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By Cindy Harper-Evans | June 28, 1991
The debate over PowerMaster -- a high-alcohol malt liquor that critics claim is being promoted heavily among low-income, inner-city black males -- shows that some people feel that target marketing is wrong if a selected consumer group is perceived as poorly educated and the product is potentially harmful.However, target advertising is not new. In fact, research has shown that target marketing, no matter what the group, is a pretty smart way of focusing on potential consumers.The beer and advertising industries call the debate over PowerMaster preposterous.
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BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Staff Writer | May 13, 1992
First there was PowerMaster, a high-alcohol malt liquor roundly attacked for its name (implying that it was a strong intoxicant) and its alleged targeting of the black community.G. Heileman Brewing Co., the maker of PowerMaster, pulled it from the market in July after only a few weeks when the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms said the name ran afoul of a law prohibiting the promoting of a beer's strength on its label.Now, Heileman is back with a new malt liquor called Colt 45 Premium.
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BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Staff Writer | May 13, 1992
First there was PowerMaster, a high-alcohol malt liquor roundly attacked for its name (implying that it was a strong intoxicant) and its alleged targeting of blacks.G. Heileman Brewing Co., the maker of PowerMaster, pulled it from the market in July after only a few weeks when the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms said the name ran afoul of a law prohibiting the promoting of a beer's strength on its label.Now, Heileman is back with a new malt liquor called Colt 45 Premium. The problem is that it is in virtually the same style can as the old PowerMaster, and many of the same controversies are dogging the company.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Staff Writer | May 13, 1992
First there was PowerMaster, a high-alcohol malt liquor roundly attacked for its name (implying that it was a strong intoxicant) and its alleged targeting of blacks.G. Heileman Brewing Co., the maker of PowerMaster, pulled it from the market in July after only a few weeks when the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms said the name ran afoul of a law prohibiting the promoting of a beer's strength on its label.Now, Heileman is back with a new malt liquor called Colt 45 Premium. The problem is that it is in virtually the same style can as the old PowerMaster, and many of the same controversies are dogging the company.
NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,Evening Sun Staff John Fairhall contributed to this story | June 27, 1991
Many blacks are having trouble swallowing the marketing concept of PowerMaster, the new high-alcohol malt liquor that's targeting minorities.Taking a few minutes from his stroll through Mondawmin Mall yesterday afternoon, Al Watson, 48, said: "I think it's wrong. We have enough problems as it is now."The General Motors worker continued, "I think they're taking advantage of blacks. If you're going to market, then market it whole, not just for blacks."PowerMaster is made by G. Heileman Brewing Co. of Wisconsin, at its plant in Halethorpe that also makes Colt 45. The new malt liquor is scheduled for promotion in July.
NEWS
By John Fairhall and John Fairhall,Evening Sun Staff | June 27, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Federal authorities have begun a broad examination of malt liquor labeling and advertising in the wake of a controversy over G. Heileman Brewing Co.'s marketing of a new high-alcohol malt liquor in Baltimore and other cities.Federal Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms officials have asked Heileman to change the name of the product, PowerMaster, because they say it violates regulations prohibiting marketing appeals based on alcohol content.Heileman is based in Wisconsin and has a plant in Halethorpe, Baltimore County, which makes PowerMaster, according to a Heileman distributor.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Staff Writer | May 13, 1992
First there was PowerMaster, a high-alcohol malt liquor roundly attacked for its name (implying that it was a strong intoxicant) and its alleged targeting of the black community.G. Heileman Brewing Co., the maker of PowerMaster, pulled it from the market in July after only a few weeks when the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms said the name ran afoul of a law prohibiting the promoting of a beer's strength on its label.Now, Heileman is back with a new malt liquor called Colt 45 Premium.
BUSINESS
By Cindy Harper-Evans | June 26, 1991
PowerMaster, the new malt liquor whose high-alcohol content has brought complaints from black community leaders, is making its way to Baltimore-area liquor stores this week.The malt liquor, which is packaged in a black, 12-ounce can with silver and white letters and a sketch of a blazing red horse, has come under criticism from national and local black leaders because of its higher-than-average malt-alcohol content and its intended consumers -- lower-income inner-city blacks.PowerMaster, which sells for about $18 a case, or about $5 for a six-pack, contains 5.9 percent alcohol.
