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By ELIZABETH LARGE | May 3, 1992
The Preakness may be Baltimore's best horse race, but for a lot of people it's also Baltimore's best excuse to party. To some that means beer and chips in the Pimlico infield. To others, though, it's Crab Louis on Belgian endive and red pepper bisque en croute at the Paolo Gucci Triple Crown Ball.We can't all attend the Maryland Jockey Club's celebration at the National Aquarium or partake of an extravagant luncheon buffet at one of the corporate tents on the big day. But the organizers and caterers involved with the high end of the Preakness festivities are willing to share their menus and some of their recipes with us. Feel free to borrow from them for your own Preakness party.
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The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2014
Tickets for the 2015 Preakness went on sale Wednesday morning, the Maryland Jockey Club announced. Renewal invoices were sent out with a deadline of Jan. 16. The 140 th running of the Preakness Stakes is set for May 16 at Pimlico Race Course. Preakness InfieldFest includes national music acts, the MUG Club and other events between the 13 horse races, headlined by the Triple Crown Preakness Stakes race. There will be tiers of pricing, based on calendar days, for Infield and MUG Club tickets.
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FEATURES
By Sloane Brown, Special to The Baltimore Sun | May 12, 2010
For many folks headed to Preakness, the focus of the afternoon isn't the race. It's the fashion — and we don't just mean hats. If you're in the grandstands, the Jockey Club area or Corporate Village, you'll want to dress the part. Betsy Dugan, owner of Bettina Collections in Cross Keys and former co-owner of Octavia in Pikesville, has been dressing women for Preakness for years. "This is the time ... to dress up," she said. If there's one rule of thumb, it's that ladies and gentlemen at Preakness should look like ...well, ladies and gentlemen.
SPORTS
Aaron Dodson and The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2014
On Monday, the Maryland Jockey Club unveiled the logo for next year's Preakness, the 140th running of the middle jewel of horse racing's Triple Crown. For the 16th straight year, the Leffler Agency designed the logo, according to a news release. "Creating the 140th Preakness logo was its usual challenge in terms of building flexibility for everything from embroidered merchandise and painting on grass to use on HD television," Leffler Agency chief executive officer Heather Connellee said in the release.
MOBILE
By Jordan Bartel | May 16, 2012
Preakness 2012 mascot Kegasus answers 10 awkward questions What you see is what you get with Kegasus, the spokeshorse-man of Preakness. He's a party guy on top, a horse who also likes to party on bottom and a Henry James scholar. So, that last part we made up, but we've always wanted to learn more about the legend. Though we were slightly afraid to get awkward with anyone who is horse-ish (the animals do seem angry and overly muscly, after all), we manned up as much as a non-crossbreed animal can to get to the bottom of Kegasus' innermost thoughts - and find out what the deal is between him and sidekick UniCarl.
SPORTS
By Baltimore Sun staff | May 10, 2011
George Bolton, who won the 2007 Preakness as co-owner of Curlin, announced today that he's bringing Astrology to the 2011 Preakness next week. It will be Astrology's third start of the year. Bolton, from Brooklandville, in Baltimore County, and Stonestreet teamed up for Curlin's thrilling victory, and Stonestreet saw success in 2009 when Rachel Alexandra became the first filly to win the Preakness in 85 years. Astrology worked a strong six furlongs over a fast Churchill Downs track on Monday in 1:12.40, according to the news release that announced his decision to run in the Preakness.  Starting the year at the $800,000 Grade III Sunland Derby at Sunland Park on March 27. Astrology finished second.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case and The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2012
The crowd as a whole is behaving surprisingly lucid and laidback, enjoying their neon yellow mugs full of beer. Anyone turned off by the debauchery of say, five years ago, might want to consider coming back. Then I spot the first public vomiting sighting of the day at 12:15 p.m. About 150 yards away from the main stage, a tall 20-something hunches over a white Maryland Jockey Club cardboard trashcan in the middle of the Infield. He has a T-shirt wrapped around his head.  He takes an extra 30 seconds by the can to collect himself.
FEATURES
May 20, 1994
Preakness events for today include:* Coca-Cola Preakness Eve Jam, Harborview Marina, 1225 Key Highway. The grand finale of the '94 Preakness Celebration features a '60s revival with the Turtles, Paul Revere and the Raiders, and Gary Puckett and the Union Gap. Local musicians perform at 5 p.m. The headliners take the stage at 7 p.m. Admission is $15. Tickets can be purchased at TicketMaster locations or by calling (410) 481-SEAT. Sponsored by WBAL-TV.For more information on Preakness Celebration events, call (410)
NEWS
By Paul McCardell | May 18, 2013
The Preakness forecast remains a tough call with varying chances of rain predicted. Weather is a major factor every year. From the May 12, 1940, edition of The Baltimore Sun: "Weather man had a tough time making up his mind. Sunshine and gayety until the first race. Everybody talking about first decent Preakness day in three years. ... Sun disappeared, cool wind blew, fancy parasols topping tables on Clubhouse lawn being took off like kites, after second race. ... Sun out again for third race.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | May 12, 2014
Take vodka, rum, whiskey, bourbon, peach schnapps, orange juice, pineapple juice, sour mix, orange-flavored liqueur, elderflower-flavored liqueur, shake, pour into a souvenir glass and garnish with an orange slice, cherry and mint sprig. Then dump it on the infield grass and get a real drink. It's the poor old black-eyed Susan, the official cocktail of the Preakness. It has been mocked, derided and dismissed as a publicity stunt. Campaigns have been waged to replace it. Its history has been mangled and misunderstood.
