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NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,Maryland State Department of Education Pub Date: 5/20/96 SUN STAFF | May 20, 1996
FORT WASHINGTON, Md. -- Potomac Landing Elementary School is typically suburban: Children produce a closed-circuit TV show that starts the school day. A standing-room crowd sprinkled with video cameras packs the spring concert. Energetic parents run bake sales and book fairs to raise cash.It is typically suburban except for this: Only 5 percent of the students are white. About 88 percent are black, 6 percent Asian- American and 1 percent Hispanic.Potomac Landing is among the increasing number of schools where members of minority groups make up the majority of students, redefining what is typical in Maryland public schools.
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NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | December 3, 2003
The "dominant factor" in where to put single-family public housing units in Baltimore in the 1970s and 1980s was race, a Cornell University researcher told a federal judge here yesterday. Rolf Pendall, an associate professor in Cornell's Department of Regional and City Planning, said that census tracts with predominantly black populations were up to 12 times more likely to be selected as locations for individual, scattered-site housing than tracts that were mostly white. Pendall said his analysis eliminated the impact of such factors as population loss and vacancy rates.
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SPORTS
By Jerry Bembry and Jerry Bembry,SUN STAFF | October 25, 1997
A tremendous roar shook the Coppin Center, an ovation louder than that for any player introduced that night. That touched Jason Iacona.Touched him so that his nervousness during Midnight Madness was now being conquered by an uncontrollable joy, and as he walked toward the center of the court he smiled an immense smile, pumped both arms in the air and began to "raise the roof."And as he soaked in the moment last Friday, Iacona couldn't help but think about the moment's irony. That at the age of 18, after being spurned and ridiculed by his peers through four years of high school, a skinny 7-foot-1 white guy finally found acceptance and respect from students from a predominantly black school.
NEWS
By Jeffrey Gettleman and Jeffrey Gettleman,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 19, 2001
LORMAN, Miss. - From a sixth-floor office overlooking 1,700 blooming acres, Clinton Bristow Jr. shared a vision recently - one that verges on reality. Bristow, president of Alcorn State University, a predominantly black college founded 130 years ago to teach former slaves how to grow cotton, wants to transform his rural campus into a research center with state-of-the-art food science labs, health care programs and an agribusiness degree that will attract the best students anywhere, black and white.
NEWS
By Melody Simmons and Melody Simmons,Staff Writer | September 11, 1992
A Delaware company has agreed to pay $250,000 to settle charges of racial steering after its real estate agents selectively showed homes to potential black and white buyers in Randallstown, Owings Mills and Pikesville.Fine Homes, a limited partnership that once owned a Baltimore real estate company, agreed yesterday to settle a 1990 lawsuit filed by Baltimore Neighborhoods Inc., a fair-housing group.The suit alleged that Fine Homes agents steered black customers away from predominantly white neighborhoods in Baltimore County northwest of the city and that whites were steered away from predominantly black and integrated neighborhoods along the Liberty Road corridor.
NEWS
By Gregory P. Kane | April 3, 1991
THE CITY COUNCIL representatives from the 3rd and 6th districts who've been whipped into high dudgeon by Councilman Carl Stokes' redistricting plan need to be reminded of one thing: There are no black council members from the 1st, 3rd or 6th districts.In all the ruckus over redistricting, it's odd that few of the participants -- not even black council members -- mentioned this fact. To hear the injured parties from the northeast and south tell it, this is what happened the past three weeks:The city of Baltimore, a veritable paradise of racial harmony and understanding with equitably drawn councilmanic districts, was rendered asunder by black council members who rammed an unfair and racist redistricting plan down the city's gullet.
NEWS
By CARL T. ROWAN | April 8, 1991
Washington. -- A terribly high percentage of black American youngsters are getting lousy excuses for an education. Any look at the verbal and math skills, the ability to read and write, the rates of dropouts and pregnancies as early as junior high and as late as college, makes it clear that black youngsters represent a grave challenge to this nation's education leaders.What I find shocking are some of the silly ''panaceas'' being proposed: schools set up almost exclusively for black males; ''parental choice'' under which families can use government vouchers to send their children away from their bad public school, and now cries to make the curriculums at predominantly black schools and colleges ''Afrocentric.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | April 29, 2000
WASHINGTON -- The founder and financier of the nation's first major black college humor magazine wasn't here for the launch of Howard University's Illtop Journal. But comedian Chris Rock sent his regards via telegram: "I'm making a movie to pay for this all over again." After more than two years and chronic delays, the Illtop formally debuted yesterday on the Howard campus, where the quarterly magazine will be published and distributed. Molded in the satirical vein of the Harvard Lampoon, Howard's new lampoon is the brainchild of Rock, who has long decried the shortage of black writers in show business.
NEWS
By Jeffrey Gettleman and Jeffrey Gettleman,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 19, 2001
LORMAN, Miss. - From a sixth-floor office overlooking 1,700 blooming acres, Clinton Bristow Jr. shared a vision recently - one that verges on reality. Bristow, president of Alcorn State University, a predominantly black college founded 130 years ago to teach former slaves how to grow cotton, wants to transform his rural campus into a research center with state-of-the-art food science labs, health care programs and an agribusiness degree that will attract the best students anywhere, black and white.
NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | November 12, 1992
CHICAGO -- Last April, Marina Bailey and her 18-year-old daughter, Chinue, boarded a train bound for Howard University in Washington, one of several colleges to which the high school honor student had gained admission.The Baileys were so eager to visit the predominantly black university that they used money from the family's income tax refund to pay for the trip, even though it was needed for other expenses. Marina Bailey, 38, is unemployed, and her husband, Hubert, 43, is a laborer.But for the Baileys, who never attended college, having a child attend Howard was like reaching utopia.
