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NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | July 9, 1996
Dr. Henry Foster, President Clinton's never-withdrawn nominee for surgeon general, told a Baltimore audience yesterday that efforts to bring down the U.S. teen pregnancy rate are being hampered by a "conservative element" that "preaches that knowledge is dangerous."Foster, whose nomination was derailed by a Republican-led filibuster last year over his performing of abortions, said teachers are "browbeaten and harassed" when they try to teach adolescents about sexuality.Partly as a result, he said, the U.S. teen birth and abortion rates remain many times higher than in other industrialized nations -- even those where girls on average become sexually active at an earlier age. In most of those countries, "family life" programs are integral parts of elementary and secondary school curriculum, he said.
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NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | June 27, 2008
BOSTON - Well now, isn't that a relief. The infamous "pregnancy pact" at Gloucester High School turns out to be an urban legend. The media mobs that descended on the fishing town may now pack up their cameras and their moral outrage. It's all over, folks. Except for the 17 Gloucester girls in the late stages of pregnancy or early stages of motherhood. And except, of course, for the 140,000 other American girls between 15 and 17 who'll be having their own babies this year. Let us review the feeding frenzy that seemed to please so many palates.
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NEWS
October 25, 1990
The newest figures are two years old, but they are ominous nonetheless: In 1988, more than 5,500 Baltimore city teen-agers became pregnant; over 3,000 gave birth. And there is little reason to suspect the numbers have changed very much since. There are perhaps as many reasons for teen pregnancy as there are teen-agers who become pregnant. But the underlying problem is this: These adolescents are either ignorant about birth control, or they don't know how to get it and use it.Now the city Health Department has embarked on a wise, albeit controversial, course: It has begun distributing birth control pills and condoms through on-site health clinics at seven city schools.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Sun Reporter | April 27, 2008
Americans may never agree on the abortion issue. But one thing remains clear: Fewer women are having them, a trend that has persisted through Democratic and Republican administrations, divisive election campaigns and the underlying culture wars. A report this month from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows the trend in stark numbers: Between 1990 and 2004, the estimated abortion rate declined by 24 percent. In no single year did the rate even inch upward. "It's been dropping since the late '80s, especially for teenagers but for all age groups too," said Stephanie J. Ventura, head of the reproductive statistics branch at the CDC's National Center for Health Statistics.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 20, 2004
A new, state-by-state breakdown of teen-age pregnancy and abortion rates in 2000 shows declines among all racial and ethnic groups and in every state, continuing a decade-long downward trend that researchers attribute to better contraception and less, or more cautious, sexual activity. Overall, the national pregnancy rate declined by 2 percent between 1999 and 2000, and fell by 28 percent from its 1990 peak, according to data compiled by the Alan Guttmacher Institute, a research organization that supports abortion rights Nationwide, one-third of pregnancies among 15- to 19-year-olds ended in abortion in 2000, and the rate of abortions per 1,000 women in that age group declined to 24, down from a high of 43.5 per 1,000 in the late 1980s.
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | June 27, 2008
BOSTON - Well now, isn't that a relief. The infamous "pregnancy pact" at Gloucester High School turns out to be an urban legend. The media mobs that descended on the fishing town may now pack up their cameras and their moral outrage. It's all over, folks. Except for the 17 Gloucester girls in the late stages of pregnancy or early stages of motherhood. And except, of course, for the 140,000 other American girls between 15 and 17 who'll be having their own babies this year. Let us review the feeding frenzy that seemed to please so many palates.
NEWS
By Sandy Banisky and Sandy Banisky,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 23, 1996
TIPTON, Ind. -- The seat of Tipton County has a picturesque stone courthouse, a middle-income, church-going population, a small-town friendliness -- and a teen pregnancy rate that rivals Baltimore's.As members of the Teen Pregnancy Coalition formed two years ago to fight the problem, they adopted a theory that's discussed more and more: Americans have become too accepting of high-school motherhood."The overreaction was dad standing in the doorway and the girl in rags shivering in the cold with her baby," says Mark Anderson, associate pastor of Tipton's West Street Christian Church.
NEWS
May 12, 1997
Banks value customers who pay bills on timeI can only imagine that Sun reporter Robert A. Erlandson was taking exceptional poetic license when he wrote (Perspective section, April 24) that people who pay their bills on time are considered deadbeats.His provocative statement is one of those ill-conceived urban myths, like alligators in New York sewers, that is so out of line it gets repeated by people who don't take time to investigate the facts.Many, many valued bank card customers choose to pay their balances in full every month, thus receiving free use of bank funds.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Sun Reporter | April 27, 2008
Americans may never agree on the abortion issue. But one thing remains clear: Fewer women are having them, a trend that has persisted through Democratic and Republican administrations, divisive election campaigns and the underlying culture wars. A report this month from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows the trend in stark numbers: Between 1990 and 2004, the estimated abortion rate declined by 24 percent. In no single year did the rate even inch upward. "It's been dropping since the late '80s, especially for teenagers but for all age groups too," said Stephanie J. Ventura, head of the reproductive statistics branch at the CDC's National Center for Health Statistics.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | December 31, 1995
Howard County health and social service officials are voicing concerns that risky sexual behavior is threatening the welfare of the county's youth.The available data show a decline in county teen-age birth, pregnancy and abortion rates, but local officials say the numbers are misleading."
