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NEWS
July 30, 2014
Susan Reimer 's op-ed about a peaceful demonstration in Annapolis lacked any substance. She repeatedly referred to the demonstrators as "hateful" without quoting a single hateful remark ( "Hate-filled immigration demonstration hits home," July 23). Instead of even attempting to analyze the arguments of the demonstrators about securing the borders or even attempting to make a rational counter argument, she calls them names and says that they hate "other people's children. " Was there a sign that said that they hate children?
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NEWS
By David Horsey | August 15, 2014
The killing of a young black man by a police officer in Ferguson, Mo., and the subsequent military-style police response to protests has illuminated two very disturbing phenomena. One is older than our republic -- racial prejudice -- and the other is relatively new -- the militarization of America's cops. Generally, I have great sympathy for police. They get stuck dealing with all the bad consequences of our shameful failure to deal with numerous social ills, from mental health to poverty.
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NEWS
By Norman Gelman | June 14, 2012
It's time for someone to say it aloud. As a member of the Maryland Commission on Civil Rights for more than a decade and its chairman for much of that time, I'm willing to take the risk of being misunderstood. African-Americans are no longer the principal targets of discrimination. Notice I said "discrimination," not prejudice. In the universe of laws to enforce equal opportunity, discrimination is easy to allege but difficult to prove. And prejudice doesn't exactly matter. Corporate America and a good many small organizations have learned how to fire employees without violating anti-discrimination statutes.
NEWS
July 30, 2014
Susan Reimer 's op-ed about a peaceful demonstration in Annapolis lacked any substance. She repeatedly referred to the demonstrators as "hateful" without quoting a single hateful remark ( "Hate-filled immigration demonstration hits home," July 23). Instead of even attempting to analyze the arguments of the demonstrators about securing the borders or even attempting to make a rational counter argument, she calls them names and says that they hate "other people's children. " Was there a sign that said that they hate children?
FEATURES
By Michael Dresser | December 23, 1990
In a perverse way, prejudice can be a wonderful thing -- a long as you don't share in it.Simply put, bias means bargains. The canny consumer who consistently defies wrongheaded popular notions of what is classy and what is crude will enjoy quality and value his conventional cousins will never know.That's especially true with wine. It's a field fraught with prejudice, not just the fatuous pronouncements of self-styled experts, but also the unspoken stereotypes that linger in our minds in spite of ourselves.
NEWS
By David Horsey | August 15, 2014
The killing of a young black man by a police officer in Ferguson, Mo., and the subsequent military-style police response to protests has illuminated two very disturbing phenomena. One is older than our republic -- racial prejudice -- and the other is relatively new -- the militarization of America's cops. Generally, I have great sympathy for police. They get stuck dealing with all the bad consequences of our shameful failure to deal with numerous social ills, from mental health to poverty.
FEATURES
By Ben Kubasik and Ben Kubasik,Newsday | April 24, 1992
New York -- Peter Jennings, ABC anchor, doesn't take kindly to the idea that he, a journalist, might be perceived as performing a teaching-preaching role normally reserved for a cleric. This, even as Mr. Jennings prepares to advance the news business' growing preoccupation with moral and ethical issues in four hours of ABC specials on the subjects of prejudice and rape.The three specials are: Saturday's 90-minute "Prejudice: Answering Children's Questions" (11:30 a.m. EDT); an hourlong "Peter Jennings Reporting: Men, Sex and Rape" (May 5)
FEATURES
By Ben Kubasik and Ben Kubasik,Newsday | April 24, 1992
New York -- Peter Jennings, ABC anchor, doesn't take kindly to the idea that he, a journalist, might be perceived as performing a teaching-preaching role normally reserved for a cleric.This, even as Mr. Jennings prepares to advance the news business' growing preoccupation with moral and ethical issues in four hours of ABC specials on the subjects of prejudice and rape.The three specials are: Saturday's 90-minute "Prejudice: Answering Children's Questions" (11:30 a.m. EDT); an hourlong "Peter Jennings Reporting: Men, Sex and Rape" (May 5)
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Staff Writer | March 22, 1993
Being a Caucasian in Mount Airy wouldn't appear to give Kathryn "Katie" Bucher an insider's perspective on prejudice. But looks aren't everything.Some of Katie's inspiration to write a winning essay, "Prejudice: Still a Problem," came from having an older brother who is autistic and seeing how some people react to him, she said.Katie's essay won her $100 from the Mount Airy Lions Club essay contest, and she won on two more levels before being selected Western Maryland regional winner.She is 13, and attends seventh grade at Mount Airy Middle School.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 5, 2000
NORWOOD, Mass. - Walk in Deidra Everett's shoes a moment: You know that you dress nicely, that you are well-spoken, that you are clean and friendly and funny and smart. Yet when you go for a job interview, your potential employer's eyes tend to sweep your person and fill with horror. You can joke about it - "The Look" - but it has happened so many times that you have almost given up. The unemployment rate in Massachusetts is under 3 percent. Your office administration skills are in desperate demand.