SPORTS
By Childs Walker and The Baltimore Sun | June 7, 2014
ELMONT, N.Y. - In the end, California Chrome could not outrun recent history. All week, veteran horsemen had pointed to the 11/2-mile oval at Belmont Park, the longest in American thoroughbred racing, and predicted it would be the grueling expanse on which his Triple Crown quest withered. They had seen it too many times, brilliantly fast horses losing their juice down the stretch of the Belmont Stakes. Surely this son of a sluggish filly and an unremarkable stallion would falter, just as Big Brown and Smarty Jones and Silver Charm had in the 36 years before him. It wasn't the result most in racing wanted, but the skeptics' logic held.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green and The Baltimore Sun | June 7, 2014
The owners of California Chrome might have had to face the world after the colt fell short of a Triple Crown victory Saturday, but Tim McCoig faced an even tougher crowd after the loss: his wife. "It's not a good day in my household. I just lost a week's paycheck," the Owings Mills resident said just moments after the Belmont Stakes favorite, who could have become the first Triple Crown winner in 36 years, finished tied for fourth. McCoig was among the group of people who gathered at Pimlico Race Course on Saturday in hopes of watching California Chrome continue his gallop into history.
NEWS
May 23, 2014
The timing of the three races in the Triple Crown needs to be tweaked to help the Preakness attract a better field ( "The greatness and failings of racing," May 20). Too often trainers skip the Preakness and prepare for the Belmont Stakes if they didn't place in the Kentucky Derby. The reason is there are only two weeks between the Derby and the Preakness but there are three weeks between the Preakness and the Belmont. The Preakness suffers as out-of-the-money Derby finishers decide to rest their horse for the third leg of the Triple Crown.
NEWS
May 22, 2014
I have loved horse racing for 60 years and have been a thoroughbred horse owner off and on since 1985. It is because I love the industry and want to see it thrive that I must write that while the owners of California Chrome felt they were treated better at Pimlico than at Churchill Downs, the management of Pimlico and Laurel race courses should take a hard look at improving service to their customers if they are to grow and frankly, survive ( ...
NEWS
May 22, 2014
This was my fifth consecutive time attending the Preakness Stakes with my husband, sister and brother-in-law. Our seats are located in the Turfside Terrace section of the racetrack. Everything, as usual, was fantastic. All of the employees from security, tellers, waiters and waitresses, bathroom attendants, and I am sure countless others who I failed to mention were great! Special thanks to our Baltimore City police officers. I even got to speak to Maryland Jockey Club President Thomas Chuckas personally that day about a parking issue we had. He listened to my problem very patiently and told me how to resolve it next year when I purchase my tickets.
SPORTS
By Alexander Pyles and The Baltimore Sun | May 20, 2014
With the short-lived nasal strip controversy resolved and wins in two Triple Crown races on his resume, California Chrome arrived in Elmont, N.Y., shortly after 11 a.m. on Tuesday, where his connections plan to run the Preakness Stakes and Kentucky Derby champion in the Belmont Stakes on June 7. Chrome, who won the 139th Preakness by 1 1/2 lengths on Saturday, will try to become the first winner of horse racing's Triple Crown since Affirmed...
SPORTS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2012
Paige Tanner of Lancaster, Pa. reveled in the infield Saturday celebrating her first Preakness -- and her last few months as a single woman. The 24-year-old, whose wedding is set for July, reunited with her girlfriends from Elizabethtown College for a bachelorette party at Pimlico.  Her bridal tiara and garter drew lots of attention from the infield crowds, Tanner said. "I've had two or three people take the garter off with their teeth," said Tanner, whose friends were all dressed in pink.
FEATURES
By Sloane Brown, Special to The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2012
Sam Grossman's fifth year as official bugler for the Preakness is one he'll never forget. Neither will his new fiancee, Valerie Moore, to whom he proposed between bugling duties for the fifth and the sixth races on Saturday. Even though the Long Island, N.Y., resident has been the bugler at his state's three racetracks — Belmont, Aqueduct and Saratoga — 250 days a year for the past 20 years, he had a big reason for popping the question the one day each year he musically introduces races at Pimlico.
SPORTS
By Trevor Hass and The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2014
Maryland Jockey Club President Tom Chuckas says he is rooting for California Chrome to win the Triple Crown - both for the health of the industry and the storyline. "Just simply having a Triple Crown keeps the industry and the public generally enthused about what's going on," Chuckas said Monday morning in a post-Preakness Stakes news conference at Pimlico Race Course . "It keeps the eyes on it, which brings attention and hopefully creates more customers, and so on. " He also called California Chrome a "feel-good story" with a team comprised of "regular people" who were agreeable and gracious during their time in Baltimore.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | May 18, 2014
The national overnight ratings for NBC's Preakness coverage were up 5 percent over last year -- the best numbers since 2010. The 6.3/15 rating and share means 6.3 percent of all TV homes were tuned to the race, with 15 percent of the sets in use at the time of the Preakness tuned to the win by California Chrome. Not surprisingly, Baltimore was the top market with a 17.2 rating and 39 share -- that was 10 percent higher than last year. But it didn't beat Louisville by much with its 16.6/33.
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