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NEWS
September 11, 2002
Claudius Rogers Hall Jr., who practiced law in Westminster for many years, died of pneumonia Thursday at University of Virginia hospital in Charlottesville. He was 78 and formerly resided in New Windsor. Born and raised in Eldersburg, Mr. Hall was a graduate of Sykesville High School. He earned his bachelor's degree from the University of Maryland, and his law degree from the University of Baltimore. He served in the Marine Corps in the Pacific during World War II. Mr. Hall, who maintained a general law practice for years, started his career in the 1950s in Baltimore.
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NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Sun reporter | June 8, 2007
Former Montgomery County delegate, county executive candidate and well-known sports heckler Robin K.A. Ficker is out of the practice of law for at least a year. The Maryland Court of Appeals suspended his law license yesterday, saying that despite four previous warnings, he ran his Bethesda law office in a slipshod way to the detriment of clients. "I will be back practicing in a year," Ficker said yesterday, adding that his associates will continue to staff the office without him. With his real estate sales business, efforts to roll back the state sales tax and other initiatives, he said, "I've got plenty on my plate."
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BUSINESS
January 31, 1996
McGuire, Woods, Battle & Boothe LLP has named John S. Graham III as partner-in-charge of the law firm's Baltimore office.Mr. Graham, 51, is a partner in the law firm's commercial practice section, and is active in domestic and international energy and resource issues. He has worked from the firm's Baltimore office since 1991."The managing [partner]-in-charge role is largely administrative," said Mr. Graham. "I expect to continue the practice of law, which is what I really love. I'll also be working with partners and associates as they build their practices."
BUSINESS
By CAROLYN BIGDA and CAROLYN BIGDA,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | June 4, 2006
Susan Kim, 33, has an enviable job. Based in San Francisco, she writes about food, travel and homes for Coastal Living magazine. But her current career is a far departure from what she started doing after college. After graduating from the University of Michigan's law school in 1998, she joined a firm in downtown Chicago, practicing real estate law. Finding the hours to be grueling -- the dot-com era was just heating up -- Kim relocated to San Francisco in hopes that a new firm would pack less pressure.
BUSINESS
By CAROLYN BIGDA and CAROLYN BIGDA,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | June 4, 2006
Susan Kim, 33, has an enviable job. Based in San Francisco, she writes about food, travel and homes for Coastal Living magazine. But her current career is a far departure from what she started doing after college. After graduating from the University of Michigan's law school in 1998, she joined a firm in downtown Chicago, practicing real estate law. Finding the hours to be grueling -- the dot-com era was just heating up -- Kim relocated to San Francisco in hopes that a new firm would pack less pressure.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Sun reporter | June 8, 2007
Former Montgomery County delegate, county executive candidate and well-known sports heckler Robin K.A. Ficker is out of the practice of law for at least a year. The Maryland Court of Appeals suspended his law license yesterday, saying that despite four previous warnings, he ran his Bethesda law office in a slipshod way to the detriment of clients. "I will be back practicing in a year," Ficker said yesterday, adding that his associates will continue to staff the office without him. With his real estate sales business, efforts to roll back the state sales tax and other initiatives, he said, "I've got plenty on my plate."
NEWS
October 4, 1999
ANOTHER tour de force of lobbying by the masterful Bruce Bereano cannot be allowed to obscure his felony conviction -- and the necessity of removing him from the practice of law.He should be disbarred or, at least, suspended from practice for a substantial length of time.Mr. Bereano's breathtaking success at enlisting the mighty to his defense (a retinue that included the presiding judge in his case!) demonstrates only that Mr. Bereano's skill in developing relationships is second to none.
NEWS
By Cameron Kenny | December 2, 1994
LIKE MANY other law school graduates, I just learned that I passed the Connecticut State Bar examination and I'm tickled pink. I think the last time I was so excited was when Pepsi started dating its cans for freshness.Passing the bar means that I now have the authority to practice law, which in my estimation ranks in importance between having the authority to donate my organs and having the authority to feel superior to Connie Chung. Put another way, the only thing in life more tiresome than the potential practice of law is the actual study of law. Yet, despite the growing public awareness that law school and all things legal are monstrously dull, the nation's law schools keep filling up at an alarming rate.
NEWS
By Gerald K. McOscar | October 24, 1990
RECENTLY a friend asked if I enjoy the practice of law as much today as I did 12 years ago upon graduating law school. I replied that I enjoy the intellectual challenge (and if truth be known the prestige and income the law offers), but I no longer look to the law with a sense of reverence or as a source of justice. She seemed puzzled.Trying to put my feelings into words, I cautioned that skepticism is not cynicism and that the disappointment that always accompanies reality is not the same as despair.
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN and FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN,SUN REPORTER | October 27, 2005
William G. Kemp Jr., a retired lawyer and decorated World War II veteran, died of heart failure Friday at his home in Elkton. He was 86. Born in Baltimore and raised on Cliftview Avenue, Mr. Kemp graduated in 1935 from City College. He was attending Marietta College in Ohio when he left to enlist in the Army at the outbreak of World War II. Trained as a parachute instructor, Mr. Kemp was sent to Europe as a parachute infantry unit commander after attaining the rank of captain. While serving with the Office of Strategic Services, he parachuted behind German lines in North Africa and France.