NEWS
April 18, 2014
Kevin Kallaugher's cartoon on LBJ's legacy is so far off the mark that it fails to be remotely humorous ( "Dogged opposition," April 13). He uses two presidents, each tainted by their racism and prejudice, to paint the tea party as racist. Lyndon B. Johnson was morally bankrupt, accepting a Silver Star and wearing it the rest of his life when, in truth, he never earned it. The Silver Star is only earned for valor in combat, and LBJ was never in combat. He served briefly in the Pacific Theatre of World War II but was never exposed to enemy contact.
NEWS
By John McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2013
The idiotic journalistic prejudice against inverting subject and verb in attribution comes to full flower in this sentence from a Reuters dispatch:  Past studies have pegged the annual cost of treating those infections at $20 billion to $40 billion, so the new numbers show progress is being made, Dr. Eyal Zimlichman of the Center for Patient Safety Research and Practice at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, one of the new study's authors,...
NEWS
July 15, 2013
The trial of George Zimmerman in the shooting death of unarmed Florida teen Trayvon Martin failed in every way. It failed to bring forth anything resembling objective truth about what happened the night Mr. Zimmerman, a neighborhood watch volunteer, decided Mr. Martin looked suspicious and took the law into his hands. It failed to bring anything like closure to a nation that had been horrified by the senseless death of a young man who had done nothing wrong. And it failed most spectacularly to provide any measure of justice.
NEWS
By F. Michael Higginbotham | June 6, 2013
Affirmative action in higher education raises difficult questions of access and fairness. Opponents argue that it discriminates against whites and certain other groups, while proponents emphasize that it increases opportunities for underrepresented minorities. Though concerns about fairness properly limit the scope and frequency of affirmative action, minority underrepresentation in highly selective colleges and universities continues to validate its use. For almost 40 years, the Supreme Court has grappled with challenges to the scope and validity of race-based affirmative action programs.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2013
With her latest production, Annapolis Shakespeare Company founder and artistic director Sally Boyett-D'Angelo is expanding the young company's horizons, both artistically and physically. At a recent rehearsal of Jon Jory's adaptation of Jane Austen's "Pride and Prejudice," Boyett-D'Angelo announced the company will soon move to recently acquired space for rehearsals, offices, a costume shop and a performance studio, at 111 Chinquapin Round Road. It's the latest advancement under Boyett-D'Angelo's guidance.
NEWS
By Stephen H. Sachs | February 25, 2013
February is Black History Month. Baltimore is celebrating it by commemorating the march of African-Americans toward full membership in the American family. Although I am a white man born and raised in the strictly segregated Baltimore of nearly eight decades ago, I am joining that celebration. The apartheid Baltimore in which I grew up has been thoroughly chronicled by C. Fraser Smith's "Here Lies Jim Crow," Antero Pietila's "Not in My Neighborhood" and Larry Gibson's "Young Thurgood.
NEWS
By Jeffrey Fleishman and Jeffrey Fleishman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 13, 2003
BERLIN - In a country where the constitution is a paean to political correctness but where prejudice remains evident, Axel Honneth packed his pipe with plum-scented tobacco and ventured into the tricky realm of Germany's struggle with racial tolerance. "Germans have a certain joy about cultural plurality, but then there's this other intriguing thing," said Honneth, a philosophy professor at Goethe University in Frankfurt. "A colleague of mine lives in a village. He feels irritated by the Turks in the neighborhood.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | March 13, 1999
Setting aside regular classes, eighth-graders at Sudbrook Magnet Middle School spent the past two weeks studying a topic that is part of their lives every day: prejudice."
NEWS
September 18, 2012
I noticed that one of your letter writers took umbrage at Dan Rodricks ' characterization of opposition to marriage equality as an "irrational fear" ("Is half the country gripped by 'irrational fear?" Sept. 14). I don't agree that because half the country hates gay people, that somehow makes it less irrational. How would someone who makes such a dubious claim prefer his motives be described? Irrational hatred? Irrational prejudice? I'd be interested in knowing. When you get down to the crux of the issue, it doesn't really matter what word you use to describe prejudice against gay couples.
NEWS
By Dawinder S. Sidhu | August 6, 2012
We do not yet know for certain what motivated a gunman to open fire on a Sikh temple in Wisconsin Sunday, killing six and wounding many others. But we do know that the Sikh community in America - for no reason other than its members' appearance - has suffered extensive harassment, prejudice and violence in the years since the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. Sunday's shooting was a tragedy, but it offers Americans an opportunity to learn about the Sikh community and to quell the ignorance that may have enabled the shooting to occur in the first place.
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