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By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | October 17, 2013
The Baltimore City Department of Public Works said on Thursday morning that traffic along Pratt Street is still hampered by a Wednesday water main break at Market Place. DPW spokesman Kurt Kocher said that crews are on the scene repairing a 10-inch break that runs seven feet deep and beneath a storm drain. As of 10:50 a.m., Kocher said, two northbound lanes on Pratt Street are closed and Market Place is closed between Lombard and Pratt Street. Kocher said DPW is determining how to proceed with repairs and added a completion time had yet to be determined.
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BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2014
The Downtown Partnership of Baltimore is looking for money to fund the replacement of the deteriorating McKeldin Plaza fountain with trees and a grassy park by 2016. Downtown Partnership President Kirby Fowler said there is consensus among the city and other downtown stakeholders on designs, which show a trapezoid of green where the 1981 multi-level fountain currently stands.  The estimated cost of demolition and creation of the park, which would include trees and a “basic water feature” is about $3.5 million, he said.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | October 30, 2011
John Houser III reviews Patrick's of Pratt Street, which claims to be the United States oldest Irishpub still in existence. Patrick's of Pratt Street was founded was established by the great great-uncle of its current owners in 1847 and has been in its current location since 1862. It has been in more or less continuous use as a public bar or tavern since. However, it has not always been called Patrick's of Pratt Street and for much of the time was not an Irish bar. Still. When I checked into this claim eight years ago, I could find no Irish bar in America with a convincing claim otherwise.  McSorley's in New York, in case you were wondering, was established in 1852.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | May 29, 2014
Real estate experts offered a gloomy view of the market for some of the office space in the core of downtown, telling the Baltimore Development Corp. Thursday it is becoming harder for owners of offices along the Baltimore and Charles Street corridors to find tenants. Overall vacancy rates are at about 17.8 percent, down from the 2010 peak of 20.8 percent, according to Jones Lang LaSalle, which presented to the BDC at its monthly meeting. Along the Pratt Street corridor, where many of the premium properties are located, vacancy hit a five-year low of 14.9, according to the presentation.
NEWS
April 14, 2013
The Baltimore City Department of Transportation says it will implement temporary lane closures along a portion of Pratt Street for construction work beginning on Monday morning. Officials say two lanes of Pratt Street will be closed to through traffic at the intersection of Eutaw Street from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Then at 3 p.m., a single lane of through traffic will remain closed along Pratt Street throughout the night. The closures will be performed weather permitting. Adrienne Barnes, a public affairs specialist for the department, said the closures will allow crews to patch the roadway where utility work has been performed.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2010
A parade. At night. With a horse theme. The folks at Nana Projects are so ready for tonight's Preakness Parade of Lights. They've got their stilt walkers, along with their glowing lanterns, their pony puppets, their pony hats, all backed by a local Dixieland jazz band, Sac Au Lait. The Inner Harbor, they promise, is going to swing. "We love big parades," says Molly Ross, director and principal artist for the Roland Park-based artists' collective that's the guiding force behind Highlandtown's annual Halloween Lantern Parade.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | September 10, 2013
The city plans to remove a skywalk between the Baltimore Convention Center and Bank of America at 100 S. Charles St. in the next few weeks, according to the Downtown Partnership of Baltimore, a nonprofit. The goal is to increase pedestrian traffic for retail establishments, said Kirby Fowler, president of the nonprofit. Another skywalk was recently removed at Gay and Pratt streets to boost foot traffic, he said. City planners believe putting foot traffic at ground level is an unnecessary barrier to retail stores.
NEWS
October 6, 2013
Officials at the Baltimore City Department of Transportation say a portion of Pratt Street will close nightly this week for the demolition of a pedestrian bridge. Beginning on Monday evening, Pratt will be closed to through traffic between Howard and Charles streets from 10 p.m. to 5 a.m. through Thursday, Oct. 10, weather permitting. Officials said detour signs will be posted, and will guide drivers onto Baltimore Street as an alternate route. Motorists should expect delays and are encouraged to use alternate routes.
NEWS
September 27, 2008
I just cannot believe, considering what is going on with the national economy, that any representative of Baltimore could even suggest a $100 million renewal plan for Pratt Street ("Pratt St. plan gets mixed reviews," Sept. 15). There is no way that you can convince me that the plan, as I understand it, would benefit city residents. And I certainly would like to see this money go into our striving city neighborhoods instead. The Baltimore Sun has reported that city commercial properties are becoming vacant and newly built ones are having difficulty getting filled ("Next crunch?"
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | October 23, 2004
Downtown traffic was snarled yesterday by a 12-foot-long sinkhole that threatens to create headaches for those traveling to tomorrow's Ravens game at M&T Bank Stadium. The sinkhole, north of Oriole Park at Camden Yards, appeared at the edge of Pratt Street near Eutaw Street shortly before noon. No one was hurt, according to Public Works spokesman Bob Murrow. The sinkhole is more of a buckling of pavement than a chasm, Murrow said. However, because workers can't see down into the narrow space, crews will have to dig to determine the cause.
NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2014
Baltimore fire officials have pulled a man's body from the waters of the Inner Harbor in the 600 block of E. Pratt Street. Police officers responded to reports of a body floating in the water Friday at 6:55 p.m. There were no obvious signs of trauma to the body. The Medical Examiners Office will conduct an autopsy to determine the cause of death. andrea.walker@baltsun.com Twitter.com/ankwalker
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | March 22, 2014
Sondra Harrison McGee, who co-owned and managed her family's Pier Five seafood restaurant on Pratt Street, died of a heart attack March 17 at her Marco Island, Fla., home. She was 71 and had lived in the Hampton section of Towson. Born on Tilghman Island, she was the daughter of Levin F. Harrison Jr. and Alice Garvin Harrison, who owned and operated Harrison's Chesapeake House. Her father was a charter fishing boat operator and her mother ran the popular Eastern Shore summer hotel and restaurant.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | January 9, 2014
The Capital Grille has come to feel like a hometown restaurant. Of course, it's not. When the Capital Grille opened on Pratt Street in 2005, is was part of a moderate-size regional chain. But since 2010, the steakhouse been wholly owned by the gigantic Orlando, Fla.-based Darden Restaurants, which also owns Red Lobster and Olive Garden. Still, Baltimore's business community has made the Capital Grille into its executive dining room. And on a Saturday night, you'll see a few tourists scattered about the handsome dining rooms, but mostly you'll see your friends and neighbors.
NEWS
December 14, 2013
Rumors of downtown Baltimore's demise, it seems, have been greatly exaggerated. The decision this week by money manager and downtown anchor T. Rowe Price to stay in its Pratt Street headquarters through at least 2027 should alleviate fears that the city's traditional central business district will empty out in favor of fancier and newer quarters in Harbor East. T. Rowe executives heard the siren song of developer Michael Beatty's presentation about the mini-city he plans to build at Harbor Point, and decided to stay, no lashing to the mast required.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman | November 21, 2013
The parking lot across from Harborplace, once called the "last piece of the Pratt Street puzzle," sold this summer for $16.4 million. The brokerage representing seller UrbanAmerica Advisors LLC announced the sale to Chicago-based parking garage operator and developer Interpark Holdings in August without disclosing the sum. The sale of the property, located at 300 East Pratt Street and identified in state and city records as 301 East Lombard...
SPORTS
The Baltimore Sun | November 8, 2013
Sunday's game between the Ravens and the Cincinnati Bengals at M&T Bank Stadium is the first since road and lane closures began near the stadium. Access to and from the stadium has been affected. Here are the streets affected: * A block of Warner Street, located directly south of the stadium, has been permanently closed due to the new casino being built in the area. The closure extends between Worcester and Bayard streets. Fans heading north on Russell Street, who would normally turn right on either of these streets, can now turn right on Worcester Street, which connects to Warner Street.
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Sun architecture critic | June 25, 2007
Will Baltimore's Pratt Street ever be the equivalent of Chicago's Michigan Avenue or New York's Fifth Avenue, or perhaps even the Avenue des Champs-Elysees in Paris? Or are they the wrong images to hold out? Those questions came up during a recent presentation by architects from Ayers Saint Gross and others hired this year to come up with ideas for strengthening 16 blocks of Pratt Street as a destination for tourists and residents. Adam Gross, one of the principals of Baltimore-based Ayers Saint Gross, suggested that city planners look at grand avenues in Chicago, New York, Paris and elsewhere as a way to determine what is possible downtown and what Baltimoreans might strive for. His firm often prepares drawings and image boards that compare places it is studying with places that are considered highly successful, and those are what he showed members of Baltimore's Urban Design and Architectural Review Panel.
NEWS
By JEAN MARBELLA and JEAN MARBELLA,jean.marbella@baltsun.com | September 11, 2008
Pity poor Pratt Street. It is a big street but little loved, one that manages to be pedestrian, as in undistinguished, and yet not pedestrian-friendly, as in eminently stroll-able. No lyricists have been moved to immortalize it, as they have "State Street, that great street," or "the avenue, Fifth Avenue." So I had one question yesterday when the city unveiled a huge, $100 million redevelopment plan to freshen up and enliven the street: Is $100 million enough? No, seriously, Pratt in its current incarnation isn't all that bad. It's just neutral - the equivalent of flyover country.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | October 17, 2013
The Baltimore City Department of Public Works said on Thursday morning that traffic along Pratt Street is still hampered by a Wednesday water main break at Market Place. DPW spokesman Kurt Kocher said that crews are on the scene repairing a 10-inch break that runs seven feet deep and beneath a storm drain. As of 10:50 a.m., Kocher said, two northbound lanes on Pratt Street are closed and Market Place is closed between Lombard and Pratt Street. Kocher said DPW is determining how to proceed with repairs and added a completion time had yet to be determined.
NEWS
October 6, 2013
Officials at the Baltimore City Department of Transportation say a portion of Pratt Street will close nightly this week for the demolition of a pedestrian bridge. Beginning on Monday evening, Pratt will be closed to through traffic between Howard and Charles streets from 10 p.m. to 5 a.m. through Thursday, Oct. 10, weather permitting. Officials said detour signs will be posted, and will guide drivers onto Baltimore Street as an alternate route. Motorists should expect delays and are encouraged to use alternate routes.
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