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By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2014
The story has been told so many times it's taken on a life of its own: Black-eyed Susans don't bloom in time for the Preakness, so the winning horse is instead draped with a blanket of yellow daisies whose centers have been painted so they look like Maryland's state flower. The New York Times and NBC are just two of the media outlets that have repeated the tale. It's in the Preakness media guide every year, including this year. Trouble is, no flowers are actually being painted - and they haven't been for maybe 15 years.
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SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2014
He's a West Coast prodigy, but California Chrome's roots reach deep into Maryland. Both the dam and one grand-dam of the Preakness favorite were foaled and raised on a 70-acre farm in Chestertown. The owners, Tom and Chris Bowman, couldn't have imagined the outcome of their breeding before California Chrome won the Kentucky Derby two weeks ago. "This is a storybook thing that we're watching right now," said Tom Bowman, 72, a horse reproduction veterinarian who owns Dance Forth Farm.
SPORTS
By Jon Meoli and The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2014
I woke up super early to try to get out to Pimlico, decided against it because it was crummy out, then fell back asleep for a little too long. So this is more like a Brunch Buddy than a Coffee Companion. But every other weekday morning, we compile the most important local sports headlines in this very space. - The Preakness post positions were set Wednesday night, with Kentucky Derby winner drew the third post and has morning line odds of 3-5. That makes him the overwhelming favorite.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2014
The deluge forecast to soak the region Friday could make for a soggy, miserable Black-Eyed Susan Day at Pimlico Race Course — though officials remain confident in a fast track for a sunny and cool Preakness Stakes on Saturday. A cold front was expected to bring storms overnight and into Friday morning, followed by a moisture-laden low pressure system, according to the National Weather Service. Heavy downpours are expected to dump 2-3 inches of rain, with higher amounts in some areas, flooding streams and small rivers, with a flash flood watch in effect through Friday afternoon.
SPORTS
By Liam Durbin | May 15, 2014
[Editor's note: Liam Durbin is owner/handicapper of e-ponies.com and creator of the One Click Pony, Pro Picks Mobile and Exacta Max apps.] RACE 1 Analysis: Relentless Ride has been making a decent living out of finishing second or third. Has only missed the board once in eight starts. The only case to be made for him breaking the curse Saturday is that the field is not particularly strong. He dropped in class last time but didn't pop. Should do so Saturday with the added distance.
NEWS
May 15, 2014
It's Preakness Week in Baltimore, which is only slightly more sober than a New Orleans Mardi Gras, more tradition-filled than the Little League World Series and definitely more diverse than the Masters Tournament. It's the city's time to shine, and no amount of clouds or rain are going to dampen the celebration. A round of black-eyed Susans, please, for the guest of honor this year who can likely be found over at Pimlico Race Course 's Stall 40 where the Kentucky Derby winner is always housed.
SPORTS
By Jon Meoli and The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2014
Ron Paolucci believes you're entitled to your opinion, but he has plenty of ways to refute the overwhelming sentiment that his 30-1 long shot filly Ria Antonia will be overmatched running with the colts in Saturday's 139th Preakness Stakes. The horse's co-owner will point to the race sheet, which says his horse is the second-highest earner of the Preakness entrants behind Kentucky Derby winner California Chrome, thanks to a November win at the Breeders' Cup Juvenile Fillies. He'll boast that he and his filly don't mind their long odds, because neither horse nor owner cares much about respect.
SPORTS
By Childs Walker and The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2014
Dynamic Impact's connections weren't sure what they had entering the April 19 Illinois Derby. The colt had flashed plenty of talent, but his performance in the afternoon never seemed to match his workouts in the morning. Facing the best competition of his life and starting from the No. 1 post, Dynamic Impact changed the narrative with a victory that surprised even his trainers. Four weeks later, he's a 12-1 fifth choice in the morning line at the Preakness. Is he simply a late bloomer?
SPORTS
By Aaron Dodson and The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2014
Mounted next to Stall 40 in the Preakness Stakes barn at Pimlico Race Course is a three-foot plaque emblazoned by black-eyed susan flowers. Each year, Stall 40 houses the Kentucky Derby winning thoroughbred, and the adjacent wooden sign commemorates the horses that ended their stay at Pimlico with a Preakness victory. If trainers were immortalized on the plague, John Servis would find his name near the bottom, next to one of the latest celebrated horses. Ten years ago, Servis trained Smarty Jones to wins in the 2004 Derby and Preakness before just falling short of claiming the Triple Crown with a second-place finish at the Belmont Stakes.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Aaron Dodson and The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2014
Bob Baffert , the Hall of Fame trainer of Preakness entry Bayern, hopes his horse has more luck in Baltimore than Bodemeister did at Pimlico two years ago. After winning the Arkansas Derby that year, Bodemeister finished second in both the Kentucky Derby and the Preakness. After Bayern won in Arkansas last month, Baffert decided to have him race in the 1-mile Derby trial rather than the 1 ¼-mile Derby. Bayern - named after soccer power Bayern Munich, the favorite club of the horse's owner Kaleem Shah - finished first in the Derby trial with Rosie Napravnik aboard, but he was later disqualified for interference and given second.
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