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NEWS
January 9, 2012
I am not really surprised by your position about President Obama's recess appointments ("A win for Obama - and the public," Jan. 6). However, I will be interested to see if you hold to the same point of view with a Republican president. Remember that the Democrats used the same "ruse" of pro forma sessions to keep President George W. Bush from making recess appointments. Also, how is it that any president can decide when the Senate is or is not in session? Can he now decide to make such appointments on a weekend when the senators are in their home states?
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NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2014
If the War of 1812 is the forgotten war, then the landing of the British near Dundalk is perhaps a battle few ever knew even happened. But to thousands of visitors to Fort Howard this weekend, the Battle of North Point was vivid - they felt the echoes of gunfire in their chests as they watched reenactments of a confrontation between British forces and Baltimore militia. The Dundalk-Patapsco Neck Historical Society holds the event annually, though it grew this year in commemoration of the battle's bicentennial - just days before this week's Star-Spangled Spectacular.
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NEWS
August 4, 2011
Under our Constitution, a strong president should protect and defend the nation and the presidency from dangers both foreign and domestic. The question isn't whether Washington handled the debt ceiling crisis effectively. It didn't. The important question is why a small rogue ideological group was allowed to hold the American government hostage and create a dangerous precedent that future extremists, from the left and the right, will try to exploit. The president and congressional leaders should have resisted attempts to link two totally disparate issues: a short term self-imposed debt ceiling; and a serious recession, job shortage and long term growth and fiscal problems.
SPORTS
By Jon Meoli and The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2014
Monday night's five-home-run outburst temporarily silenced concerns about the Orioles' offense, and gave the team 168 home runs on the season, 18 more than the next-closest team in the majors. But if the Orioles are to bring the first World Series title to Baltimore since 1983, they will have to buck a recent trend of the best slugging-teams in the league not making the World Series.  The Orioles are searching to become the first team since the 2009 New York Yankees to lead the league in home runs and go on to win the World Series, showing that teams with multiple ways to push runs across ultimately have a better chance to advance in the playoffs.
NEWS
August 19, 1998
THE UNITED STATES is demeaned before the world and its own eyes by the appearance of President Clinton on television to admit to what most people consider adultery and to declare, Nixon-style, that he is not a crook.The fault is his own, for doing what he should never have done; Independent Counsel Kenneth Starr's, for mounting a massive and inappropriate investigation into personal conduct violating every American's concept of the right of privacy; the press pack's and the nation's for their insatiable and gleeful prurience.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | December 4, 2001
In a case that could set a national precedent, lawyers for a Baltimore mother will ask the state's highest court today to rule that a gun maker can be held liable for the accidental death of a toddler who shot himself with a handgun that lacked a childproof lock. Lawyers for Melissa M. Halliday claim that the gun was defective and without a trigger lock, an argument that failed in two lower courts. A divided Court of Special Appeals upheld a Baltimore judge's decision to dismiss the suit.
NEWS
By Gwyneth K. Shaw and Gwyneth K. Shaw,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 14, 2005
WASHINGTON - During a long and sometimes contentious day of questioning, Supreme Court nominee John G. Roberts Jr. called the landmark 1973 abortion rights case "settled as a precedent of the court." But he stopped short yesterday of pledging to members of the Senate Judiciary Committee that the decision in Roe v. Wade should never be overturned. From the opening moments of the second day of Roberts' confirmation hearing, Roe and the right to privacy it was built on were a topic of conversation between the 50-year-old nominee for chief justice and the committee members.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 9, 2005
WASHINGTON -- Supreme Court nominee Samuel A. Alito Jr. earned fresh plaudits from senators yesterday, with two moderates - a Democrat and a Republican - expressing confidence that he did not appear eager to overturn the landmark 1973 Roe vs. Wade decision that decriminalized abortion. Sen. Susan M. Collins, a Maine Republican, said Alito told her that he would respect precedent even if he disagreed with the original ruling. "I was obviously referring to Roe in that question," Collins told reporters after meeting with Alito for about an hour.
NEWS
By NIA-MALIKA HENDERSON and NIA-MALIKA HENDERSON,SUN REPORTER | April 12, 2006
The Maryland Court of Appeals denied yesterday a request to have the murder conviction of a Waldorf man erased on the grounds that the man died while his appeal was pending. The request was made on behalf of Stefan Tyson Bell, who was convicted in August 2003 of first-degree murder in the fatal beating of a Gambrills teenager, Joseph A. Demarest, 17, who was killed in 1996. Bell, 27, died of a heroin overdose in prison in March 2005 before an appeal. Bell's lawyer, assistant public defender George E. Burns Jr., had argued that according to court precedent, Bell's conviction should be vacated because he died before a first-level appeal was completed.
NEWS
March 22, 2005
IF THERE WERE any question about the clout that accrued to social and religious conservatives as a result of their impact on last year's elections, it was put to rest by the extraordinary bipartisan pandering in the sad case of Terri Schiavo. Congressional Republicans cast aside their libertarian instincts and hostility toward big government to intervene in a family medical decision. A handful of Senate Democrats narrowed the sweep of this precedent, but were too fearful of the political backlash to block it altogether.
