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By Chris Kaltenbach | August 29, 1997
TBS winds up its week-long run of 90-minute "Little House on the Prairie" (9: 05 a.m.-10: 35 a.m.) episodes with the unlikely pairing of the scarecrow from "The Wizard of Oz" and Mary Richards' Aunt Flo (the one who so bedeviled Lou Grant).The episode, titled "Dance With Me," features veteran troupers Ray Bolger and Eileen Heckart, as Laura and Albert (Melissa Gilbert and Matthew Laborteaux) conspire to spark a romance between a hard- drinking house guest and a prim and proper older lady.
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By Kathy Hudsonhudmud@aol.com | January 13, 2012
When Baltimore City cut the grass on the Roland Avenue median for the last time this fall, an adjacent plot of grass was skipped. The point at the intersection of Roland Avenue, Ridgewood Road and Cold Spring Lane looked like a prairie for months.  With warmer temperatures into January, the grass continued to grow.   At the end of October, I called 311.  They said the city would take action in 14 business days. We watched. We waited. Nothing happened. During November and December, the point looked increasingly shabby.
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By LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 27, 1999
GRAYSLAKE, Ill. -- It takes some time to appreciate a prairie.A prairie can't awe with the grandeur of a redwood. A prairie can't seduce with the mystery of a canyon. Nor does a prairie entice exploration, the way a mountain range does. There's no glamorous surf, no spectacular waterfall tossing off shards of rainbow."We in the Midwest have always suffered a bit of an inferiority complex," said Alan Pollom, director of the Kansas Nature Conservancy. "We don't have oceans. We don't have mountains.
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By Benn Ray | July 18, 2011
Whew. Let me tell ya, things in Hampden are really heating up this summer. Ha! I don't know why it's fun writing in clichés, but it is. I mean it's also true. I'm writing this at the tail end of a mini-heat wave (do people just not use that phrase anymore?) and I'm trying to edit down a long list of awesome upcoming events just to fit my column size. The Pavement to Prairie Party kicks off July 25 at the ACCE School in the Robert Poole complex, 1300 W. 36th St. More than 300 volunteers, including 200 from the Vans Warped Tour, will be pulling up almost an acre of asphalt and converting the area to turf and conservation landscaping.
NEWS
June 30, 2006
TV PICK--A Sparrow's Return--Kent County is home to resource experiments that include restoring sparrows to a prairie. (MPT, Tuesday, 7:30 p.m.)
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | October 30, 1992
Pollsters' computers need surge protectors.When a businessman of Ross' stature invests $36.7 million in a month on a seemingly lost cause, the reasonable person asks if he knows something.Liberia is turning into another Somalia, but this one is ours.A revisionist claims that the "Little House" books were not written by a prairie woman named Wilder, but by another prairie woman named Wilder.
FEATURES
January 4, 2000
Be a 4Kids Detective When you know the answers to these questions, go to www.4Kids.org/detectives/ What architect designed Central Park? (Go to www.wnet.org/newyork/laic/ to find out.) What does the word "origami" mean? How much prairie has been lost in the past 150 years? ENTER THE FOLD Learn all about the wonderful art of paper folding at Pieces 'n' Creases, a terrific Web site dedicated to the beautiful pastime of origami. Travel east toward tqjunior.advanced.org/5402/, and get ready for some fun folding action.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tricia Bishop | March 16, 2000
Return to `Little House' Seventy years ago at the urging of her daughter Rose, Laura Ingalls Wilder began to write down the stories of her pioneer childhood that she'd often shared when Rose was just a girl. Two years later, in 1932, the first of the seven books chronicling Wilder's life hit the shelves with the title "Little House in the Big Woods." In it, a 4- and then 5-year-old Laura showed readers the way of life on the prairie, from panther attacks to maple-tree sapping. Many of us grew up right alongside her, with her books tucked in our knapsacks and her adventures stored in our hearts.
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By Kathy Hudsonhudmud@aol.com | January 13, 2012
When Baltimore City cut the grass on the Roland Avenue median for the last time this fall, an adjacent plot of grass was skipped. The point at the intersection of Roland Avenue, Ridgewood Road and Cold Spring Lane looked like a prairie for months.  With warmer temperatures into January, the grass continued to grow.   At the end of October, I called 311.  They said the city would take action in 14 business days. We watched. We waited. Nothing happened. During November and December, the point looked increasingly shabby.
