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NEWS
October 6, 2013
When I was growing up and I had friends over to play, sometimes discussions and arguments were part of the activities. If the squabbling continued with no resolution in sight, my mother would usually intervene and suggest that my friends go home. It sounds as if similar rationale should be used with Washington. So come election day, my suggestion is that we send all incumbents home - Republicans and Democrats. Since it really does take two to tango, neither side is without blame, for as a wise person once told me, there are three sides to every story - my side, your side and the truth.
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NEWS
October 6, 2013
When I was growing up and I had friends over to play, sometimes discussions and arguments were part of the activities. If the squabbling continued with no resolution in sight, my mother would usually intervene and suggest that my friends go home. It sounds as if similar rationale should be used with Washington. So come election day, my suggestion is that we send all incumbents home - Republicans and Democrats. Since it really does take two to tango, neither side is without blame, for as a wise person once told me, there are three sides to every story - my side, your side and the truth.
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NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | October 23, 1997
About 200 inmates at the Baltimore City Detention Center are on quarantine after two cases of chicken pox were diagnosed at the jail last week."It's virtually a lockdown. There's no movement at all," said Lamont W. Flanagan, commissioner for Pretrial Detention Services.The two cases of chicken pox were diagnosed Oct. 13 in the jail's annex, a minimum-security area that houses 400 inmates on four tiers. The chicken pox cases were discovered on two tiers.Those two tiers will remain quarantined until Nov. 2.Dr.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2012
Maryland's children would be required to get more vaccines before attending school under a proposal being considered by state health officials. But doctors and state health officials said most children are already getting the shots and that they are looking to regulate the process. Under the proposed guidelines, pupils would be required to get a chicken pox booster before starting kindergarten. The chicken pox vaccine is now required to be given to babies. Seventh-graders would be required to get the Tdap vaccine, which protects against tetanus, diphtheria and whooping cough.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2012
Maryland's children would be required to get more vaccines before attending school under a proposal being considered by state health officials. But doctors and state health officials said most children are already getting the shots and that they are looking to regulate the process. Under the proposed guidelines, pupils would be required to get a chicken pox booster before starting kindergarten. The chicken pox vaccine is now required to be given to babies. Seventh-graders would be required to get the Tdap vaccine, which protects against tetanus, diphtheria and whooping cough.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | July 28, 2000
Arafat never misses an opportunity to miss an opportunity. (Abba Eban said it first; no plagiarism here.) If the election is too close to call in Maryland, Bush must be a lock nationwide. West Nile virus in New York, plum pox in Pennsylvania. this globalization has gone too far. Every comparable span near Baltimore, Philly, and NY charges tolls. Why not the next Woodrow Wilson Bridge over the Potomac?
NEWS
By LYNN ANDERSON and LYNN ANDERSON,SUN REPORTER | July 5, 2006
Getting stuck with a needle - four times, no less, twice in each arm - was not Aminah Lambertis' idea of the proper way to spend a sunny summer afternoon. No, the pool at Baltimore's Druid Hill Park was where she'd rather have been. But her mother was insistent that the 14-year-old get the vaccinations that she'd need for the coming school year, thus the four shots, one each for hepatitis A and B, meningitis and chicken pox, which were administered by a nurse in a public health vehicle that visits city neighborhoods.
NEWS
By ANICA BUTLER and ANICA BUTLER,SUN REPORTER | July 12, 2006
Children entering grades five through nine this fall may need to get extra shots this summer to comply with new statewide immunization requirements. If students don't have documentation that they have received vaccinations for chicken pox and hepatitis B by the first day of school, they will be turned away, said Rhonda Gill, the school system's director of student services. "They won't be able to attend school. That's what makes it a very serious matter," Gill said. School system officials are sending letters to parents, and information about the shots needed is available on the county schools' Web site and from the Anne Arundel County Department of Health.
FEATURES
By Holly Selby | August 16, 2007
As the first day of school approaches, parents are checking to make sure their children are up to date on their vaccines. By the time Maryland children enter kindergarten, they are required to have been vaccinated against 11 diseases -- diphtheria, pertussis, Hib (haemophilus influenza), pneumococcus, tetanus, polio, measles, mumps, rubella, hepatitis and chicken pox. And, this year, both the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the American Academy of Pediatrics are recommending that children receive four new vaccines: a booster for chicken pox, rotavirus, hepatitis A and the human papillomavirus, says Julie Yeh, assistant chair of pediatrics at the Greater Baltimore Medical Center.
FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen | December 31, 1995
From The Sun Dec. 31, 1845-Jan. 6, 1846* Jan. 1: NEW YEAR'S DAY is an appropriate successor to the Christmas holydays. A season of festivity attends the closing year, and upon the advent of the new we concern ourselves to a season of reflection.* Jan. 2: John H. Meade, of Baltimore, had his leg badly broken at Providence, R.I., on Monday last by being struck by a locomotive.* Jan. 5: Small Pox at Leonardtown -- We regret to learn from the Leonardtown Beacon that the small pox had made its appearance in St. Mary's County.
