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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 6, 1997
WASHINGTON -- The Clinton administration will announce a new approach in the awarding of government contracts that may end race-based preferences for some minority-owned businesses while making billions of dollars in federal contracts available for others, officials said yesterday.The new effort reflects a commitment within the administration to preserve some affirmative action programs while complying with court rulings that severely limit them.The revised approach, in proposed Justice Department regulations to be issued this week, will substantially change the rules for awarding federal contracts worth $200 billion a year.
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BUSINESS
By Knight-Ridder | May 28, 1991
NEW HAVEN, Conn. -- President Bush plans to extend specia trade preferences to China for another year, saying "it is wrong to isolate China if we hope to influence China."But at the same time, administration officials said Bush, who made the announcement yesterday, would curb high-technology exports to China in retaliation for Beijing's policy of providing long-range missiles to Pakistan. The move also appeared aimed at softening expected congressional opposition to Bush's trade decision.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | June 3, 1998
FOR AFRICAN- Americans and other minorities, another barrier is thrown up each day at the threshold of higher education.Last week, trustees of the City University of New York (CUNY) voted to eliminate remedial classes at the nation's largest urban higher-education system. This followed the demise of affirmative action in public college admissions in Texas and California and ,, the court-ordered end of a blacks-only scholarship program at the University of Maryland, College Park.At first glance, there might seem little in common between the dropping of racial preferences in admissions and the end of open enrollment at CUNY after a closely watched experiment of nearly three decades.
NEWS
By George F. Will | November 17, 1997
WASHINGTON -- The invertebrate condition of some Republicans is suggested by a revision of Major Sullivan Ballou's letter.When Ken Burns' Civil War series appeared on public television, viewers were stirred by Ballou's letter to his wife before Bull Run. Ballou, who died there, wrote of his readiness ''to burn to ashes the hopes of future years, when, God willing, we might still have lived and loved together, and seen our sons grown up to honorable manhood.''...
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | October 14, 2006
When Marconi's restaurant closed in June last year, its patrons worried about what would happen to Ali Morsy, the Baltimore institution's beloved waiter who memorized their drink preferences and always knew which people wanted to skip the anchovies in their chopped salads. Morsy took three weeks off last summer and joined the staff of the Capital Grille at Pratt and Gay streets in the Inner Harbor. He says he's busier than ever and helps serve the 400 people who might show up on a packed Saturday night.
NEWS
January 25, 2003
A necessary remedy The use of race-based preferences is not only appropriate but necessary in education and all other fields where racially discriminatory practices have unjustly made the playing field uneven. Whites have received preferences in education, employment, housing, the courts and in just about every facet of life for more than 300 years. How, then, does the playing field become level just because we have finally decided to end such practices? Race-based preferences, in certain specific instances can be a viable means by which to attempt to level the field.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | December 8, 1995
WASHINGTON -- The Republican vision took another snub from the Clinton administration yesterday -- on a proposal to all but end the country's 30-year-old affirmative action policies.At the first hearing on a major affirmative action bill in the Republican Congress, the Justice Department weighed in with strong protest, saying that the real message appears to be that Republican sponsors "are ready to give up on 30 years of integration."Deval L. Patrick, the Justice Department's civil rights chief, predicted that the bill ultimately would end "any affirmative action effort whatsoever."
NEWS
By Carl T. Rowan | October 28, 1997
WASHINGTON -- You get a clear picture of the sad state of race relations in America when you look at the campaign to block confirmation of Bill Lann Lee to become assistant attorney general for civil rights.Mr. Lee, the thoroughly responsible and competent western regional counsel for the NAACP Legal Defense Fund, was nominated by President Bill Clinton in July to head the Justice Department's staff of some 250 lawyers who are sworn to protect the civil rights of all Americans. Since then, conservative forces have tried to portray Lee as a dangerous extremist.
NEWS
December 6, 1991
It took several months for Governor William Donald Schaefer and Orioles owner Eli S. Jacobs to decide on a name for the new lottery-financed stadium. Oriole Park at Camden Yards may be a mouthful, but it accommodates both men's preferences -- Jacobs favored Oriole Park, while Schaefer held out for Camden Yards, a name that evokes the city's rich history as a railroad center.But when a recent sketch of a proposed sign for the home-plate entrance to the park relegated Camden Yards to second billing, with much smaller letters than Oriole Park, the governor balked.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | June 15, 2012
You know the story about William Faulkner at the Oxford, Mississippi, post office, don't you? Sacked for sitting in the back reading the magazines instead of waiting on customers, he said, "Good, now I won't be at the beck and call of every son of a bitch that's got two cents. "  Well, when The Sun sent me off on my [cough] sabbatical [cough] in 2009 and I set up the blog at a new location, I decided that I no longer had to be at the beck and call of the Associated Press Stylebook . So I gladly adopted the Oxford comma and suited my own preferences in other matters.
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