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | September 22, 1996
WASHINGTON -- When your woods are on fire, your home washed away, it's hard to see fire and flood as anything but calamities, but scientists see nature maintaining its ecological balance.Let your gaze sweep across the planet, these scientists say, and the forces of nature become forces for good, causing far less harm than our attempts to bring them under control.Two studies reported in recent issues of Science, the journal of the American Academy for the Advancement of Science, conclude that natural disasters help maintain nature's balance in places as different as the prairies of Wisconsin and the rivers of northern California.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2010
Henry Michael Cedrone, a retired machinist and musician who had an "uncanny ability" to keep people on the dance floor, died of respiratory failure Sept. 18 at St. Joseph Medical Center. He was 89 and lived in Lutherville. Born in Baltimore, he was raised on Granby Street in what was an Italian-Jewish immigrant near the Shot Tower and Little Italy. As a child, he listened to his father playing the accordion with other neighbors who played guitar and piano. He had an ear for music and picked up the instruments on his own. He was also a good singer.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith | December 1, 2009
The windows of the Westons' house, located 60 miles northwest of Tulsa, are covered with dark paper year-round. The inhabitants "don't differentiate between night and day." They're content to be trapped in a long, dim tunnel of memories, some suppressed and others obsessed over, until one family member chooses to escape the hard way. Ramifications of that decision provide abundant fuel for the three-hour-plus running time of "August: Osage County," the 2008 Pulitzer Prize- and Tony Award-winning roller-coaster of a play by Tracy Letts that is now at the Kennedy Center's Eisenhower Theater.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith | tim.smith@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | December 1, 2009
The windows of the Westons' house, located 60 miles northwest of Tulsa, are covered with dark paper year-round. The inhabitants "don't differentiate between night and day." They're content to be trapped in a long, dim tunnel of memories, some suppressed and others obsessed over, until one family member chooses to escape the hard way. Ramifications of that decision provide abundant fuel for the three-hour-plus running time of "August: Osage County," the 2008 Pulitzer Prize- and Tony Award-winning roller-coaster of a play by Tracy Letts that is now at the Kennedy Center's Eisenhower Theater.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | June 12, 2009
It took just 10 minutes for a dozen prairie dogs to outwit the creators of the Maryland Zoo's new $500,000 habitat. Aircraft wire, poured concrete and slick plastic walls proved no match for the fast-footed rodents, the stars of a new exhibit that opens today. As officials were promoting the return of the zoo's 28 prairie dogs - their former digs had been out of sight in a closed section of the animal preserve for more than four years - some of the critters found ways to jump, climb and get over the walls of their prairie paradise, a centerpiece exhibit just inside the zoo's main entrance.
BUSINESS
By Rita St. Clair and Rita St. Clair,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | June 29, 2008
We recently purchased an 80-year-old house that needs a lot of interior renovation. Can you give us some guidelines on how to proceed? The real estate agent described the house as an example of the Prairie Style. We're not sure what that means, but there's plenty of dark oak on the walls and floors, which we may not want to retain. To identify one's needs and wishes - both aesthetic and functional - it's essential to be aware of a home's architectural style. Such an understanding will help in deciding what design direction to follow ... or to depart from.
NEWS
By Nicholas Riccardi and Nicholas Riccardi,Los Angeles Times | October 28, 2007
HAVILAND, Kan. -- Steve Arnold is driving the yellow Hummer in circles around a Kiowa County wheat field, towing an 18-foot-wide metal detector. For an hour, nothing but silence. Finally, the detector whines, and Arnold slams the brakes. "That is so good," he says. Arnold jumps out, pinpoints the location with a smaller detector and starts digging. The renowned meteorite hunter is hoping for a big score. He has had three false hits today, unearthing a bit of barbed wire, a fragment of a plow, a squashed Dr Pepper can. "What's the definition of insanity?"
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | July 9, 2000
MEDORA, N.D. - Young Theodore Roosevelt thought western North Dakota an eerie, lonely place when he came here in 1883 to bag one of the few remaining wild bison on the northern Great Plains. Yet the future 26th president of the United States fell in love with the stark beauty of the undulating grasslands and of the Badlands, with their variegated canyons and jutting buttes. It was here that Roosevelt honed the conservation ethic that became a hallmark of his presidency. He dabbled in cattle ranching along the Little Missouri River and immersed himself for a few years in the fading lifestyle of the cowboy before returning to his political destiny back East.
NEWS
May 8, 2007
Nothing odd about tornadoes in Kansas. The state lies right in the center of the flat Midwestern prairie known as Tornado Alley, where fast-moving funnels of air are so common that one became a literary device - used to lift Dorothy's house to Oz in L. Frank Baum's 1900 novel. And yet the magnitude of devastation when a small town such as Greensburg, Kan., gets literally knocked flat commands attention. It's a reminder of the vast power of nature to take away as well as to give. And of the predictable dangers that threaten Americans every day for which the nation could be better prepared.
NEWS
May 8, 2007
Nothing odd about tornadoes in Kansas. The state lies right in the center of the flat Midwestern prairie known as Tornado Alley, where fast-moving funnels of air are so common that one became a literary device - used to lift Dorothy's house to Oz in L. Frank Baum's 1900 novel. And yet the magnitude of devastation when a small town such as Greensburg, Kan., gets literally knocked flat commands attention. It's a reminder of the vast power of nature to take away as well as to give. And of the predictable dangers that threaten Americans every day for which the nation could be better prepared.
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