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By PETER H. LEWIS | November 15, 1993
The heavyweights of the personal-computer industry are prepared once again to slug it out in Las Vegas where the annual Comdex/Fall trade show opens today.The tone for this year's extravaganza was set earlier this month, when a man in a powered parachute sailed down into the Las Vegas boxing ring where Evander Holyfield and Riddick Bowe were fighting for the heavyweight title.If there is a similar disruption this week, it will be the arrival of the PowerPC chip. The chip is a new microprocessor forged by the alliance of IBM, Apple Computer and Motorola.
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BUSINESS
By DAVID ZEILER | October 11, 2007
When Apple releases Leopard this month (we hope), owners of older PowerPC-based Macs will have a tougher-than-usual decision to make. Unlike new versions of Microsoft's Windows operating system, which invariably require much more robust hardware to run acceptably than the previous version, every successive version of Mac OS X has actually run faster on existing hardware. Because of this, I have always advised Mac users to run the latest supported version of OS X on their Mac. But Leopard promises to be a cat of a different stripe.
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BUSINESS
By Newsday | March 8, 1994
It weighs about seven pounds and costs $12,000. Yet the notebook-sized computer that IBM unveiled yesterday is roughly as powerful as the first Cray Supercomputer, a million-dollar, Buick-sized monster that awed the world more than a decade ago.IBM is calling it the world's first "workstation" notebook, an allusion to the burly desktop machines typically used by scientists and engineers for heavy-duty computational tasks such as computer-aided design and...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Liisa May and Liisa May,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 24, 2001
What: Higher Score Deluxe 2002. For students planning to take the SAT, PSAT and ACT college entrance exams. This five-CD package from prep-test giant Kaplan Inc. offers not only test practice but also a study plan and an analysis of test-taking skills. Only two of the five CDs are devoted to preparation: the others are the "Newsweek Guide to Colleges"; how to succeed in school; and how to pay for higher education. The Encore Education test software is laid out well, with a clear-spoken human tour guide.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG BUSINESS NEWS | April 10, 1996
CUPERTINO, Calif. -- Apple Computer Inc. is expected to complete a licensing agreement with International Business Machines Corp., for the Macintosh operating system, analysts and a published report said yesterday.Apple and IBM are in the final stages of negotiations, which are expected to be concluded within several weeks, USA Today reported. The agreement will call for IBM's Microelectronics division to sell the Macintosh software to customers that buy IBM's PowerPC chip, the newspaper said.
BUSINESS
September 17, 1994
Japan voices hope for trade accordJapan expressed hope yesterday that a trade agreement would be reached with Washington before a U.S.-imposed deadline at the end of the month. An agreement is designed to open Japanese markets to American products in order to narrow the two countries' $60 billion trade gap. Washington has threatened Tokyo with sanctions unless an agreement is reached on government procurement by Sept. 30.IBM holds off on PowerPCIBM's personal computer division decided yesterday to delay selling machines based on the advanced PowerPC chip until next year because there is no software for them.
BUSINESS
By DAVID ZEILER | October 11, 2007
When Apple releases Leopard this month (we hope), owners of older PowerPC-based Macs will have a tougher-than-usual decision to make. Unlike new versions of Microsoft's Windows operating system, which invariably require much more robust hardware to run acceptably than the previous version, every successive version of Mac OS X has actually run faster on existing hardware. Because of this, I have always advised Mac users to run the latest supported version of OS X on their Mac. But Leopard promises to be a cat of a different stripe.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Liisa May and Liisa May,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 24, 2001
What: Higher Score Deluxe 2002. For students planning to take the SAT, PSAT and ACT college entrance exams. This five-CD package from prep-test giant Kaplan Inc. offers not only test practice but also a study plan and an analysis of test-taking skills. Only two of the five CDs are devoted to preparation: the others are the "Newsweek Guide to Colleges"; how to succeed in school; and how to pay for higher education. The Encore Education test software is laid out well, with a clear-spoken human tour guide.
