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By Judy Foreman and Judy Foreman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 13, 2005
I was in the hospital for knee surgery and got a terrible rash on my back. The nurses said it was probably from chemicals used to launder the sheets. Is this true? It could be. These rashes happen "with enough frequency that we do see it. They're often due to the high amounts of bleach and whitening agents in the detergent" used in hospital laundering, said Dr. John Williams, a dermatologist at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston. Commercial laundries use much harsher chemicals than people use at home, he said, and these agents can cause contact dermatitis, a rash that in most cases is simply a reaction to an irritating substance but 20 percent of the time is a genuine allergic reaction, in which immune cells gear up to fight the offending substance.
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NEWS
By Judy Foreman and Judy Foreman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 13, 2005
I was in the hospital for knee surgery and got a terrible rash on my back. The nurses said it was probably from chemicals used to launder the sheets. Is this true? It could be. These rashes happen "with enough frequency that we do see it. They're often due to the high amounts of bleach and whitening agents in the detergent" used in hospital laundering, said Dr. John Williams, a dermatologist at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston. Commercial laundries use much harsher chemicals than people use at home, he said, and these agents can cause contact dermatitis, a rash that in most cases is simply a reaction to an irritating substance but 20 percent of the time is a genuine allergic reaction, in which immune cells gear up to fight the offending substance.
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FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis and Dr. Simeon Margolis,Special to The Sun | July 4, 1995
Q: I have tried many different remedies but continue to be terribly irritable before each menstrual period. Is it true that there is a new treatment for this problem?A: A recent article in the New England Journal of Medicine reported the results of a Canadian study on the treatment of premenstrual syndrome with fluoxetine (Prozac). Surveys have shown that between 3 percent and 8 percent of North American women suffer from premenstrual syndrome. Symptoms, which may begin seven to 10 days before menstrual periods and end soon after the onset of menstrual flow, include increased tension, irritability, agitation, difficulty sleeping and fatigue.
NEWS
By Mark Schwed and Mark Schwed,Cox News Service | November 21, 2004
Killer mood swings. Hormones gone haywire. Hair-trigger tempers. Uncontrollable crying. Bloating. For eons, women have suffered the inconvenience, the indignation and the pain of premenstrual syndrome -- PMS. They've put up with the jokes, the mocking, the misunderstanding. And no matter how much they tried to explain what they were feeling, men just didn't get it. Until, maybe, now. Scientists studying herds of lusty rams in Scotland and a psychotherapist surveying modern man in America have come up with a startling conclusion, one that may have women dancing for joy. Men get PMS-ish, too. Millions of men. "It's payback time," says Jed Diamond, a California psychotherapist and author of the groundbreaking Male Meno-pause.
FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis | May 28, 1991
Q: I have been told by my doctor to take vitamin B-6, but no more than 150 mg a day because overdoses of this vitamin can cause nerve damage. What is the nerve damage and what are jTC the symptoms of it?A: The B vitamins had always been considered extremely safeeven in large amounts, until 1983, when scientists reported seven adults who developed severe abnormalities of their sensory nervous system while taking large doses of vitamin B-6 (pyridoxine). These individuals had taken 2 to 6 grams of B-6 daily for periods from two months to more than three years.
NEWS
By Mark Schwed and Mark Schwed,Cox News Service | November 21, 2004
Killer mood swings. Hormones gone haywire. Hair-trigger tempers. Uncontrollable crying. Bloating. For eons, women have suffered the inconvenience, the indignation and the pain of premenstrual syndrome -- PMS. They've put up with the jokes, the mocking, the misunderstanding. And no matter how much they tried to explain what they were feeling, men just didn't get it. Until, maybe, now. Scientists studying herds of lusty rams in Scotland and a psychotherapist surveying modern man in America have come up with a startling conclusion, one that may have women dancing for joy. Men get PMS-ish, too. Millions of men. "It's payback time," says Jed Diamond, a California psychotherapist and author of the groundbreaking Male Meno-pause.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer | February 1, 1998
RESEARCHERS are now saying that PMS -- premenstrual syndrome -- is not a psychiatric disorder but one caused by the negative effects of a woman's hormones on her brain, and I'd just like to welcome them to the party.Where have you been, boys?Are any of you married? Know any women?Medical scientists have apparently taken the blindfolds off and can see what has been in front of them all along. It is an elephant, gentleman. And for five or six days out of every month, you can find it sitting on my nerves.
