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NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | February 11, 2014
If you had asked the Europeans a week ago, they could have told you a truckload of snow was headed for Baltimore on Thursday. The Canadians came around soon afterward. It took the Americans until just a few days ago to get a whiff of a winter storm. But as quickly as weather forecasting models developed by each can converge, they can shift, pulling the rug from underneath meteorologists who had warned of a possibility of more or less snow than what might actually fall. By late Tuesday, the consensus was that six to 10 inches of snow could be expected across the region, with the heaviest precipitation falling through daybreak Thursday.
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TRAVEL
By John Bordsen and John Bordsen,CHARLOTTE OBSERVER | August 11, 2002
Who would have predicted that the personal archives and artifacts of Jeane Dixon would end up on display in Strasburg, Va., a picturesque hamlet in the Shenandoah Valley and a place she never lived? Dixon, most likely. She was the best-known psychic of the past 50 years, a regular on TV talk shows, radio programs and a headliner in the supermarket tabloids. Set aside her much-debated abilities for a moment. The fact is, Jeane Pinckert Dixon, who died in 1997 in Washington, did steer a sizable portion of her physical estate to the Wayside Foundation of American History and Arts through her friend and business associate, Leo Bernstein.
NEWS
By Mike Tidwell | February 5, 2013
Not long after President Barack Obama promised to fight climate change in his inaugural address, temperatures soared to 70 last week in Baltimore - in late January. Our weather continues to be unrecognizable. Last summer was the hottest ever recorded at Baltimore/Washington Thurgood Marshall International Airport. And across the 48 contiguous states, 2012 was the warmest on record by a huge margin. Globally, the heating trend - fueled mostly by the combustion of fossil fuels - proceeds apace.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | January 21, 2001
Predicting school enrollments is the key to one of suburbia's most vexing problems - building enough classrooms to keep parents and developers happy, without overdoing it. Instead of having public satisfaction with laws limiting development near crowded schools, Howard County is in turmoil over the issue because of consistently faulty enrollment predictions in fast-growing areas such as River Hill, Columbia's newest village. The discovery that school system predictions for enrollment at Pointers Run Elementary in River Hill in 2003 were off by more than 300 pupils triggered the county's Adequate Public Facilities Ordinance, which could force closure of the entire western county to development, starting in 2003.
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel | April 1, 2011
Jeremy Guthrie will be on the mound tonight as the Orioles look to kick off their season with a victory over the Rays. I've read plenty of guesses at the Orioles' win total in 2011, but I don't care about those. I want your predictions. I'll make mine later today (I swear). Vote in the poll on your left, and if you want to get specific, leave a comment below. Feel free to make any bold predictions down there, too, like the Orioles winning the wild card, Brian Matusz winning 20 games or Vlad Guerrero hitting 50 home runs.
NEWS
By Scott Dance | May 14, 2012
The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration earlier this month launched a more accurate weather forecast model it says improves predictions of quickly developing severe weather, and it was developed in part in Maryland.  The model is called “Rapid Refresh” and was developed at NOAA centers in Camp Springs and Boulder, Colo. Like its predecessor, it will adjust forecasts hourly based on changing conditions, but it will use a more advanced weather prediction model that has shown to more accurately pinpoint areas of severe weather.
SPORTS
December 10, 2006
This week's guest picker is longtime Baltimore sportscaster Keith Mills. Last week's guest, WJFK Radio's Anita Marks, went 8-8. Overall, the guests are 114-80. Here are this week's predictions (not against the spread): Name Last week's games Thursday's game Overall record Ravens@Chiefs Vikings@Lions Titans@Texans Patriots@Dolphins Raiders@Bengals Eagles@Redskins Falcons@Buccaneers Giants@Panthers Colts@Jaguars Packers@49ers Seahawks@Cardinals Bills@Jets Broncos@Chargers Saints@Cowboys Bears@Rams
NEWS
By Le Figaro (Paris) | July 2, 1991
The forecasters had predicted a few peaceful months for Edith Cresson [as France's first female premier]. . . .These predictions have been swept away. A month after taking office, Edith Cresson is trying to combat a succession of unwanted tempests. Certainly, the premier has spoken a little rashly, about Japan's economic practices and the sexual behavior of the English. She needs to learn that one cannot govern without holding one's tongue.The truth is undoubtedly harsh. The president (Francois Mitterrand)
NEWS
By Cynthia Tucker | February 7, 2005
ATLANTA - The plan to topple Saddam Hussein dates to the mid-1990s, when a group of neoconservatives formed a virtual government-in-exile at a think tank called the Project for a New American Century. They devised strategies, sat back and bided their time, waiting for what they called a "Pearl Harbor-type event" to provide convenient cover to invade Iraq. The plan to topple Social Security, however, is much older - dating to the 1930s, to the very formation of the program. Conservatives have always hated it and wanted to get rid of it. So, taking the long view, they devised strategies, sat back, bided their time and waited for political circumstances to provide cover to demolish Social Security.
NEWS
December 6, 2003
Last December, readers predicted that 2003 would bring, among other things, the capture of Osama bin Laden, the resignation of Vice President Dick Cheney, gas prices of more than $2 a gallon, a global ban on SUVs, approval of slots in Maryland and the biggest snowstorm the state has seen in many years. Although only the last of those predictions has proved true, we ask you now to return to your cracked crystal balls and give us your top three predictions for 2004. Will the new year be better or worse than 2003?
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