BUSINESS
April 27, 1993
Motorola unveils powerful chipMotorola Inc. unveiled a powerful new computer chip to compete with industry leader Intel Corp.'s new Pentium microprocessor at less than half the price.The result could be a sharp price reduction for the next generation of personal computers, but analysts said Motorola's new PowerPC chip, announced yesterday, first must prove its appeal to software manufacturers.Slow world economic growth seenThe world economy will experience sluggish growth for the third straight year and could suffer a new slowdown if the major industrial nations fail to take stronger steps to bolster growth, the International Monetary Fund said yesterday in its new economic forecast.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG BUSINESS NEWS | May 7, 1996
CUPERTINO, Calif. -- Apple Computer Inc. yesterday licensed its Macintosh software to International Business Machines Corp., in an effort to spread its gospel to a wider audience.Apple kept its operating system to itself until 1994, when it began awarding licenses to a few clone makers. Most other personal computer makers' machines use software from Microsoft Corp. and chips from Intel Corp.The agreement doesn't go as far as some people would have liked. IBM itself won't make any Mac clones.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG BUSINESS NEWS | April 10, 1996
CUPERTINO, Calif. -- Apple Computer Inc. is expected to complete a licensing agreement with International Business Machines Corp., for the Macintosh operating system, analysts and a published report said yesterday.Apple and IBM are in the final stages of negotiations, which are expected to be concluded within several weeks, USA Today reported. The agreement will call for IBM's Microelectronics division to sell the Macintosh software to customers that buy IBM's PowerPC chip, the newspaper said.
BUSINESS
September 17, 1994
Japan voices hope for trade accordJapan expressed hope yesterday that a trade agreement would be reached with Washington before a U.S.-imposed deadline at the end of the month. An agreement is designed to open Japanese markets to American products in order to narrow the two countries' $60 billion trade gap. Washington has threatened Tokyo with sanctions unless an agreement is reached on government procurement by Sept. 30.IBM holds off on PowerPCIBM's personal computer division decided yesterday to delay selling machines based on the advanced PowerPC chip until next year because there is no software for them.
BUSINESS
By Newsday | March 8, 1994
It weighs about seven pounds and costs $12,000. Yet the notebook-sized computer that IBM unveiled yesterday is roughly as powerful as the first Cray Supercomputer, a million-dollar, Buick-sized monster that awed the world more than a decade ago.IBM is calling it the world's first "workstation" notebook, an allusion to the burly desktop machines typically used by scientists and engineers for heavy-duty computational tasks such as computer-aided design and...
BUSINESS
By PETER H. LEWIS | November 15, 1993
The heavyweights of the personal-computer industry are prepared once again to slug it out in Las Vegas where the annual Comdex/Fall trade show opens today.The tone for this year's extravaganza was set earlier this month, when a man in a powered parachute sailed down into the Las Vegas boxing ring where Evander Holyfield and Riddick Bowe were fighting for the heavyweight title.If there is a similar disruption this week, it will be the arrival of the PowerPC chip. The chip is a new microprocessor forged by the alliance of IBM, Apple Computer and Motorola.
BUSINESS
April 27, 1993
Motorola unveils powerful chipMotorola Inc. unveiled a powerful new computer chip to compete with industry leader Intel Corp.'s new Pentium microprocessor at less than half the price.The result could be a sharp price reduction for the next generation of personal computers, but analysts said Motorola's new PowerPC chip, announced yesterday, first must prove its appeal to software manufacturers.Slow world economic growth seenThe world economy will experience sluggish growth for the third straight year and could suffer a new slowdown if the major industrial nations fail to take stronger steps to bolster growth, the International Monetary Fund said yesterday in its new economic forecast.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dave Zeiler and Dave Zeiler,SUN STAFF | April 27, 1998
What's in a name? In the case of Apple's new G3 Power Macs, it's the core of an aggressive marketing strategy and - more crucially - optimism for the future of the Mac.G3 is the name of the CUcentral processing unit) that powers the latest generation of Macs. Intel's much-ballyhooed Pentium and Pentium II CPUs power most Windows-based PCs. Apple's recnet advertising campaign brags that the G3 chip fla-tout dusts the Pentium II.Both of Apple's ads in the current campaign belittle Intel's flagship product.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG BUSINESS NEWS | October 31, 1996
MONTEREY, Calif. -- Apple Computer Inc. said yesterday that it will introduce a Macintosh operating system in 1998 that will be able to run on any microprocessor.Chairman Gilbert Amelio, in a speech to analysts and investors, said the new operating system will run some older applications, but will have a new core of software code that enables it to run on chips from Intel Corp., Sun Microsystems Inc. and others -- as well as the Motorola Inc. processor used now.Apple's machines now run only on the PowerPC chip, a limitation that has hampered acceptance in a world increasingly dominated by machines featuring Intel chips and Microsoft Corp.
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