FEATURES
By Jane E. Brody and Jane E. Brody,N.Y. TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 3, 1996
Virtually every woman who ovulates experiences premenstrual changes that three-fourths of women recognize as an impending period. For many, these changes involve symptoms, like breast tenderness, bloating or food cravings, that may be annoying or discomforting but do not disrupt their lives.Sometimes, however, the physical symptoms of premenstrual syndrome, popularly called PMS, are disturbing enough to prompt women to seek relief. Although women differ in how well they tolerate premenstrual discomfort, it is not "all in their heads."
FEATURES
By Universal Press Syndicate | August 4, 1992
It's not that hard to relaxTaking a nice hot bath or a long walk appears to give you just as much relief from stress and anxiety as any fancy meditation technique. So says a recent report from the National Academy of Sciences. Report contributor Gerald Davison, a psychologist from the University of Southern California, found no evidence that meditation techniques, which generally involve the repetition of a key word or phrase called a mantra, reduce stress or blood pressure any better than taking a walk on a regular basis or simply "hanging out" at home.
NEWS
By Newsday | June 16, 1991
WASHINGTON -- America's first successful criminal defense based on premenstrual syndrome may have helped a Virginia surgeon avoid a drunken-driving conviction, but it has also revived controversy over the validity of making a courtroom issue of the monthly physical and psychological changes reported by many women."
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer | February 1, 1998
RESEARCHERS are now saying that PMS -- premenstrual syndrome -- is not a psychiatric disorder but one caused by the negative effects of a woman's hormones on her brain, and I'd just like to welcome them to the party.Where have you been, boys?Are any of you married? Know any women?Medical scientists have apparently taken the blindfolds off and can see what has been in front of them all along. It is an elephant, gentleman. And for five or six days out of every month, you can find it sitting on my nerves.
FEATURES
By Jane E. Brody and Jane E. Brody,N.Y. TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 3, 1996
Virtually every woman who ovulates experiences premenstrual changes that three-fourths of women recognize as an impending period. For many, these changes involve symptoms, like breast tenderness, bloating or food cravings, that may be annoying or discomforting but do not disrupt their lives.Sometimes, however, the physical symptoms of premenstrual syndrome, popularly called PMS, are disturbing enough to prompt women to seek relief. Although women differ in how well they tolerate premenstrual discomfort, it is not "all in their heads."
FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis and Dr. Simeon Margolis,Special to The Sun | July 4, 1995
Q: I have tried many different remedies but continue to be terribly irritable before each menstrual period. Is it true that there is a new treatment for this problem?A: A recent article in the New England Journal of Medicine reported the results of a Canadian study on the treatment of premenstrual syndrome with fluoxetine (Prozac). Surveys have shown that between 3 percent and 8 percent of North American women suffer from premenstrual syndrome. Symptoms, which may begin seven to 10 days before menstrual periods and end soon after the onset of menstrual flow, include increased tension, irritability, agitation, difficulty sleeping and fatigue.
FEATURES
By Universal Press Syndicate | August 4, 1992
It's not that hard to relaxTaking a nice hot bath or a long walk appears to give you just as much relief from stress and anxiety as any fancy meditation technique. So says a recent report from the National Academy of Sciences. Report contributor Gerald Davison, a psychologist from the University of Southern California, found no evidence that meditation techniques, which generally involve the repetition of a key word or phrase called a mantra, reduce stress or blood pressure any better than taking a walk on a regular basis or simply "hanging out" at home.
FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis | May 28, 1991
Q: I have been told by my doctor to take vitamin B-6, but no more than 150 mg a day because overdoses of this vitamin can cause nerve damage. What is the nerve damage and what are jTC the symptoms of it?A: The B vitamins had always been considered extremely safeeven in large amounts, until 1983, when scientists reported seven adults who developed severe abnormalities of their sensory nervous system while taking large doses of vitamin B-6 (pyridoxine). These individuals had taken 2 to 6 grams of B-6 daily for periods from two months to more than three years.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | July 5, 1995
The tranquilizer Xanax can relieve the tension, irritability and aches of severe premenstrual syndrome, University of Pennsylvania Medical Center researchers say.Their study, published in Wednesday's issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association, also found that the hormone progesterone is not particularly effective in treating PMS, even though it has been widely prescribed for that purpose for more than a decade.Coming on the heels of a study that found Prozac can help with severe PMS, the new research offers yet more insight into the hormonal and nervous system interactions that trigger the mysterious malady.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith | May 12, 1992
As women try to decide whether to try hormone replacement therapy, they should weigh the risks and benefits according to their own health, their family history and their symptoms of menopause.In "The Silent Passage: Menopause," journalist Gail Sheehy provides a list of hormone therapy pros and cons which women should consider and discuss with their physicians.Risks* Possible increased risk of cancer of the uterus.* Unknown associations with breast cancer.* Continued menstruation possible.
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