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By Sloane Brown | December 3, 2000
For some 150 major Enoch Pratt Free Library donors, it was a chance to get up close and personal with a literary legend as the Enoch Pratt Society presented its Lifetime Literary Achievement Award to author John Updike. At a reception before the awards dinner, guests had a chance to chat with the Pulitzer Prize and National Book Award winner and, perhaps, get a book personally inscribed by him. The normally hushed library lobby was filled with the rumble of conversation, as Updike warmly greeted many of those who came to honor him. Included in the group: Bob Hillman, event chair; Ginny Adams, and Peggy Heller, event committee members; Cecil E. Flamer, library board president / chair; Myron Oppenheimer, Ed Brody, Dana Reed, Tyson Tildon, Mary Jo Wagandt, Anne Winter West and Mary Baily Weiler, board members; Dr. Carla Hayden, library executive director; Ron Owens, Friends of the Library president; David M. Schwaber, Monarch Rubber Co. president; Sig Shapiro, Samuel Shapiro & Co. CEO; Eddie Brown, Brown Capital Management president; Joan Marshall, Maryland Prepaid College Trust executive director; Julius Westheimer, Ferris Baker Watts managing director; Gilbert Sandler, Abell Foundation consultant; Dee O'Horan, Radisson Hotel Cross Keys corporate sales manager; and Dr. Emile Bendit, Baltimore psychiatrist.
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NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | April 30, 2014
A financial audit of the Enoch Pratt Free Library found that sloppy bookkeeping and poor oversight have resulted in balance questions, negative accounts and late reimbursements to city coffers. After a presentation before the city's spending panel Wednesday, Council President Bernard C. "Jack" Young asked library officials to return in 90 days to discuss their plan to correct the accounting troubles. Young said while he is a "big supporter of the library system," he is concerned, especially since some of the problems have continued for several years.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | June 21, 2008
Genevieve W. Mason, a retired Baltimore City schools media specialist and teacher who was an Enoch Pratt Free Library activist, died of cancer June 12 at Gilchrist Hospice Center. She was 87 and lived in the Charlestown retirement community. Born Genevieve Walker in Baltimore, she was raised on Druid Hill Avenue and on George Street. She attended Booker T. Washington Junior High School and was a 1938 graduate of Frederick Douglass High School. She earned a degree in education at the old Coppin State Teachers College and completed graduate work in library science at Towson University.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | August 4, 2013
Sidney Silber, a retired real estate developer, philanthropist and accomplished gardener who once ran his family's bakery, died of cancer Tuesday at his Lutherville home. He was 95. Born in Baltimore, he was the son of Isaac and Dora Rodbell Silber. His father had been trained in his native Austria as a baker. The family lived above their bakery at Monroe Street and Westwood Avenue. "Like many of his siblings, my father worked in the store, handled deliveries and ran errands, all as dictated by his father," said his son, Douglas Silber.
NEWS
By MICHAEL PAKENHAM | November 12, 1995
Cleveland, Ohio, which can't afford a football team, annually provides its library system with $23 in local public funding for each city resident. That is close to twice per capita the $13 a year Baltimore's government gives the Enoch Pratt Free Library.Something like $200 million in public funds is being spent to get a football team to move from Cleveland to Baltimore. The Pratt is already here. It should do so well.Seek out people who first discovered in a public library that humans are not born with restraining walls around their capacities for achievement.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | May 15, 2002
Three years after opening a splashy Inner Harbor outpost, the Enoch Pratt Free Library will close its Port Discovery satellite -- a $200,000-a-year enterprise that drew thousands of visitors, some vocal critics and only about six book borrowers a day. The plan to close the Pratt Exploration Center on July 1 for financial reasons -- disclosed in budget documents presented to a City Council committee this week -- prompted cheers from some library activists,...
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | April 15, 2002
Uta Dreher drove four hours from Scranton, Pa., to Baltimore yesterday to be reminded of the Friends who had fed her a daily meal when she was growing up in war-torn Dresden, Germany, after World War II. She was moved to tears at Enoch Pratt Free Library on Cathedral Street, where a traveling exhibit, Quiet Helpers: Quaker Service in Postwar Germany, is on display in the main atrium until May 17. "They changed my life," Dreher, 66, said. "I'm not a Quaker, but I am a nonviolent activist."
