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NEWS
April 11, 2014
While Stan Ber is correct that Ray Rice only has been indicted, not convicted for the offense of domestic violence, I am puzzled why he hopes that Rice avoids prison time. In recent months, athletes, entertainers, military personnel, and the heir to the DuPont fortune, have received slaps on the wrist for violence against women. (Just today, Minnesota Timberwolves player, Dante Cunningham was accused of choking hs girlfriend).  If Rice is convicted but avoids prison, most Ravens fans will cheer for him, ignoring his offense.  While athletes and entertainers should not be punished solely because of their status, neither should they be given preferential treatment by the courts compared to non-celebrities convicted of similar crimes.
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NEWS
May 19, 2014
One of the marvels of the Internet to date is that it's largely been a level playing field where there is equal access to all (at least those not blocked by oppressive governments), an arrangement that has not only encouraged innovation and investment but greatly benefited ordinary consumers. U.S. officials keep claiming to support so-called "net neutrality," but interpretations of what that means seem to vary widely. At least that explains how last week the Federal Communications Commission could issue rules that reportedly uphold net neutrality but also raise the possibility of pay-for-preference treatment.
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SPORTS
By Buster Olney and Buster Olney,SUN STAFF | September 25, 1995
MILWAUKEE -- Umpire Durwood Merrill called out Orioles right fielder Kevin Bass on strikes to end yesterday's game, on a pitch that appeared to be well out of the strike zone. Merrill hustled off the field before Bass could say anything to him, but Bass had plenty to say to reporters later.Bass, who played most of his career in the NL, ripped AL umpires, Merrill specifically, comparing them to Los Angeles policemen and saying they give preferential treatment to players who sign autographs for them.
NEWS
April 11, 2014
While Stan Ber is correct that Ray Rice only has been indicted, not convicted for the offense of domestic violence, I am puzzled why he hopes that Rice avoids prison time. In recent months, athletes, entertainers, military personnel, and the heir to the DuPont fortune, have received slaps on the wrist for violence against women. (Just today, Minnesota Timberwolves player, Dante Cunningham was accused of choking hs girlfriend).  If Rice is convicted but avoids prison, most Ravens fans will cheer for him, ignoring his offense.  While athletes and entertainers should not be punished solely because of their status, neither should they be given preferential treatment by the courts compared to non-celebrities convicted of similar crimes.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | April 11, 2000
A Baltimore County judge has ruled that an advocacy group for the blind is not entitled to preferential treatment when the state buys up to $5 million in office supplies. Circuit Judge John F. Fader II said in an opinion released yesterday that the procurement law giving Blind Industries and Services of Maryland preference in state contracts does not apply to the office supply pact that it sought last summer. The law says that the state should buy supplies and services from the agency whenever possible.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | February 13, 2004
A disability rights advocate who was hailed in Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s State of the State address said yesterday that he feels "hurt" and "insulted" after learning that Department of Transportation officials tracked his movements and questioned whether he was getting preferential treatment from a state contractor. Joel D. Myerberg, head of the Maryland Disabilities Forum, said he was outraged by an e-mail in which the assistant to the No. 2 official of the department reported on his activities during a visit to Annapolis and questioned whether Yellow Transportation Inc. was giving him service it denies to others.
NEWS
May 19, 2014
One of the marvels of the Internet to date is that it's largely been a level playing field where there is equal access to all (at least those not blocked by oppressive governments), an arrangement that has not only encouraged innovation and investment but greatly benefited ordinary consumers. U.S. officials keep claiming to support so-called "net neutrality," but interpretations of what that means seem to vary widely. At least that explains how last week the Federal Communications Commission could issue rules that reportedly uphold net neutrality but also raise the possibility of pay-for-preference treatment.
BUSINESS
By Michelle Singletary and Michelle Singletary,Evening Sun Staff | September 30, 1991
Companies in Baltimore can get preferential treatment when bidding on federal contracts because the city has been designated a high-unemployment area.However, such contracts are not widely publicized by the federal government. And even when companies are awarded a "labor surplus" contract they often don't know it's due to a special mandated set-aside.The city is among 1,565 locations in the United States and Puerto Rico that have been classified "labor-surplus areas" for the new fiscal year beginning tomorrow and running through Sept.
NEWS
August 23, 2012
Isn't the purpose of prison to punish offenders and serve as a deterrent to others ("Police get no break in prison," Aug. 20)? And don't police know the law of the land? Serving time in jail is not mandatory, it is the result of the choices people make. If one makes a bad choice then the result is jail time. Why should police officers be given preferential treatment? There is a saying every police officer should know: "If you can't do the time, don't do the crime. " The choice is theirs to make.
