is declining, given that Maryland already ranks so poorly in infant health nationally," Matthew Joseph, executive director of the nonprofit agency, said yesterday.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper | julie.scharper@baltsun.com | February 25, 2010
Three weeks after resigning as mayor in a cloud of scandal, Sheila Dixon was back in the spotlight Wednesday night. Speaking at a panel discussion sponsored by the Investigative Voice Web site, Dixon promoted some of her pet causes - gun control, the environment, prenatal care - and her accomplishments in office. "Part of what I was attempting to do was to focus on those systemic issues," said Dixon. "So when we talk about cleaner, greener, healthier, safer cities, it wasn't just buzz words."
NEWS
By Julie Scharper and Baltimore Sun reporter | February 24, 2010
Three weeks after resigning as mayor in a cloud of scandal, Sheila Dixon was back in the spotlight Wednesday night. Speaking at a panel discussion sponsored by the Investigative Voice web site, Dixon touted some of her pet causes-- gun control, the environment, prenatal care-- and the accomplishments of her regime. "Part of what i was attempting to do was to focus on those systemic issues," said Dixon. "So when we talk about cleaner greener healthier safer cities, it wasn't just buzz words."
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