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Preakness Day

SPORTS
By Sports Digest | April 24, 2011
Pimlico Race Course It's a big day for Baltimore as 'Belle' wins Dahlia Stakes Baltimore Belle wore down the front-runner to win Saturday's feature at Pimlico Race Course , the $75,000 Dahlia Stakes for fillies and mares. The Dahlia had been scheduled to be run over the turf but was switched to the main track because of wet grounds. Julian Pimentel , who was atop Baltimore Belle for trainer Mike Trombetta , kept the filly racing comfortably in third through the far turn before circling wide into the lane and driving past Volare Cantare a furlong from the wire and catching Weeper in deep stretch.
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SPORTS
By Sports Digest | February 23, 2011
Horse racing All three Triple Crown races will be televised by NBC NBC will broadcast all three jewels of horse racing's prestigious Triple Crown, renewing the rights to the Preakness and reacquiring rights to the Belmont Stakes. As previously announced, NBC and Churchill Downs Inc. renewed rights to the Kentucky Derby. This marks the first time that all three races will be on one network since NBC aired them in 2005. Like NBC's agreement with Churchill Downs, the deals announced Tuesday give NBC exclusive rights to the Preakness and Belmont through 2015.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee, The Baltimore Sun | February 2, 2011
Spring brings renewal, and that was the feeling among some horsemen Wednesday, when the Maryland Jockey Club released a Pimlico spring stakes schedule that includes the return of the Grade III Allaire duPont Distaff on Preakness Day and a $100,000 boost to the purse for the day before's Grade II Black-Eyed Susan Stakes. The MJC unveiled the stakes schedule after reaching agreement with the Maryland Thoroughbred Horsemen's Association and Maryland Horse Breeders Association. All that remains is for the Maryland Racing Commission to approve it Feb. 15 at its monthly meeting at Laurel Park.
SPORTS
By FROM SUN NEWS SERVICES | February 1, 2011
Infield tickets for the 2011 Preakness are now on sale, the Maryland Jockey club announced today. The 136th annual event will take place Saturday, May 21 at Pimlico Race Course . Tickets are $40 in advance through Ticketmaster or the Preakness Ticket Sales Office, but will increase to $50 Preakness week (starting Monday, May 16). The MUG Club package is $60 in advance and $70 Preakness week. Seating information and ticket reservation are available at http://www.preakness.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | June 5, 2010
The Preakness it's not. No mobs of young people in the infield or fancily dressed women in colorful hats in the grandstand or even live horses running around Pimlico's dirt track. Still, hundreds of dedicated race fans showed up at the Northwest Baltimore track Saturday to watch and bet on simulcast broadcasts of horses running in Delaware, New Jersey and New York, as they waited for a horse with the unlikely name of Drosselmeyer to win the 142nd running of the Belmont Stakes, racing's third leg of the Triple Crown.
SPORTS
By Baltimore Sun reporter | May 26, 2010
The Preakness Day handle, which sets the pace for how successful a year Pimlico and the Maryland Jockey Club will have, was the sixth largest overall handle in 2010 but still 8.6 percent lower this year than in 2009, the jockey club announced today. The 2010 handle amounted to just over $79 million for the entire Preakness Day card and nearly $53 million for the 135th Preakness Stakes. Despite the lower figure, attendance for Preakness Day increased about 23 percent from 77,850 to 95,760.
NEWS
May 17, 2010
Based on the attendance, it looks like the Maryland Jockey Club's effort to step back from last year's attempt to make the Pimlico infield a tiny bit classier on Preakness day has been a tremendous financial success. The drop in attendance that accompanied the decision last year to ban spectators from bringing their own alcohol to the infield was overcome through good, old-fashioned crass marketing and oceans of all-you-can-drink beer. Many — including The Sun's editorial page — have decried the Jockey Club's efforts to revive the infield this year through its "Get Your Preak On" marketing campaign, which, in addition to suggestive billboards, involved the race organizers sending attractive young women out to bars in skimpy tank tops to encourage ticket sales.
SPORTS
By From Sun staff reports | May 16, 2010
Javier Castellano, the jockey who won the 2006 Preakness aboard Bernardini, and Ramon Dominguez, who rode in eight Preaknesses but has never won, each captured three races on Preakness Day. Castellano won the James W. Murphy Stakes, the seventh race of the Preakness card, aboard Beau Choix. He finished 13/4 lengths ahead of Garret Gomez, aboard Manhattan Fox. Aboard Northpoint Costas, a 4-year-old chestnut gelding who was foaled in Maryland, Castellano finished two lengths ahead of Midnite Communion in the fourth race of the day. Castellano and his mount took the lead early and never relinquished it. In his first race, aboard Primary Witness, a 4-year-old bay colt, Castellano dueled with Julien Leparoux, aboard Kurbat, down the stretch and won by half a length in a seven-horse field.
SPORTS
By Baltimore Sun staff reports | May 15, 2010
Saturday's other races: 1st race: Primary Witness survived a jockey challenge from No Mesa With Me and outlasted Kurbat in the stretch to win the mile and 1/16th Maryland Heritage Purse in the first race on the Preakness card. Jockey Luis Garcia's objection that both Primary Witness and Kurbat interfered in the upper stretch was not allowed. Javier Castellano was on Primary Witness and Julien Leparoux on Kurbat. 2nd race: In the one-mile Virtual Golf Girl Race on turf, Virsito dueled Mikoshi in midstretch, lost the lead and came back to win by a head in the final 50 yards under Ramon Dominguez.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | May 14, 2010
I've stood in the infield at Pimlico on Preakness Day and I've spent the afternoon in the clubhouse. Both have their places. Each is utterly remarkable. Reading The Baltimore Sun's accounts of the great race in years gone by reminds me that the past is often prologue. In the 1940s, when the infield was merely an oval of grass and held no boozy revelers, there were "sweltering, elbowing crowds" at the track and the betting ring became "stifling with heat, a virtual Turkish bath."
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