NEWS
June 13, 1995
The Supreme Court yesterday dealt what may be a fatal blow to affirmative action by the federal government.It did so by re-interpreting a 1980 decision of the court and explicitly over-ruling a 1990 decision. Conservative justices -- as the five members of the majority all are -- usually accept precedents. Sensitive to anticipated criticism on this score, Justice Sandra Day O'Connor said of the change in the court's tune, "We do not depart from the fabric of the law; we restore it." That led dissenter John Paul Stevens to observe that this invited skepticism.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | March 18, 2013
Anne Arundel County officials on Monday issued a statement denying what they said were "allegations" that former county executive John R. Leopold was receiving special treatment in the county jail, where he is incarcerated for misconduct in office. County Executive Laura Neuman said in a press release that Leopold, 70, who was been jailed since Thursday, was not afforded treatment and accommodations beyond what other inmates can have. "John Leopold has been treated in the same custodial manner as his fellow inmates and has not received preferential treatment," she said.
NEWS
August 23, 2012
Isn't the purpose of prison to punish offenders and serve as a deterrent to others ("Police get no break in prison," Aug. 20)? And don't police know the law of the land? Serving time in jail is not mandatory, it is the result of the choices people make. If one makes a bad choice then the result is jail time. Why should police officers be given preferential treatment? There is a saying every police officer should know: "If you can't do the time, don't do the crime. " The choice is theirs to make.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | March 9, 2005
Dan Rather did it all for love. And if he is guilty of any journalistic sin, it is that of having "too much passion" for the news. That's the core message of Dan Rather: A Reporter Remembers, the one-hour retrospective of Rather's career that is scheduled to air at 8 tonight after he signs off for the last time as anchorman of the CBS Evening News. The producers say they wanted to celebrate Rather's body of work, but instead, what they have created is more video polemic that seeks to justify - or at least explain - the infamous 60 Minutes Wednesday report on George W. Bush that hastened Rather's retirement as anchorman.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,SUN STAFF | February 15, 2005
Jose Canseco's new book focuses largely on steroids, but the retired slugger couldn't resist hurling a few non-steroid-related insults at former Oriole Cal Ripken. "I can just throw up watching the total phonies go to work, guys like Cal Ripken or Alex Rodriguez; everything out of their mouths sounds like it was tested by some kind of focus group beforehand," Canseco writes of the two shortstops. The Cuban-born Canseco suggests in the book that he often was singled out for media criticism because he was a minority.
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 9, 2004
The man who served as George W. Bush's squadron commander in the Texas Air National Guard wrote that Bush was suspended from being a pilot in part because he failed to meet performance standards and that higher-ups were pressuring the commander to "sugar-coat" evaluations of Bush. The squadron leader, Lt. Col. Jerry Killian, wrote about Bush in memos dated 1972 and 1973 that were first reported by CBS News last night during the network's 60 Minutes program and released by the White House later in the evening.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | February 13, 2004
A disability rights advocate who was hailed in Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s State of the State address said yesterday that he feels "hurt" and "insulted" after learning that Department of Transportation officials tracked his movements and questioned whether he was getting preferential treatment from a state contractor. Joel D. Myerberg, head of the Maryland Disabilities Forum, said he was outraged by an e-mail in which the assistant to the No. 2 official of the department reported on his activities during a visit to Annapolis and questioned whether Yellow Transportation Inc. was giving him service it denies to others.
BUSINESS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Evening Sun Staff | July 19, 1991
Seven months into a four-year contract, longshoremen at the Port of Baltimore are accusing management of giving preferential treatment to some work gangs.Officials of International Longshoremen's Association Local 333 took their grievance this week to a federal arbitrator. They allege that three stevedoring companies are not keeping their promise in the contract to make "every effort" to give longshoremen enough hours to receive Guaranteed Annual Income benefits.Under the contract adopted by the locals in December, each longshoreman must work at least 200 hours in two of the last three years in order to receive the GAI money.
NEWS
April 27, 1994
Toward the end of her press conference last week, Hillary Rodham Clinton was asked if she "should have known that Whitewater was not cash flowing and that notes and debts should have been paid [by you], whether Mr. McDougal asked you to pay them or not?" She replied, "Well, shoulda, coulda, woulda, we didn't. . ."James McDougal was the Clintons' partner in the Whitewater investment. Among the accusations made against the Clintons is that money from Mr. McDougal's failing savings and loan were improperly diverted to pay Whitewater debts to the Clintons' advantage.
NEWS
By Ariel Sabar and Ariel Sabar,SUN STAFF | September 21, 2002
The Naval Academy is a kinder, safer and more civil place than it was a half-decade ago, and female and minority midshipmen feel more at home there than did their counterparts in the late 1990s, according to an annual survey of midshipmen released by the military college yesterday. The survey of nearly 3,000 sophomores, juniors and seniors suggests that the school's campaign to teach students manners, toss out vestiges of hazing, and nourish a climate of respect for human dignity is changing perceptions at a school long famous for its macho, sink-or-swim culture.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | February 24, 2002
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. - Ken Griffey used to be one of the most likable guys in the game, but his positive public image has taken a serious pounding since he forced the Seattle Mariners to trade him to the Cincinnati Reds two years ago. Now, it seems, it's open season again. Former teammate Pokey Reese took a few parting shots at the Reds superstar last week, charging that Griffey plays by a different set of team rules than his less-heralded teammates and has failed to play a leadership role in the clubhouse.
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