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NEWS
February 19, 1992
Two U.S. senators on a fact-finding mission to Moscow say they have found information that could explain what happened to hundreds of American prisoners of war listed as missing in action from World War II and the Korean and Vietnam wars. However, they found no evidence that any POWs or MIAs still are alive. Russian officials have promised to intercede with Vietnam and Laos to urge the two governments to cooperate with U.S. investigators.The Evening Sun would like to know if you feel any of the unaccounted-for American POWs or MIAs still are alive.
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NEWS
June 10, 2014
I served 24 years in the United States Army, 21 of them in Special Forces, and I fought in two combat campaigns, El Salvador and Operation Iraqi Freedom. Command Sgt. Major Dan Pitzer, a former prisoner of war in Vietnam and later a senior civilian instructor for the Army's SERE school was a close friend of mine. He shared many experiences with me about his four years as a captive of the Viet Cong. Unlike Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl, Sergeant Pitzer did not "walk away" from his unit and actively seek refuge with the enemy ( "Bergdahl is free, but at what cost," June 9)
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NEWS
By ROBERT A. ERLANDSON | August 13, 1995
Allen Beauchamp of Timonium, Jay Rye of Orchard Beach and James Rubard of Catonsville are not about to second-guess the reasons for dropping atomic bombs on Japan.Instead, as the world marks the 50th anniversary of the deadly attacks on Hiroshima and Nagasaki that brought World War II to a sudden end, they and thousands of other former prisoners of war remember only that the bombs saved their lives.They were among some 200,000 surviving Allied military and civilian POWs held in camps throughout Asia -- 36,000 of them Americans, many held captive since the fall of the Philippines in April 1942.
NEWS
By Joseph Swartz | June 4, 2014
Recently, I helped found Millennial Maryland, a group that advocates a different vision for both Maryland and the Republican Party. That vision includes an understanding of the wider world, the embrace of civility and the constant pursuit of intellectual knowledge. Allow me to take this moment to underscore why these things matter. On his blog Monday, Allen West, retired U.S. Army lieutenant colonel and former Florida GOP congressman, posted a video of Bob Bergdahl, the father of recovered POW and potential deserter Bowe Bergdahl.
NEWS
By Douglas Lamborne and Douglas Lamborne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 13, 2000
JACK FELLOWES spent six years, seven months and 22 days in places nicknamed the Zoo, Camp Hope, Skid Row and, ultimately, the Hanoi Hilton. He and his fellow pilots were left to the tender mercies of Weasel, Pig Eye, Rabbit, Rat and Spanky. Fellowes, a 1956 graduate of the Naval Academy and resident of Annapolis, had much to think about this past Veterans Day weekend, thoughts of quick violence and years of numbing imprisonment in North Vietnam. And comradeship. On his 55th mission, on Aug. 27, 1966, he set off in an A-6 Intruder from the USS Constellation to attack some river barges in North Vietnam "My wingman, Bob Williams, told me we were being tracked [by radar]
NEWS
By Knut Royce and Knut Royce,Newsday | January 3, 1992
WASHINGTON -- A retired intelligence officer who monitored intercepted communications from Vietnam for the National Security Agency claims in an affidavit to Congress that he has personal knowledge of more than 400 American prisoners being held there in 1984 and knew of many others transferred as laborers to the former Soviet Union.Retired Air Force Tech. Sgt. Terrell A. Minarcin, a cryptolinguist and communications specialist for the NSA until July 1984, asserts in his sworn affidavit that between 200 and 300 American prisoners of war were shipped to the Soviet Union in 1983.
NEWS
By Newsday | January 5, 1993
WASHINGTON -- A special Senate committee report concludes that American prisoners of war probably were left behind in Southeast Asia when the United States pulled out of the Vietnam War in 1973.The carefully worded report, prepared by the staff of the Senate Select Committee on POW-MIA Affairs after more than a year's investigation, says the panel found no hard evidence that specific prisoners were "consciously left behind," according to portions of a draft document.Nevertheless, it asserts that the committee's review of data compiled by consecutive administrations over the past two decades found information supporting the likelihood of the "survival at least for some [POWs]
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Tom Keyser and Thomas W. Waldron and Tom Keyser,Evening Sun Staff | January 22, 1991
Lt. Jeffrey N. Zaun and retired Capt. Edwin A. "Ned" Shuman 3rd have a lot in common -- they're Naval Academy graduates, they flew fighters for the Navy's VA-35 squadron and they were both captured by the enemy on bombing runs -- Zaun some time in the last week, Shuman 23 years ago.Shuman spent five years in the notorious "Hanoi Hilton" prisoner-of-war camp in North Vietnam after being shot down on St. Patrick's Day 1968. He suffered torture and physical abuse he refuses to describe for fear of disturbing the family and friends of American servicemen.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | July 19, 1995
MOSCOW -- Russian soldiers taken prisoner by the Chechens and later released are now being told they have to compensate the government for the loss of their Kalashnikov automatic rifles.The military says the soldiers must pay $693.52 for a weapon, even though a typical draftee makes $2 a month. Refusal to pay, the soldiers have been warned, will result in criminal prosecution.In response to an inquiry from The Sun, an Interior Ministry spokesman said yesterday the officer who sent out the demand was "overzealous."
