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By Thomas Healy and Thomas Healy,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 27, 2001
WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court re-entered the debate over affirmative action yesterday, agreeing to consider whether a federal program designed to help minority-owned businesses violates the Constitution. The court's action puts the spotlight once again on a federal highway program that gives incentives to contractors who parcel out work to businesses run by racial minorities and women. And depending on how the justices rule, it could have widespread implications for other race-based preferences at the state and federal level.
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BUSINESS
By Knight-Ridder | May 28, 1991
NEW HAVEN, Conn. -- President Bush plans to extend specia trade preferences to China for another year, saying "it is wrong to isolate China if we hope to influence China."But at the same time, administration officials said Bush, who made the announcement yesterday, would curb high-technology exports to China in retaliation for Beijing's policy of providing long-range missiles to Pakistan. The move also appeared aimed at softening expected congressional opposition to Bush's trade decision.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | June 3, 1998
FOR AFRICAN- Americans and other minorities, another barrier is thrown up each day at the threshold of higher education.Last week, trustees of the City University of New York (CUNY) voted to eliminate remedial classes at the nation's largest urban higher-education system. This followed the demise of affirmative action in public college admissions in Texas and California and ,, the court-ordered end of a blacks-only scholarship program at the University of Maryland, College Park.At first glance, there might seem little in common between the dropping of racial preferences in admissions and the end of open enrollment at CUNY after a closely watched experiment of nearly three decades.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | June 15, 2012
The idea for Woofound came to Joshua Spears while he struggled to plan a blind date. He was looking for things to do and places to eat that matched his and his date's tastes and preferences in a personal way. But there was no app for that. So he and friend Dan Sines, with the fearless ambition typical of 20-somethings, decided last year to build it after hashing out their ideas during a night of fervent instant-messaging. With the release of the Woofound iPhone app this month, the young company took its first big step into a competitive, cutting edge, and sometimes controversial segment of the digital economy: web personalization.
NEWS
By George F. Will | November 17, 1997
WASHINGTON -- The invertebrate condition of some Republicans is suggested by a revision of Major Sullivan Ballou's letter.When Ken Burns' Civil War series appeared on public television, viewers were stirred by Ballou's letter to his wife before Bull Run. Ballou, who died there, wrote of his readiness ''to burn to ashes the hopes of future years, when, God willing, we might still have lived and loved together, and seen our sons grown up to honorable manhood.''...
NEWS
March 28, 2013
The quote from Joshua Thompson of the Pacific Legal Foundation in your recent article on affirmative action is a perfect illustration of the problem ("Affirmative action on docket," March 26). He says that "Michigan voters struck a blow for equal rights by barring government from discriminating or granting preferences by people's skin color or sex. " I'm sorry but I thought, perhaps mistakenly, that equal rights actually meant that everyone had the same rights, and there was no preference nor discrimination.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 6, 1997
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court, after a streak of boldness last term that wiped out five federal laws, is back in town and ready to consider more strong action -- perhaps to strike a crushing blow against preferences in jobs and education based on race or sex.A month after colleges in California and Texas opened with diminished ranks of minorities among their freshmen, the vivid result of bans on affirmative action in those states, the court begins a...
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | October 14, 2006
When Marconi's restaurant closed in June last year, its patrons worried about what would happen to Ali Morsy, the Baltimore institution's beloved waiter who memorized their drink preferences and always knew which people wanted to skip the anchovies in their chopped salads. Morsy took three weeks off last summer and joined the staff of the Capital Grille at Pratt and Gay streets in the Inner Harbor. He says he's busier than ever and helps serve the 400 people who might show up on a packed Saturday night.
NEWS
By Christopher Lord | February 15, 2000
PRAGUE -- The accepted wisdom about the transformation of Eastern Europe over the past decade is that the former communist bloc is moving toward democracy and a market economy. These two terms are used together so often that you might get the idea they are an inseparable double act: Abbott and Costello, Laurel and Hardy, Batman and Robin. But each of these concepts has its difficulties in the post-communist world. With democracy, it is relatively easy to diagnose these difficulties: Crooked politicians paid by crooked businessmen are the biggest problem in many countries, and in others the general failure of democratic politics is an even bigger one. But let's look at the other half of this pairing, and see how the market economy is progressing, and what the structural problems are in adapting.
NEWS
January 25, 2003
A necessary remedy The use of race-based preferences is not only appropriate but necessary in education and all other fields where racially discriminatory practices have unjustly made the playing field uneven. Whites have received preferences in education, employment, housing, the courts and in just about every facet of life for more than 300 years. How, then, does the playing field become level just because we have finally decided to end such practices? Race-based preferences, in certain specific instances can be a viable means by which to attempt to level the field.
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