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By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | May 12, 2005
To reach the point that it could open a sparkling new hospital building in a ceremony today, Sheppard Pratt Health System had to spend the past two decades shifting its focus away from hospitalization and its Towson campus. Mental health care has moved relentlessly from inpatient to outpatient, from long-term to short-term, from talk therapies to medications, from private payments to government programs. Along the way, Sheppard Pratt has had to reinvent itself. "What they did was forward-thinking and proactive," said Mark Covall, executive director of the National Association of Psychiatric Health Systems, an association for psychiatric hospitals and units.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 19, 2013
Anita L. Madsen, a former News American reporter who later became director of public affairs for the Sheppard Pratt Health System, died July 13 of lung cancer at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. She was 69. Born Anita Lewis and raised in Chicago, she worked from 1973 to 1983 with the Johns Hopkins University Krieger School of Arts and Sciences, including five years with the Johns Hopkins University Press. While earning a bachelor's degree in mass communications and classical studies in 1983, Ms. Madsen worked the last six months of her senior year as a full-time intern at the old News American.
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NEWS
November 30, 1996
An article in Thursday's Business section on the merger of the chemical dependency programs at Greater Baltimore Medical Center and Sheppard Pratt Health System incorrectly stated how much money the programs were losing. Between them, the programs were losing more than $250,000 a year.The Sun regrets the error.Pub Date: 11/30/96
NEWS
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 27, 2008
With all the news about the economic crisis, is it any wonder that some of us feel stressed out about our financial futures? Although experiencing some stress may be a reasonable reaction to the global financial situation, feeling deeply anxious during tough economic times doesn't have to be inevitable, says Jack Vaeth, staff psychiatrist at Sheppard Pratt Health System, who also is in private practice in Hunt Valley and Annapolis. Given the reports about the economy these days, is feeling more anxious than usual about our financial futures unavoidable?
NEWS
By Kris Antonelli and Kris Antonelli,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Suzanne Loudermilk contributed to this article | May 8, 1997
Lawyers for Sheppard and Enoch Pratt Hospital and the family of Sharon Edwards -- the woman slain while working as a counselor at the hospital in 1995 -- have settled a $10 million negligence lawsuit against the Towson psychiatric institution in a confidential agreement."
NEWS
By Elaine Tassy and Elaine Tassy,SUN STAFF | December 28, 1995
The family of Sharon Edwards -- the woman slain while working as a counselor at Sheppard and Enoch Pratt Hospital in October -- filed a $10 million negligence lawsuit against the hospital yesterday.The suit claims that Sheppard Pratt Health System Inc. did not provide Ms. Edwards, a 26-year-old single mother, with security or training on her first night working at a residential cottage on the grounds. The suit also claims that the Towson psychiatric hospital failed to isolate Benjamin Garris, 16, who has been charged with murder in the Oct. 8 stabbing.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | March 26, 2000
They offered him scuffed album covers, featuring his face from 30 years ago. And Gordon Lightfoot accepted the tributes graciously -- autographing the prized cardboard squares before handing them back to fans at a post-concert reception at Goucher College's Kraushaar Auditorium. This was an evening full of treats -- the show, the chance to meet the folk rocker, and a yummy dessert buffet featuring such goodies as bananas Foster, cream puffs and chocolate torte -- with the proceeds going to Sheppard Pratt Health System programs for children and adolescents with mental illness.
NEWS
February 27, 2003
On February 26, 2003, BARBARAFETCHKO COOPER, age 39, of Baltimore, formerly of Willards, MD; wife of the late Edward J. Cooper; loving daughter of Joseph and Orna-Maie Fetchko; devoted sister of Catherine Hower, Susan Pearson and Joan MacDonald. She is also survived by seven nieces and nephews. Funeral Services will be on Saturday, at 10 A.M., at the Hasting Funeral Home, 19 South Main Street, Selbyville, DE, where friends may call on Friday evening, from 6 to 8 P.M. Interment will be in New Hope Cemetery, Willards, MD. In lieu of flowers, the family suggest contributions to The Memorial Contribution Fund, Sheppard Pratt Health System, P.O. Box 6815, Baltimore, MD 21285.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | May 10, 2005
The old-world stone gatehouse still marks the entrance to Sheppard Pratt, just as it has since the psychiatric hospital opened in 1891. But beyond the North Charles Street landmark and the trees that shield much of the hospital grounds from public view, the facility has a vastly different look. Now the Towson hospital is ready to show off its $90 million upgrade. The wards in the 19th-century Victorian buildings are being renovated for use by treatment programs and for offices. That's because most of the patients will now stay in private rooms in a new four-story building that includes an admitting wing and something else the old place didn't -- a lobby.
