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NEWS
December 24, 2012
The main reason for so much tragedy and turmoil in the world stems from the lack of acknowledging God on a daily basis for His guidance and direction in all things. There's no greater help we have. God has been taken out of schools, and now that Christmas is approaching we want to exclude God from that. How can we? We need a God who is omnipotent and omnipresent, too. Once we put God, the creator of all things, back in the world we may have fewer problems. Let us acknowledge God's goodness and mercy and his daily presence.
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NEWS
September 21, 2014
I read with interest Roy Valiant's letter ( "Stop desecrating the anthem," Sept 18). As someone who routinely shouts, "O!" when the song is performed at Orioles games, I'd like to offer a different perspective. I won't dwell on how ironic it is that a song associated with independence has become the focus of so many "authorities" laying down the law about how it must be sung. Instead, I'd like to point out that Francis Scott Key did not write a hymn or a dirge or a prayer. He wrote and published a poem - a poem that became so popular that someone eventually set it to music.
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NEWS
August 12, 2010
As I ponder the state of our state and country I read a poem written years ago by Josiah Gilbert Holland (1819-1881) and I ask that wee extend these words to God in heaven. Make this your prayer each day until God answers. May we look at our founding fathers faith and return to it. God, give us men! A time like this demands Strong minds, great hearts, true faith and ready hands; Men whom the lust of office does not kill; Men who possess opinions and a will; Men who have honor; men who will not lie; Men who can stand before a demagogue And damm his treacherous flatteries without winking!
NEWS
By William E. Lori | August 17, 2014
Sectarian violence in Iraq has worsened dramatically in recent days, especially for Christians in the war-torn nation, prompting Pope Francis to appoint an envoy to meet with religious and government leaders in Iraq as well as with those Christians who have been forced from their homes in fear. "The news reports coming from Iraq leave us in dismay and disbelief: thousands of people, including many Christians, driven from their homes in brutal manner; children dying of thirst and hunger in their flight; women taken and carried off; violence of every kind; destruction of historical, cultural and religious patrimonies," the pope said.
NEWS
April 1, 2014
I saw the video of Carroll County Commissioner Robin B. Frazier's so-called "prayer" at her commission meeting ( "Carroll commissioner 'willing to go to jail' over right to pray," March 27). As a Christian, I am embarrassed and ashamed. It appeared that her main purpose of invoking the name of Jesus Christ was to spite the people who told her not to do so. That's not why or how I was taught to pray, and I hardly expect the Almighty to have heard her "in-your-face, try and stop me" speech as much of a prayer either.
NEWS
May 19, 2014
In response to the letter, "Keep church and state separate" (May 16), prayer was an everyday occurrence when I was growing up and attending public school in the 1950s and early 1960s. A student read a passage from the Bible, then the Lord's Prayer was recited ending the morning ritual with the Pledge of Allegiance to follow. Nobody I know was adversely affected by this practice. Whether it took place in elementary, junior high or high school, no child was scarred negatively. At the Baltimore Polytechnic Institute, children from many religious backgrounds attended with no negative reaction to the morning prayer.
NEWS
March 31, 2014
The Sun correctly criticized the Carroll County Board of Commissioners for defying a federal court order by opening a recent meeting with a sectarian prayer ( "A difficult balance," March 27). But one point was faulty: The editorial expressed concern that the commissioners' freedom of speech was threatened by restrictions on government prayer. Such concern is misplaced because the court made it clear that the start of a government meeting is not an open forum for free speech.
NEWS
April 2, 2014
It's an interesting coincidence that two articles having to do with the First Amendment's freedom of religion clause recently appeared in The Sun. The simpler one was about a lady complaining her freedom of religion was being violated by county officials offering prayers before their meetings ("As Carroll debates prayer, founding fathers' faith comes into focus," March 29). The somewhat more complicated article was about a physicist's finding of a particle smaller than the smallest one known to exist since the 1960s ( "Documentary follows 'Particle Fever' surrounding Higgs boson discovery," March 19)
NEWS
May 17, 2012
Pastors are charged with the heavy responsibility of leading His people to experience God's saving grace. We must fervently defend God's word with strength and humility. Our burden is light because we are powerless. All the power in this world derives from God's love. I am moved to pray to truly know God's law. In Leviticus 20:22 God teaches us to obey his law. Every pastor has read the Bible's 12 passages with terms commonly identified with homosexuality. I pray we learn to love to learn the contextual truths of the Bible.