NEWS
By LAURA CADIZ and LAURA CADIZ,SUN REPORTER | October 29, 2005
When clients visit Bob Bohan's Annapolis law office, his priorities soon become apparent. There's an 8-by-10-inch photo of his foxhound, Maddy, displayed prominently in a cherry wood frame at the edge of his desk. A much smaller photo of his wife, Barbara, is on the other side of the desk. So it should come as no surprise that Bohan is carving out a niche in the growing field known as animal law, advising his elderly, two-legged clients on issues involving their furred dependents. "As people are growing older and in some cases outliving children, I've seen a number of cases where the pets become the most important players in providing companionship," said Bohan.
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN and FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN,SUN REPORTER | October 27, 2005
William G. Kemp Jr., a retired lawyer and decorated World War II veteran, died of heart failure Friday at his home in Elkton. He was 86. Born in Baltimore and raised on Cliftview Avenue, Mr. Kemp graduated in 1935 from City College. He was attending Marietta College in Ohio when he left to enlist in the Army at the outbreak of World War II. Trained as a parachute instructor, Mr. Kemp was sent to Europe as a parachute infantry unit commander after attaining the rank of captain. While serving with the Office of Strategic Services, he parachuted behind German lines in North Africa and France.
NEWS
September 11, 2002
Claudius Rogers Hall Jr., who practiced law in Westminster for many years, died of pneumonia Thursday at University of Virginia hospital in Charlottesville. He was 78 and formerly resided in New Windsor. Born and raised in Eldersburg, Mr. Hall was a graduate of Sykesville High School. He earned his bachelor's degree from the University of Maryland, and his law degree from the University of Baltimore. He served in the Marine Corps in the Pacific during World War II. Mr. Hall, who maintained a general law practice for years, started his career in the 1950s in Baltimore.
NEWS
October 4, 1999
ANOTHER tour de force of lobbying by the masterful Bruce Bereano cannot be allowed to obscure his felony conviction -- and the necessity of removing him from the practice of law.He should be disbarred or, at least, suspended from practice for a substantial length of time.Mr. Bereano's breathtaking success at enlisting the mighty to his defense (a retinue that included the presiding judge in his case!) demonstrates only that Mr. Bereano's skill in developing relationships is second to none.
BUSINESS
January 31, 1996
McGuire, Woods, Battle & Boothe LLP has named John S. Graham III as partner-in-charge of the law firm's Baltimore office.Mr. Graham, 51, is a partner in the law firm's commercial practice section, and is active in domestic and international energy and resource issues. He has worked from the firm's Baltimore office since 1991."The managing [partner]-in-charge role is largely administrative," said Mr. Graham. "I expect to continue the practice of law, which is what I really love. I'll also be working with partners and associates as they build their practices."
NEWS
By PETER A. JAY | March 5, 1995
Havre de Grace. -- Pad. Pad. Pad.I have heard the soft feline footsteps behind me before, but they were fainter then. These past few weeks and months they've seemed to draw closer, sometimes sounding close enough to make me look over my shoulder. But when I pause and stareback along the way I have come, I know all along that I'll see nothing.It might be that a shadow will move in an unfamiliar way, suggesting the presence of a great sinuous form just beyond the limits of vision, and my pulse rate will shoot up for a minute ortwo.
NEWS
By PETER A. JAY | March 5, 1995
Havre de Grace. -- Pad. Pad. Pad.I have heard the soft feline footsteps behind me before, but they were fainter then. These past few weeks and months they've seemed to draw closer, sometimes sounding close enough to make me look over my shoulder. But when I pause and stareback along the way I have come, I know all along that I'll see nothing.It might be that a shadow will move in an unfamiliar way, suggesting the presence of a great sinuous form just beyond the limits of vision, and my pulse rate will shoot up for a minute ortwo.
NEWS
October 23, 1994
The two candidates for Anne Arundel County state's attorney were at The Sun newsroom in Pasadena on Oct. 10 to debate. Incumbent Democrat Frank Weathersbee and Republican John Greiber were questioned by three Sun reporters for more than an hour. What follows is an edited transcript of that exchange.Mr. Weathersbee, does it harm prosecutions for assistant state's attorneys to engage in part-time private practice?Weathersbee: No, I don't think so. In a majority of the offices throughout the state, part-time practice is allowed.
NEWS
By Cameron Kenny | December 2, 1994
LIKE MANY other law school graduates, I just learned that I passed the Connecticut State Bar examination and I'm tickled pink. I think the last time I was so excited was when Pepsi started dating its cans for freshness.Passing the bar means that I now have the authority to practice law, which in my estimation ranks in importance between having the authority to donate my organs and having the authority to feel superior to Connie Chung. Put another way, the only thing in life more tiresome than the potential practice of law is the actual study of law. Yet, despite the growing public awareness that law school and all things legal are monstrously dull, the nation's law schools keep filling up at an alarming rate.
NEWS
October 23, 1994
The two candidates for Anne Arundel County state's attorney were at The Sun newsroom in Pasadena on Oct. 10 to debate. Incumbent Democrat Frank Weathersbee and Republican John Greiber were questioned by three Sun reporters for more than an hour. What follows is an edited transcript of that exchange.Mr. Weathersbee, does it harm prosecutions for assistant state's attorneys to engage in part-time private practice?Weathersbee: No, I don't think so. In a majority of the offices throughout the state, part-time practice is allowed.
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