BUSINESS
February 20, 1997
The Sheppard Pratt Health System announced yesterday that it has launched a free phone consultation service for physicians, called Consult-Line.Physicians with questions about patients with behavioral or substance-abuse problems can get a return call from the Sheppard Pratt staff psychiatrist.Mark R. Eber, a Sheppard Pratt spokesman, said the calls would be fielded by the same counselors who answer calls from the public for Sheppard's therapy-referral service. The counselor would then locate a staff psychiatrist to consult with the doctor.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | May 12, 2005
To reach the point that it could open a sparkling new hospital building in a ceremony today, Sheppard Pratt Health System had to spend the past two decades shifting its focus away from hospitalization and its Towson campus. Mental health care has moved relentlessly from inpatient to outpatient, from long-term to short-term, from talk therapies to medications, from private payments to government programs. Along the way, Sheppard Pratt has had to reinvent itself. "What they did was forward-thinking and proactive," said Mark Covall, executive director of the National Association of Psychiatric Health Systems, an association for psychiatric hospitals and units.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | May 10, 2005
The old-world stone gatehouse still marks the entrance to Sheppard Pratt, just as it has since the psychiatric hospital opened in 1891. But beyond the North Charles Street landmark and the trees that shield much of the hospital grounds from public view, the facility has a vastly different look. Now the Towson hospital is ready to show off its $90 million upgrade. The wards in the 19th-century Victorian buildings are being renovated for use by treatment programs and for offices. That's because most of the patients will now stay in private rooms in a new four-story building that includes an admitting wing and something else the old place didn't -- a lobby.
NEWS
By Sara Neufeld and Sara Neufeld,SUN STAFF | November 19, 2003
If every community had a Sheppard Pratt Health System, Rosalynn Carter says, her life's work advocating for the mentally ill would be complete. But few communities do. And in this time of budget shortfalls, state-of-the-art psychiatric hospitals aren't likely to start cropping up - which makes Sheppard Pratt's $90 million construction project all the more remarkable, the former first lady said yesterday at a ceremony to thank the donors helping to...
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | April 24, 2003
Promising to make Sheppard Pratt Health System the leading psychiatric institution in the country while maintaining the feel of its 19th-century roots, officials unveiled plans yesterday for a $90 million expansion and renovation project that will include a 200,000-square-foot inpatient hospital. None of the historic buildings on Sheppard Pratt's 110-acre Towson campus will be demolished in the construction, which will begin next month. The new building is designed to complement the Victorian architecture of the existing buildings, said Dr. Steven S. Sharfstein, president and chief executive officer of Sheppard Pratt Health System.
NEWS
February 27, 2003
On February 26, 2003, BARBARAFETCHKO COOPER, age 39, of Baltimore, formerly of Willards, MD; wife of the late Edward J. Cooper; loving daughter of Joseph and Orna-Maie Fetchko; devoted sister of Catherine Hower, Susan Pearson and Joan MacDonald. She is also survived by seven nieces and nephews. Funeral Services will be on Saturday, at 10 A.M., at the Hasting Funeral Home, 19 South Main Street, Selbyville, DE, where friends may call on Friday evening, from 6 to 8 P.M. Interment will be in New Hope Cemetery, Willards, MD. In lieu of flowers, the family suggest contributions to The Memorial Contribution Fund, Sheppard Pratt Health System, P.O. Box 6815, Baltimore, MD 21285.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | September 9, 2002
Sheppard Pratt Health System officials say they will introduce development plans in coming weeks to substantially preserve some of the structures they fought to keep off Baltimore County's list of historic landmarks. Local preservationists fought to put 13 buildings and other structures from the institution's 111-year-old campus on the landmarks list, but last week, the Baltimore County Council voted to leave four of them off. Council members said they were concerned that the restrictions that come with landmark designation would prevent the hospital from modernizing and expanding.
BUSINESS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | December 1, 1999
Sheppard Pratt Health System said it has reached a three-year agreement with Peninsula Regional Medical Center of Salisbury to manage the hospital's 17-bed inpatient adult mental health unit.Sheppard Pratt and the medical center would not disclose the financial terms of the agreement.As part of the deal, Sheppard Pratt, the largest provider of behavioral health care services in Maryland, will manage the 7-year-old unit's clinical and administrative operations.The unit's program director, social worker and two therapists will become Sheppard Pratt employees, but the nursing staff, technicians and other workers will remain with the hospital, said Bill Elliott, the unit's mental health services program director.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | January 10, 1997
With psychiatric care continuing to move away from hospitalization to community treatment, Sheppard Pratt Health System announced yesterday that Way Station, a community mental health program in Frederick, was becoming part of the Sheppard Pratt system.Way Station will keep its names and programs and will operate as a subsidiary of Sheppard Pratt, which has grown beyond its Towson psychiatric hospital into a variety of outpatient treatment sites.Financial terms were not disclosed."Our overall direction and our vision is to move into the community more," said Dr. Steven S. Sharfstein, chief executive officer of Sheppard Pratt.
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | July 29, 2002
Can New York architect Robert Stern help the Sheppard Pratt Health System expand for the future without destroying its priceless buildings from the past? That's what local preservationists are wondering as they wait for Sheppard Pratt, the state's leading provider of psychiatric services, to release preliminary plans for an $80-million to $90-million expansion that Stern and others have been commissioned to design for its 80-acre campus off Charles Street near Towson. The commission is sensitive because Sheppard Pratt is one of the last institutions in the country that retains its configuration from the days when it was an asylum -- a retreat where patients stayed for 80 days or more to receive psychiatric treatment.
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