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NEWS
March 19, 1992
For decades, Soviet citizens used to joke about their country's main newspaper that there was no truth in Pravda ("The Truth").According to the Leninist relativity theory they were right. Vladimir I. Lenin, the founder of the Soviet state, used to argue that constant truth did not exist; it changed according to circumstances. By naming the party's newspaper Pravda, Russian speakers immediately knew that its truth, too, was changeable. For there is another Russian word, istina, that signifies eternal truth.
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NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,Sun Foreign Reporter | September 28, 2006
MOSCOW -- Russian President Vladimir V. Putin is not typically a flashy guy. He tends to dress in conservative colors, is spare with emotion and, despite his compact frame, gives off a tough-guy look. From him, it can be said, one knows what to expect. Which is why it was unusual, a touch unsettling even, to see the former KGB officer striking a jaunty pose in the pages of one of the nation's most popular newspapers, the tabloid Komsomolskaya Pravda, one recent morning. There he was, the normally staid and stoic head of state, bereft of his conventional dark suit and predictable tie, exercising a bit of fashion freedom by sporting more casual garb - in daring colors, no less.
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NEWS
August 6, 1996
DURING THE SEVEN decades of Soviet existence, Pravda, despite its circulation in the millions, never was the country's biggest newspaper. But as the official organ of the Communist ** Party, it was by far the most important. Dozens of satellite plants printed and delivered it, making sure party apparatchiks in 15 republics knew what the day's truth was, according to the Kremlin.This once-mighty paper has now suspended publication for the fifth time since the collapse of the Soviet Union. Its owners, two millionaire brothers from Greece, accuse the paper's editors and staff of working little, of boozing too much and publishing "nothing worth reading."
SPORTS
September 14, 2003
With opinion, Preston simply doing his job It seems like every week somebody wants to bash Sun sports columnist Mike Preston for doing his job. Most recently, one letter writer questioned his qualifications to write about Brian Billick's coaching judgment, because that writer was questioning Mike's qualifications to offer an opinion on this topic ["Preston is way off base in bashing of Billick," Sept. 7]. My understanding of Mr. Preston's job is that he is supposed to offer informed opinion.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | August 9, 1991
MOSCOW -- After more than 70 years of resistance, Pravda, the giant and very official Communist Party publishing house, has decided to give the masses their opiate. It plans to print the Bible."Business," explained Mikhail M. Troschin, Pravda's deput director, "is business."Right now, business is bad. Pravda, the big party newspaper, dropped in circulation last year -- down to 5 million from 10 million. Magazines such as Party Life and Political Self-Education have stumbled.And with the cost of paper rising daily, Pravda knew it needed best-seller.
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Evening Sun Staff | September 27, 1991
For decades, they helped shape the attitudes of the Soviet people toward Americans as journalists for the two most powerful news organizations in that nation.Their task: to write about all that was not good about the United States.Now Vitaly Gans, Washington bureau chief of Pravda, and Vladimir Mataysh, Washington bureau chief of the Soviet Union's official Tass News Agency, say they are painting a more accurate portrayal of American life as a result of perestroika and this summer's failed coup.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | March 31, 1994
MOSCOW -- The lively newspaper Komsomolskaya Pravda scooped its competitors yesterday with a report about the impending removal of one of the brilliant red communist stars atop the Kremlin and its replacement with an imperial double-headed eagle.The scoop wasn't in the news angle so much -- after all, anyone can make up a story -- but in the timing.According to the front-page article, bylined "Mark Ruffov," all the streets around the Kremlin were to be closed today so the public couldn't see what was going on. This, after all, was dicey: an extremely nervous government stripping the very citadel of Soviet power, the last turning off of a red light whose gleam once lighted the cosmos itself and still pierces the dark Moscow night.
NEWS
By GEORGE F. WILL | August 8, 1991
Washington -- President Bush, on the verge of tears, his voice cracking, spoke of ''shadows of past evil'' at Babi Yar, the ravine near Kiev where in 1941 Nazi gunfire murdered 33,000 Jews in 36 hours.Does he know that 30 years later the Soviet government compounded the atrocity? It is a story that illustrates the mountain of mendacity through which the slender sprouts of Soviet reform must push.In 1971, Soviet support for the Arab campaign to delegitimize Israel included a Pravda story that ''Zionist agents active during the last war in Western and Eastern Europe and in the occupied part of the Soviet Union collaborated with the Nazis'' and this collaboration included the Babi Yar massacre.
NEWS
By Celestine Bohlen and Celestine Bohlen,New York Times News Service | August 24, 1991
MOSCOW -- The Communist Party, for decades the bulwark of the Soviet state, was put to a humiliating rout yesterday, as party bosses and organizations across the country either defected or were locked out of their offices in mass retribution for the party's complicity in the coup attempt this week.On the streets, people said over and over again that now was the time to break the party's back, in case it managed later to regroup and assert control again.Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin ordered a halt to the publication of Pravda and other party newspapers, sealed the headquarters of the Central Committee and suspended the activities of the Russian republic's party branch while an investigation takes place into party support for the coup.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,Sun Foreign Reporter | September 28, 2006
MOSCOW -- Russian President Vladimir V. Putin is not typically a flashy guy. He tends to dress in conservative colors, is spare with emotion and, despite his compact frame, gives off a tough-guy look. From him, it can be said, one knows what to expect. Which is why it was unusual, a touch unsettling even, to see the former KGB officer striking a jaunty pose in the pages of one of the nation's most popular newspapers, the tabloid Komsomolskaya Pravda, one recent morning. There he was, the normally staid and stoic head of state, bereft of his conventional dark suit and predictable tie, exercising a bit of fashion freedom by sporting more casual garb - in daring colors, no less.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | January 30, 2001
MOSCOW - In 1993, Mikhail S. Gorbachev helped a small group of reporters and editors establish a newspaper by giving them money from his 1990 Nobel Peace Prize for the purchase of newsroom computers. The journalists called their paper Novaya Gazeta - New Newspaper. And seven years later, their paper is as fresh as ever, though the only peace they find is with their consciences. Last summer, Igor Domnikov, a 42-year-old reporter and special-projects editor for the paper, was killed. His colleagues speculate that he was mistaken for Oleg Sultanov, a Novaya Gazeta investigative reporter who lived in the same building and who had been repeatedly harassed and threatened because of his crusading journalism.