NEWS
By Dane Egli | July 27, 2014
The violence erupting on the former battlefields of Operation Iraqi Freedom coupled with the planned withdrawal from Afghanistan raises new concerns over the recent exchange of five Taliban commanders for U.S. Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl. The swap conflicted with traditional hostage recovery policy and trading of war prisoners and may lead our enemies to conclude that we're now willing to negotiate with kidnappers - potentially endangering lives abroad. Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, leader of the self-proclaimed Islamic State of Iraq and Syria, was himself an insurgent detainee released by the U.S. in 2009.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2014
Now that Orioles third baseman Manny Machado has apologized for Sunday's bat-throwing incident, his fate is in the hands of Major League Baseball. A decision on a suspension is expected to come down at some point on Tuesday. I'd be surprised if Machado didn't receive at least a four- or five-game suspension. It might be longer. There's been little precedent set for bat-throwing incidents, but 12 years ago, there was a similar situation involving Red Sox outfielder Trot Nixon.
NEWS
By John Fritze and The Baltimore Sun | June 2, 2014
Rep. C.A. Dutch Ruppersberger, the top-ranking Democrat on the House Intelligence Committee, said Monday that the Obama administration's decision to release five Taliban prisoners in exchange for an American prisoner of war was a "dangerous precedent" that "puts all Americans at risk throughout the world. " The Baltimore County Democrat joins a chorus of Republicans who have questioned the effort that led to the release of Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl, the last remaining prisoner in Afghanistan.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | November 22, 2013
Maryland employers cut 8,900 jobs in September and October, almost entirely before the partial federal shutdown, according to data released Friday. The U.S. Department of Labor, which released both months at once as a result of shutdown delays, said the bulk of the drop occurred in September. The agency estimated the state lost 400 jobs in October. Maryland's labor secretary, Leonard J. Howie III, blamed some of those cuts on "the ongoing uncertainty created by the sequester" - federal cuts rippling through agencies this year.
NEWS
October 4, 2013
While I agree with the notion that everyone in Congress should be out of their job come the next election, I fail to see the logic behind the theory that "both sides are to blame. " True, the supporters of the budget, mainly Democrats, are not compromising on the content. They are not expected to do so. In the legislative process, Congress passes the law, the president signs or vetoes it and the Supreme Court reviews its constitutionality. If it passes all those hurdles, it is a law. The Affordable Care Act passed all those hurdles.
NEWS
August 14, 2013
The Housing Authority of Baltimore City has finally done the right thing in paying the remaining $6.8 million it owed in lead paint liability claims. Had the agency not worked so long to avoid its legal responsibility for the damages caused by past negligence, those suffering the consequences of lead poisoning from public housing might have been helped much sooner, and the agency might now be in a much stronger position to handle its potential future liability from other claims. Nonetheless, this action at least sets a precedent that the agency will not in the future seek to ignore its legal responsibilities.
NEWS
April 21, 2003
DEER HUNTERS in Maryland may be about to breach a 300-year-old precedent. In a last-minute vote, the General Assembly gave them permission for the first time in three centuries to bag their quarry on Sundays. Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. is sure to be under pressure to veto the bill from hikers, birders, horseback riders and others who use the same woodlands on the weekends. But the measure as amended in the waning hours of the session requires of them such a small sacrifice -- only two Sundays a year, and only in the state's most rural counties -- that it represents a reasonable compromise worth the governor's approval.
NEWS
February 18, 2008
As Arizona Sen. John McCain zeroes in on the Republican nomination for president, he's trying to woo some of the doubting party faithful with the tried-and-true promise to appoint more conservative judges - in the mold of Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. and Samuel A. Alito Jr. - to the U. S. Supreme Court. That may be reassuring to some, but it isn't to others, like us, who fear that the court's slow race to undercut existing rights could become a stampede. Granted, whether one thinks the court is upholding or undermining fundamental rights and liberties is a matter of perspective, just as judicial activism and restraint are in the eyes of the beholder.
NEWS
By M. Kelly Carr | July 8, 2013
Supreme Court watchers are wearing out the word "punt" in explaining last month's decision about affirmative action in university admissions. But is it a punt back to a lower court for further consideration, or does it just look like a punt, hiding the ball for a bigger play? In Fisher v. University of Texas, the justices upheld the major precedents regarding admissions that count race as a factor - but they also told the lower court to stop treating universities with such deference and to get serious about race-neutral alternatives to achieving diversity.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | May 22, 2013
Legg Mason Inc. has lost two key employees of its Legg Mason Capital Management, including portfolio manager Mary Chris Gay. Gay, manager of an overseas version of the subsidiary's well-known Value Trust fund, and Randy Befumo, head of research at Legg Mason Capital Management, left May 15 and are "pursuing other opportunities," said spokeswoman Mary Athridge. Sam Peters, manager of the Value Trust fund in the United States, last week replaced Gay as manager of the Value Fund that is modeled after the Value Trust.
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