FEATURES
By Holly Selby | August 16, 2007
As the first day of school approaches, parents are checking to make sure their children are up to date on their vaccines. By the time Maryland children enter kindergarten, they are required to have been vaccinated against 11 diseases -- diphtheria, pertussis, Hib (haemophilus influenza), pneumococcus, tetanus, polio, measles, mumps, rubella, hepatitis and chicken pox. And, this year, both the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the American Academy of Pediatrics are recommending that children receive four new vaccines: a booster for chicken pox, rotavirus, hepatitis A and the human papillomavirus, says Julie Yeh, assistant chair of pediatrics at the Greater Baltimore Medical Center.
NEWS
By Brent Jones and Brent Jones,Sun Reporter | February 13, 2007
Outreach teams began knocking on doors in Baltimore neighborhoods yesterday in search of the 1,847 students who've been barred from school since Jan. 22 because they have failed to get immunizations required by a new state law. Baltimore has the bulk of the state's approximately 3,000 students who are ineligible to attend school because they lack the required vaccinations against hepatitis B and chicken pox, according to the Maryland State Department of...
NEWS
By Judy Foreman and Judy Foreman,Special to the Sun | September 15, 2006
I've heard there's a now vaccine against shingles. Should I get it? If you are 60 or older, you should strongly consider getting the new vaccine, which was approved recently by the Food and Drug Administration. "Shingles is an under-recognized, serious neurological disease that can lead to an extremely painful condition called post-herpetic neuralgia," said Dr. Anne Louise Oaklander, a shingles expert and associate professor of neurology at Harvard Medical School. The new vaccine, called Zostavax, appears to reduce the risk of shingles and the neuralgia and seems to be safe, said Oaklander, who has no financial ties to the manufacturer, Merck & Co. Shingles, which affects an estimated 1 million people each year, is caused by reactivation of a herpes virus called varicella zoster, the same virus that causes chicken pox. Most American adults have been exposed to chicken pox - and therefore are at risk of shingles.
NEWS
By ANICA BUTLER and ANICA BUTLER,SUN REPORTER | July 12, 2006
Children entering grades five through nine this fall may need to get extra shots this summer to comply with new statewide immunization requirements. If students don't have documentation that they have received vaccinations for chicken pox and hepatitis B by the first day of school, they will be turned away, said Rhonda Gill, the school system's director of student services. "They won't be able to attend school. That's what makes it a very serious matter," Gill said. School system officials are sending letters to parents, and information about the shots needed is available on the county schools' Web site and from the Anne Arundel County Department of Health.
NEWS
By LYNN ANDERSON and LYNN ANDERSON,SUN REPORTER | July 5, 2006
Getting stuck with a needle - four times, no less, twice in each arm - was not Aminah Lambertis' idea of the proper way to spend a sunny summer afternoon. No, the pool at Baltimore's Druid Hill Park was where she'd rather have been. But her mother was insistent that the 14-year-old get the vaccinations that she'd need for the coming school year, thus the four shots, one each for hepatitis A and B, meningitis and chicken pox, which were administered by a nurse in a public health vehicle that visits city neighborhoods.
NEWS
By Delthia Ricks and Delthia Ricks,NEWSDAY | June 2, 2005
Many cases of shingles may be prevented with an experimental vaccine that could be on the market as early as next spring, medical experts said yesterday. The disorder, typified in many cases by excruciating pain, itching and throbbing, is caused by a resurgence of the chicken pox virus, usually after age 60. Varicella zoster, the microbe that causes both shingles and chicken pox, retreats after a childhood bout with the itchy and blistering condition, only to resurface decades later as shingles, a nerve-damaging disorder that sometimes is so painful that people have considered suicide.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | April 22, 2001
Ask Lemar Johnson for a list of his favorite books, and he'll include "Hop on Pop" and "The Berenstain Bears and the Double Dare." But best of all is "Green Eggs and Ham" - the 5-year-old kindergartner at Rognel Heights Elementary/Middle School learned the story of Sam-I-Am practically by heart when he was 3. His father, Lance Johnson Sr., had an interactive computer program at home that recounted the Dr. Seuss classic - over and over. "He played the CD-ROM constantly ... " said Johnson, 30. "He learned it well.
NEWS
November 21, 2004
IT KILLED MORE than 30 million people in the 20th century. Its capacity to injure quickly and spread widely once sent cold shivers down the spine. Its endurance confounded scientists. Most Americans assumed they had heard the last of smallpox nearly three decades ago when, after a global vaccination campaign, the disease was declared eradicated - save two remaining stocks left purposely in deep freeze. Now with post-9/11 debates about bioterrorism the norm, smallpox fear is back. This time however, it's an international health agency raising anxieties.
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