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | February 20, 1993
"TC We'll start with Chuck Sewell's contemplation of a matchbook, because it is the kind of thing to be relished in history lessons: the incidental anecdote that tells all.HAUSHALTSWAREThat's the word on a matchbook glued into the scrapbook Chuck Sewell, a Baltimore boy, kept as a prisoner of war in Nazi Germany nearly 50 years ago. The matchbook measures about 1 1/2 by 2 inches. Sewell, or a fellow prisoner in Stalag Luft IV, in Stettin, near the Baltic Sea, must have passed time examining the long German words on the matchbook.
NEWS
June 2, 2014
The release Saturday of Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl after five years as a prisoner of the Taliban in Afghanistan and Pakistan surely marked a jubilant moment for his family and friends in Boise, Idaho. Sgt. Bergdahl went missing from his unit in 2009 under circumstances that remain unclear, and he was captured by Taliban six months into his first tour of duty in Afghanistan. He was the last American POW to remain unaccounted for as the U.S. prepares to wind down combat operations there next year and to withdraw all but a token military force by the end of 2016.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 26, 2013
Ralph K. "Ken" Barnes, a retired Koppers Co. manager who was a prisoner of war during the twilight months of World War II, died Saturday from complications of a stroke at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. The longtime Cockeysville resident was 89. The son of farmers, Ralph Kenneth Barnes was born in Gist, in Carroll County, and after his family lost their farm during the Depression, they moved to Waverly. He was a 1941 graduate of Polytechnic Institute, where he was an outstanding baseball pitcher, and later earned a degree from the Johns Hopkins University.
EXPLORE
September 17, 2012
The sheer number of Americans listed as missing in action - more than 73,000 in World War II, 7,900 in Korea, hundreds during the Cold War, nearly 2,000 in Vietnam, and even on today's modern battlefields - is difficult to grasp. Thus, it becomes a major importance when traditionally the third Friday of each September is set aside to honor those who have endured captivity as Prisoners of War or who have been or continue to be listed as Missing in Action. This year's National POW/MIA Recognition observance is September 21. We at the Veterans Administration's Maryland Health Care System want to take the time to say a special thank you to this group of veterans and pay special tribute to thousands of military families tormented by uncertainty due to the loss of loved ones whose whereabouts remain unknown.
NEWS
by Annie Linskey | August 1, 2012
The Montgomery County house delegation is set to convene Thursday night in Rockville to talk gambling -- the latest group to announce a huddle about the upcoming special session. Delegation chair Anne Kaiser said the group will talk strategy, though little seems settled within the group. "Everyone is still waiting to see what the governor wants," said Del. Anne Kaiser, who chairs the delegation. The 24-member Democratic group could be significant bloc of votes toward the 71 required for passage.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | June 2, 2012
Men, women and children of the Piscataway and other Mid-Atlantic Native American tribes danced and sang to the beat of heavy drums under a bright sun here Saturday, decked out in traditional headdresses, beadwork and stitching. They had much to celebrate, they said. The event was the Southern Maryland tribe's 30th annual Native American Festival and Pow Wow, but their first as a recognized, distinct people in the eyes of the state. That recognition of a centuries-old reality was only made official when Gov. Martin O'Malley issued an executive order recognizing the tribe's distinct history in January.
EXPLORE
June 2, 2012
I recently came across a local newspaper headline from May 18, 1945, noting, "German Prisoners For Farm Work. " The idea that Carroll County was the home of German prisoners of war during World War II was nothing new to me. I had heard many oral histories, tall tales and folklore passed down from previous generations about German POWs in Westminster during the war. The combination of our heritage of German settlers — mostly in the northern...
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau | June 17, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Nobody seemed to know what Boris N. Yeltsin was talking about when he said that American POWs from Vietnam were sent to the Soviet Union and that some may still be alive there.Both countries launched an intensified search of Soviet records yesterday after the Russian president made the allegation in an interview Monday.Amid the instant confusion, neither Mr. Yeltsin nor his spokesman was able to provide further details. U.S. officials pointed out that they had received a POW report only last week that did not mention any from Vietnam.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,Washington Bureau | August 12, 1992
WASHINGTON -- In his first public appearance since slipping out of the presidential race, Texas billionaire Ross Perot stalked back into the spotlight yesterday -- feisty, combative and obviously still bitter from his recent tangle with the world of politics.Testifying all day before the Senate Select Committee on POW/MIA Affairs, which is investigating the fate of U.S. prisoners held in Southeast Asia during the Vietnam War, Mr. Perot wasted no time before lambasting Washington for what he said was distorting his involvement with the POW issue since he declared his presidential aspirations last spring.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | March 8, 2011
Louis Sachwald, who spent 42 months as a prisoner of war during World War II after the fall of Bataan and Corregidor in the Philippines and managed to survive slave labor camps, enforced marches and "hell" ships, died Feb. 28 of dementia at the Charlotte Hall Veterans Home in Southern Maryland. The former Pikesville resident was 92. Mr. Sachwald was born in Brooklyn, N.Y., and moved in 1934 with his family to Lancaster, Pa. After graduating from McCaskey High School in 1937, he earned a bachelor's degree in education in 1940 from Millersville State Teachers College.
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