NEWS
August 6, 1996
DURING THE SEVEN decades of Soviet existence, Pravda, despite its circulation in the millions, never was the country's biggest newspaper. But as the official organ of the Communist ** Party, it was by far the most important. Dozens of satellite plants printed and delivered it, making sure party apparatchiks in 15 republics knew what the day's truth was, according to the Kremlin.This once-mighty paper has now suspended publication for the fifth time since the collapse of the Soviet Union. Its owners, two millionaire brothers from Greece, accuse the paper's editors and staff of working little, of boozing too much and publishing "nothing worth reading."
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | March 31, 1994
MOSCOW -- The lively newspaper Komsomolskaya Pravda scooped its competitors yesterday with a report about the impending removal of one of the brilliant red communist stars atop the Kremlin and its replacement with an imperial double-headed eagle.The scoop wasn't in the news angle so much -- after all, anyone can make up a story -- but in the timing.According to the front-page article, bylined "Mark Ruffov," all the streets around the Kremlin were to be closed today so the public couldn't see what was going on. This, after all, was dicey: an extremely nervous government stripping the very citadel of Soviet power, the last turning off of a red light whose gleam once lighted the cosmos itself and still pierces the dark Moscow night.
NEWS
March 19, 1992
For decades, Soviet citizens used to joke about their country's main newspaper that there was no truth in Pravda ("The Truth").According to the Leninist relativity theory they were right. Vladimir I. Lenin, the founder of the Soviet state, used to argue that constant truth did not exist; it changed according to circumstances. By naming the party's newspaper Pravda, Russian speakers immediately knew that its truth, too, was changeable. For there is another Russian word, istina, that signifies eternal truth.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,Moscow Bureau | February 19, 1992
MOSCOW -- The years of strict government supervision have ended, and now the press is discovering that freedom carries a high price.Just as many of them are beginning to develop robust, independent voices, newspapers across the former Soviet Union are being suffocated by rising costs and falling revenues.One of Moscow's most popular daily papers says newspaper finances are so seriously threatened that the new Commonwealth of Independent States faces an "information crisis" that endangers the economic and political reforms now under way."
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Evening Sun Staff | September 27, 1991
For decades, they helped shape the attitudes of the Soviet people toward Americans as journalists for the two most powerful news organizations in that nation.Their task: to write about all that was not good about the United States.Now Vitaly Gans, Washington bureau chief of Pravda, and Vladimir Mataysh, Washington bureau chief of the Soviet Union's official Tass News Agency, say they are painting a more accurate portrayal of American life as a result of perestroika and this summer's failed coup.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,Moscow Bureau | February 19, 1992
MOSCOW -- The years of strict government supervision have ended, and now the press is discovering that freedom carries a high price.Just as many of them are beginning to develop robust, independent voices, newspapers across the former Soviet Union are being suffocated by rising costs and falling revenues.One of Moscow's most popular daily papers says newspaper finances are so seriously threatened that the new Commonwealth of Independent States faces an "information crisis" that endangers the economic and political reforms now under way."
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | October 11, 1990
MOSCOW -- The KGB, traditionally distinguished by monolithic loyalty to the Soviet leadership, is showing increasing signs of splitting into pro-reform and anti-reform factions under pressure from media scrutiny and a multiparty system.A small but growing number of current and former officers of the powerful intelligence and security agency are going public with criticism of its operations, while the KGB brass continues to insist that no internal reform is needed."Unquestionably, there has appeared a division within the KGB," said Alexander A. Milchakov, a Moscow journalist who has regular contact with KGB employees in his research on mass graves of victims of Stalin-era executions.
NEWS
By Celestine Bohlen and Celestine Bohlen,New York Times News Service | August 24, 1991
MOSCOW -- The Communist Party, for decades the bulwark of the Soviet state, was put to a humiliating rout yesterday, as party bosses and organizations across the country either defected or were locked out of their offices in mass retribution for the party's complicity in the coup attempt this week.On the streets, people said over and over again that now was the time to break the party's back, in case it managed later to regroup and assert control again.Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin ordered a halt to the publication of Pravda and other party newspapers, sealed the headquarters of the Central Committee and suspended the activities of the Russian republic's party branch while an investigation takes place into party support for the coup.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | August 9, 1991
MOSCOW -- After more than 70 years of resistance, Pravda, the giant and very official Communist Party publishing house, has decided to give the masses their opiate. It plans to print the Bible."Business," explained Mikhail M. Troschin, Pravda's deput director, "is business."Right now, business is bad. Pravda, the big party newspaper, dropped in circulation last year -- down to 5 million from 10 million. Magazines such as Party Life and Political Self-Education have stumbled.And with the cost of paper rising daily, Pravda knew it needed best-seller.
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