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | December 30, 2004
Baltimore's teen birth rate, although still much higher than the national average, has reached its lowest level since the city started keeping records more than 100 years ago, health officials will announce today. The percentage of teenage girls having babies has dropped more quickly in Baltimore than in the nation as a whole since 1991, when the number most recently peaked. Seven percent of Baltimore girls ages 15 to 19 gave birth last year, down from 11.7 percent in 1991, a reduction of 40 percent.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | December 30, 2004
Baltimore's teen birth rate, although still much higher than the national average, has reached its lowest level since the city started keeping records more than 100 years ago, health officials will announce today. The percentage of teenage girls having babies has dropped more quickly in Baltimore than in the nation as a whole since 1991, when the number most recently peaked. Seven percent of Baltimore girls ages 15 to 19 gave birth last year, down from 11.7 percent in 1991, a reduction of 40 percent.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 20, 2004
A new, state-by-state breakdown of teen-age pregnancy and abortion rates in 2000 shows declines among all racial and ethnic groups and in every state, continuing a decade-long downward trend that researchers attribute to better contraception and less, or more cautious, sexual activity. Overall, the national pregnancy rate declined by 2 percent between 1999 and 2000, and fell by 28 percent from its 1990 peak, according to data compiled by the Alan Guttmacher Institute, a research organization that supports abortion rights Nationwide, one-third of pregnancies among 15- to 19-year-olds ended in abortion in 2000, and the rate of abortions per 1,000 women in that age group declined to 24, down from a high of 43.5 per 1,000 in the late 1980s.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | February 27, 1999
Researchers working in an impoverished region of Nepal may have found a simple, low-cost way to sharply reduce the risk of death among childbearing women -- weekly vitamin supplements.Capsules containing vitamin A and beta carotene were effective in reducing maternal death by 40 percent or more, according to scientists at the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health who collaborated with Nepalese health agencies.Beta carotene, a chemical that the body turns into vitamin A, is normally supplied by vegetables such as carrots and beets.
NEWS
By Megan Kennedy and Megan Kennedy,contributing writer | February 21, 1999
After giving birth, a 19-year-old Baltimore resident headed to Planned Parenthood and got her first injection of the contraceptive Depo-Provera. One year later, she "likes Depo because I don't have time to remember to take the pill."This young mother is one of the many teens who are finding Depo-Provera a more convenient, more reliable method of birth control. In fact, family planning counselors say the reason teen pregnancy rates have dropped in both Baltimore and the nation is due, in part, to Depo-Provera.
NEWS
December 23, 1998
A NEW FEDERAL study presents promising evidence that the nation has at last found a formidable way to assist teen-age mothers and to help prevent pregnancy in the first place.The National Center for Health Statistics reports that not only are teen pregnancies on the decline -- continuing an eight-year trend -- but that young mothers are less likely to have a second child, a statistic which represents something of a breakthrough.This is significant because one birth to a teen-ager is hardship enough on her and her family; a second child compounds their problems.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN STAFF | November 25, 1996
Vivian E. Washington is diminutive, a dignified woman with a delicate voice. Her priest calls her a bulldozer.For 30 years she has resolutely pushed out of the way any obstructions that lay between her and her plans to help pregnant teen-agers build a life for themselves. She tells her story in a warble, inflected by a soft laugh when the harsh or improbable parts come up."I was assistant principal at Clifton Park Junior High," she says, "and because I was a woman, I was in charge of the girls.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | December 30, 2004
Baltimore's teen birth rate, although still much higher than the national average, has reached its lowest level since the city started keeping records more than 100 years ago, health officials will announce today. The percentage of teenage girls having babies has dropped more quickly in Baltimore than in the nation as a whole since 1991, when the number most recently peaked. Seven percent of Baltimore girls ages 15 to 19 gave birth last year, down from 11.7 percent in 1991, a reduction of 40 percent.
NEWS
May 12, 1997
Banks value customers who pay bills on timeI can only imagine that Sun reporter Robert A. Erlandson was taking exceptional poetic license when he wrote (Perspective section, April 24) that people who pay their bills on time are considered deadbeats.His provocative statement is one of those ill-conceived urban myths, like alligators in New York sewers, that is so out of line it gets repeated by people who don't take time to investigate the facts.Many, many valued bank card customers choose to pay their balances in full every month, thus receiving free use of bank funds.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN STAFF | November 25, 1996
Vivian E. Washington is diminutive, a dignified woman with a delicate voice. Her priest calls her a bulldozer.For 30 years she has resolutely pushed out of the way any obstructions that lay between her and her plans to help pregnant teen-agers build a life for themselves. She tells her story in a warble, inflected by a soft laugh when the harsh or improbable parts come up."I was assistant principal at Clifton Park Junior High," she says, "and because I was a woman, I was in charge of the girls.
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