NEWS
Letter to The Aegis | April 29, 2014
I am shocked to have seen Roger Kegley's letter to The Aegis telling people how to pray. Freedom of religion is one of our nation's basic rights (although under continual attack). Generations of our service men and women gave their lives to protect these rights. A prayer is a communication from an individual to the God that they believe in. Some of our Arabic countries have a loud call to prayer twice a day and the people of that belief stop whatever they are doing regardless of where they are and take time to pray out loud.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2014
The group battling with Carroll County commissioners over Christian prayers at their meetings asked a judge Tuesday to order a "permanent injunction" on the practice, which they say alienates some community members. "Public officials are not in the business of offering Christian prayers," said Roy Speckhardt, executive director of the American Humanist Association, a plaintiff in the case. He called the invocations "unconstitutional. " With the latest filing by the plaintiffs for a summary judgment, both sides are now asking the judge to make a final ruling on the case rather than holding a trial.
NEWS
June 4, 2014
Sadly, commentator Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. repeats the babble of religious conservatives who claim that the "free exercise" of religion includes the right to impose their own religion on everyone else at government meetings or other government-sponsored institutions, including public school classrooms ( "Freedom of, not from, religion," June 1). The repetition of religious formulas of prayer or even extemporaneous forms of prayer as part of a public event is an imposition of religion at that event.
NEWS
June 4, 2014
In his zeal to make the case supporting the propriety of public prayer, former Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. bases his argument on two falsehoods ( "Freedom of, not from, religion," June 1). First, he says "the framers never used the phrase 'separation of church and state' - except that Thomas Jefferson coined that phrase, approvingly, in his letter to the Danbury Baptist Church. James Madison used the same language in his letter to Robert Walsh. Since these men are, respectively, the authors of the Declaration of Independence and the Bill of Rights, I believe they do qualify as the "framers.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2014
Plaintiffs in a federal lawsuit challenging Christian prayers at Carroll County commissioner meetings have dropped a request for a temporary ban on the practice. The plaintiffs, a humanist group and residents who say they feel alienated by the prayers, said that instead they intend to ask the judge to make a final judgment in the case. The commissioners have already filed papers making the same request. U.S. District Court Judge William D. Quarles previously banned the commissioners from praying to Jesus at the beginning of their meetings, saying it was likely the plaintiffs would win the case.
NEWS
May 22, 2014
I take issue with letter writer Richard Goutos' statement that no one was injured by listening to prayers at Baltimore Polytechnic Institute and other schools ( "Return prayer to public schools," May 19). I was one of those students who was made to feel inferior while I had to stand and in silence at the Christmas Nativity display and the introductory prayers of another's religion. Perhaps he forgets who is harmed when Syrian Christians, Sunnis and Shia kill each other because they do not want to listen to each others prayers.
NEWS
May 19, 2014
In response to the letter, "Keep church and state separate" (May 16), prayer was an everyday occurrence when I was growing up and attending public school in the 1950s and early 1960s. A student read a passage from the Bible, then the Lord's Prayer was recited ending the morning ritual with the Pledge of Allegiance to follow. Nobody I know was adversely affected by this practice. Whether it took place in elementary, junior high or high school, no child was scarred negatively. At the Baltimore Polytechnic Institute, children from many religious backgrounds attended with no negative reaction to the morning prayer.
NEWS
May 7, 2014
I applaud your editorial, "The local religion" (May 6). The Supreme Court's decision to allow sectarian prayers at local meetings is wrong, and the argument that the inclusion of prayers rests on "long-standing American tradition" is specious. Perhaps the members of the Supreme Court and all Americans need to reacquaint themselves with the Treaty of Tripoli written by John Adams and ratified unanimously by Congress in 1797. This document states categorically that "the Government of the United States of America is not, in any sense, founded on the Christian religion.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2014
Carroll County Commissioner Robin B. Frazier will not face punishment for contempt of court after she uttered a prayer to Jesus at a recent meeting, a federal judge ruled Thursday. In March, U.S. District Judge William D. Quarles Jr. issued a temporary ban on any prayers that mentioned Jesus or any other specifically Christian figures. After Frazier's prayer and another offered by a resident during a public comment period, the plaintiffs in the case - people who say the invocations alienate them - filed contempt charges.
NEWS
May 15, 2014
I feel sorry for anyone who has to alienate others by overtly Christianizing prayer before Carroll Board of County Commissioners meetings ( "Carroll commissioners resume opening with Christian prayer ," May 14). Are these people so fearful or dependent that they have to speak the name of Jesus before feeling strong enough to do the work of the board? What's wrong with using "God" or "Master of the Universe" or similar invocations which might create a feeling of bonding and cooperation instead of divisiveness and discomfort?
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