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | May 13, 1999
Knock on Carla D. Hayden's door and you're greeted by an unexpected bonus: Her mother, Colleen Hayden, is visiting from Chicago, and it's amazing how alike the two look. Hayden, Enoch Pratt Free Library director, is dressed for work in a comfortable, but tailored beige pants suit. Mom is wearing a beige pants suit from People United. It's fashionably cut, but made from cozy sweat-shirt material. Both women have on handsome earrings and their hair is cropped.Hayden, an honorary chair of Monday's Women's Housing Coalition Annual Kitchen Party, has learned volumes about dressing in Baltimore's wilting summer heat.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | January 19, 2001
With sublime timing worthy of the musicians it celebrates, "The Jazz Age in Paris, 1914-1940" exhibit has arrived at the Enoch Pratt Free Library. The show is a graphically exciting and information-rich complement to "Jazz," filmmaker Ken Burns' exhaustive history of the art form, currently airing on public television. "If you were enticed by the sections of `Jazz' that talked about Paris, [the exhibit offers] a much fuller overview of the wide variety of people working there," says Jeff Thompson, project director for the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service, where the exhibit was originally conceived in expanded form.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,sun reporter | February 9, 2007
Dr. Betty Jean Boulware, former chief of the Enoch Pratt Free Library's neighborhood services division, who earlier in her career had been a branch manager and district supervisor, died Feb. 2 of respiratory failure at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The Hamilton resident was 58. She was born Betty Jean Shearin in Henderson, N.C. At age 7, she moved with her family to a Wolfe Street rowhouse in East Baltimore. While attending Dunbar High School, from which she graduated in 1966, she fell in love with a classmate, Henry Ernest Boulware Jr., whom she married in 1974.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | January 28, 2012
The Canton branch of Baltimore's Enoch Pratt Free Library will close at the end of January for a two-year renovation project. The renovation of the 126-year-old library will include a new meeting room, furniture and circulation desk, additional computers and enhancements for wheelchair accessibility. Additional improvements will also be made to the exterior of the historic building. The library closes beginning Jan. 30. During the renovation, library patrons can visit other nearby locations: Southeast Anchor Library at 3601 Eastern Avenue and the Patterson Park Branch at 158 North Linwood Avenue.
NEWS
The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2011
Three days remain to return overdue library materials to Enoch Pratt Free Library branches without paying fines. The library's "Amnesty Week" runs through Saturday. Fines are being forgiven this week in order to encourage library patrons to register or renew their library cards in September, Library Card Sign-up Month. Normally, the maximum fine on adult or young adult cards is $6 an item. On children's cards the maximum fine is $3 an item. Fine forgiveness does not apply to e-readers, laptops, and materials lent by other library systems.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 2009
SATURDAY MENCKEN DAY CELEBRATION: The Enoch Pratt Free Library, 400 Cathedral St., celebrates a major influence on American culture and a favorite son of Charm City. See pieces from the library's extensive collection and join discussions about the "Sage of Baltimore," H.L. Mencken, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Call 410-396-5430 or go to prattlibrary.org. HAMPDENFEST: Hon Fest's lesser-known sibling attracts more of a local crowd to the Avenue in Hampden for a relatively beehive-free Saturday featuring live music, art, crafts and food.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | September 4, 2009
This weekend, the Pratt presents one of the most joyous surprises of recent feature-length cartoons: George Miller's "Happy Feet," in which two very different superstars play Mumbles the penguin. Frodo himself, Elijah Wood, provides the character's voice. More important, tap genius Savion Glover provides the character's moves as dancer and choreographer. You see, in an emperor penguin society that values vocalizing, little Mumbles can't carry a tune. But the lad can dance, and he eventually finds five new buddies who declare him their "Big Guy."
NEWS
By Karen Anderson and Karen Anderson,Capital News Service | June 14, 2009
As Baltimore's unemployment rate rose, many people headed to the library. Since the onset of the recession, attendance at the Enoch Pratt Free Library's career center classes has jumped 92 percent. For free, the Central Library on Cathedral Street in downtown Baltimore offers a range of classes that teach how to build a resume, network strategically, search and apply for jobs online, make job seekers' employment "recession-proof," get a federal job in 10 steps and develop basic interviewing skills.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,kate.shatzkin@baltsun.com | May 7, 2009
Moms, it's your weekend. And if you're the kind who wants to spend it having fun with the family - instead of holed up solo with a glass of wine and a good book - there are plenty of kid-friendly activities to choose from around town. You can explore the outdoor beauty at Ladew Topiary Gardens in Monkton and take a free tour of art depicting the roles of women at the Walters. Help your kids make your Mother's Day gift (hey, at least that way you're sure to get one) at a local library. Take in a concert that explores the relationships between mothers and daughters.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | May 1, 1996
FOR YEARS, the city school system and the Enoch Pratt Free Library were criticized for behaving as though they weren't on the same planet.It's ironic, then, that the city budget crisis may force the Pratt to close a third of its neighborhood branches just as the two systems have realized they are Siamese twins.The libraries need the schools, and boy, do the schools need the libraries! In recent years, dozens of librarians have left the school system, until only 36 of 182 schools have full-time librarians.
NEWS
By Carla D. Hayden | January 20, 2009
President-elect Barack Obama has stated that "literacy is the highway to success" and that libraries represent "a window to a larger world." Adviser David Axelrod recently said libraries will be part of the proposed economic stimulus package. As the nation and the world look to a new chapter in history, these statements leave me optimistic. During these tough economic times, library services across the nation are in great demand. Families are examining their budgets and turning to libraries more than ever.
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