NEWS
By Gregory Kane | January 14, 2001
LET'S ASSUME for the moment that Anthony J. Ambridge, the canned city real estate officer better known as "Tony" to those who respect and like him, is black. Let's assume that city Comptroller Joan Pratt is white. Let's assume further that the black Ambridge had worked as real estate officer for four years, had saved the city $8 million and had previously served 12 years as an effective city councilman. Finally, let's assume that a week ago Friday, the white Pratt abruptly fired the black Ambridge - and replaced him with a guy who once had to resign his elected city post to avoid prosecution - and claimed as the only reason, "It was time for a change."
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | April 29, 2000
WASHINGTON -- The founder and financier of the nation's first major black college humor magazine wasn't here for the launch of Howard University's Illtop Journal. But comedian Chris Rock sent his regards via telegram: "I'm making a movie to pay for this all over again." After more than two years and chronic delays, the Illtop formally debuted yesterday on the Howard campus, where the quarterly magazine will be published and distributed. Molded in the satirical vein of the Harvard Lampoon, Howard's new lampoon is the brainchild of Rock, who has long decried the shortage of black writers in show business.
SPORTS
By Jerry Bembry and Jerry Bembry,SUN STAFF | October 25, 1997
A tremendous roar shook the Coppin Center, an ovation louder than that for any player introduced that night. That touched Jason Iacona.Touched him so that his nervousness during Midnight Madness was now being conquered by an uncontrollable joy, and as he walked toward the center of the court he smiled an immense smile, pumped both arms in the air and began to "raise the roof."And as he soaked in the moment last Friday, Iacona couldn't help but think about the moment's irony. That at the age of 18, after being spurned and ridiculed by his peers through four years of high school, a skinny 7-foot-1 white guy finally found acceptance and respect from students from a predominantly black school.
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,Maryland State Department of Education Pub Date: 5/20/96 SUN STAFF | May 20, 1996
FORT WASHINGTON, Md. -- Potomac Landing Elementary School is typically suburban: Children produce a closed-circuit TV show that starts the school day. A standing-room crowd sprinkled with video cameras packs the spring concert. Energetic parents run bake sales and book fairs to raise cash.It is typically suburban except for this: Only 5 percent of the students are white. About 88 percent are black, 6 percent Asian- American and 1 percent Hispanic.Potomac Landing is among the increasing number of schools where members of minority groups make up the majority of students, redefining what is typical in Maryland public schools.
NEWS
October 3, 1993
To hear some critics of American immigration policy tell it, the nation has become racist, nativist and exclusionist. They say the Statute of Liberty no longer beckons. They say we are turning our back on huddled masses yearning to breathe free. In fact, America has never in all its history been more receptive to immigrants and less biased along racial or ethnic lines. Consider some figures:* There was more legal immigration to the United States in the decade of the 1980s than in any previous decade but one -- 1901-1910.
NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | November 12, 1992
CHICAGO -- Last April, Marina Bailey and her 18-year-old daughter, Chinue, boarded a train bound for Howard University in Washington, one of several colleges to which the high school honor student had gained admission.The Baileys were so eager to visit the predominantly black university that they used money from the family's income tax refund to pay for the trip, even though it was needed for other expenses. Marina Bailey, 38, is unemployed, and her husband, Hubert, 43, is a laborer.But for the Baileys, who never attended college, having a child attend Howard was like reaching utopia.
NEWS
October 3, 1993
To hear some critics of American immigration policy tell it, the nation has become racist, nativist and exclusionist. They say the Statute of Liberty no longer beckons. They say we are turning our back on huddled masses yearning to breathe free. In fact, America has never in all its history been more receptive to immigrants and less biased along racial or ethnic lines. Consider some figures:* There was more legal immigration to the United States in the decade of the 1980s than in any previous decade but one -- 1901-1910.
NEWS
By Gregory Kane | January 14, 2001
LET'S ASSUME for the moment that Anthony J. Ambridge, the canned city real estate officer better known as "Tony" to those who respect and like him, is black. Let's assume that city Comptroller Joan Pratt is white. Let's assume further that the black Ambridge had worked as real estate officer for four years, had saved the city $8 million and had previously served 12 years as an effective city councilman. Finally, let's assume that a week ago Friday, the white Pratt abruptly fired the black Ambridge - and replaced him with a guy who once had to resign his elected city post to avoid prosecution - and claimed as the only reason, "It was time for a change."
NEWS
By Melody Simmons and Melody Simmons,Staff Writer | September 11, 1992
A Delaware company has agreed to pay $250,000 to settle charges of racial steering after its real estate agents selectively showed homes to potential black and white buyers in Randallstown, Owings Mills and Pikesville.Fine Homes, a limited partnership that once owned a Baltimore real estate company, agreed yesterday to settle a 1990 lawsuit filed by Baltimore Neighborhoods Inc., a fair-housing group.The suit alleged that Fine Homes agents steered black customers away from predominantly white neighborhoods in Baltimore County northwest of the city and that whites were steered away from predominantly black and integrated neighborhoods along the Liberty Road corridor.
NEWS
By Ginger Thompson and Ginger Thompson,Staff Writer | February 17, 1992
Weighted with a heritage of moral iniquity from our past history, hard pressed in the economic world by foreign immigrants and native prejudice, hated here, despised there and pitied everywhere, our one haven of refuge is ourselves.W. E. B. DuboisLOUISVILLE, Ky. -- Only a few bridges link the worlds of the black minister from Louisville's blighted West End and the white minister from the affluent East Side -- and the traffic generally flows one way.Children from the predominantly black West End have been bused to schools in the predominantly white eastern suburbs of Jefferson County since 1975.
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