BUSINESS
By Cindy Harper-Evans | July 4, 1991
Financially strapped G. Heileman Brewing Co. said yesterday that it was scrapping plans to continue making and marketing PowerMaster because it is seeking to avoid a protracted legal battle over its new malt liquor's name.LaCrosse, Wis.-based Heileman, which filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection in January, said it will discontinue the product because of the "economic burden a legal contest would entail."The brewer has been told to change the name of PowerMaster, which has been brewed at the company's Halethorpe plant since its introduction last week, by the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms, which felt the name alluded to the malt liquor's high alcohol content -- 5.9 percent.
NEWS
June 27, 1991
The most insidious aspect of marketing alcohol and cigarettes is targeting such products at groups that are at particular risk of addiction. Last year R.J. Reynolds took what, until now, has been the most audacious step -- introducing two new cigarette brands designed to appeal to inner-city blacks and under-educated women. The outrage of health secretary Louis Sullivan, along with widespread negative publicity, forced Reynolds to scrap its plans. But now comes Maryland's own G. Heileman Brewing Co. with a high-alcohol malt beer that deserves the same fate.
NEWS
By DERRICK Z. JACKSON | December 31, 1991
Boston. -- The alcohol industry could not slip PowerMaster past African America. No problem. It captured Kwanzaa.PowerMaster was G. Heileman's high-alcohol malt liquor that was sold last summer in low-income African-American areas. Like Uptown cigarettes the year before, it was withdrawn after influential African Americans complained of blatant targeting. But those who brag about saving poor black folks from PowerMaster have let Miller beer make a mockery of black culture.In the October Black Enterprise magazine, there was a Miller ad for holiday cards.
NEWS
July 5, 1991
Are these ads directed at minorities?I am writing out of concern for the lack of objectivity in the lead paragraph of Alisa Samuels' June 27 article addressing the PowerMaster malt liquor advertisements.The story, which was laudable because it included remarks from a broad range of local individuals, asserts in its lead paragraph that PowerMaster's marketing tactics are addressed specifically to minorities. This is apparently the position of the federal Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms.
BUSINESS
By Cindy Harper-Evans | July 4, 1991
Financially strapped G. Heileman Brewing Co. said yesterday that it was scrapping plans to continue making and marketing PowerMaster because it is seeking to avoid a protracted legal battle over its new malt liquor's name.LaCrosse, Wis.-based Heileman, which filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection in January, said it will discontinue the product because of the "economic burden a legal contest would entail."The brewer has been told to change the name of PowerMaster, which has been brewed at the company's Halethorpe plant since its introduction last week, by the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms, which felt the name alluded to the malt liquor's high alcohol content -- 5.9 percent.
BUSINESS
By Cindy Harper-Evans | June 28, 1991
The debate over PowerMaster -- a high-alcohol malt liquor that critics claim is being promoted heavily among low-income, inner-city black males -- shows that some people feel that target marketing is wrong if a selected consumer group is perceived as poorly educated and the product is potentially harmful.However, target advertising is not new. In fact, research has shown that target marketing, no matter what the group, is a pretty smart way of focusing on potential consumers.The beer and advertising industries call the debate over PowerMaster preposterous.
NEWS
June 27, 1991
The most insidious aspect of marketing alcohol and cigarettes is targeting such products at groups that are at particular risk of addiction. Last year R.J. Reynolds took what, until now, has been the most audacious step -- introducing two new cigarette brands designed to appeal to inner-city blacks and under-educated women. The outrage of health secretary Louis Sullivan, along with widespread negative publicity, forced Reynolds to scrap its plans. But now comes Maryland's own G. Heileman Brewing Co. with a high-alcohol malt beer that deserves the same fate.
NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,Evening Sun Staff John Fairhall contributed to this story | June 27, 1991
Many blacks are having trouble swallowing the marketing concept of PowerMaster, the new high-alcohol malt liquor that's targeting minorities.Taking a few minutes from his stroll through Mondawmin Mall yesterday afternoon, Al Watson, 48, said: "I think it's wrong. We have enough problems as it is now."The General Motors worker continued, "I think they're taking advantage of blacks. If you're going to market, then market it whole, not just for blacks."PowerMaster is made by G. Heileman Brewing Co. of Wisconsin, at its plant in Halethorpe that also makes Colt 45. The new malt liquor is scheduled for promotion in July.
NEWS
July 5, 1991
Are these ads directed at minorities?I am writing out of concern for the lack of objectivity in the lead paragraph of Alisa Samuels' June 27 article addressing the PowerMaster malt liquor advertisements.The story, which was laudable because it included remarks from a broad range of local individuals, asserts in its lead paragraph that PowerMaster's marketing tactics are addressed specifically to minorities. This is apparently the position of the federal Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms.
NEWS
By DERRICK Z. JACKSON | December 31, 1991
Boston. -- The alcohol industry could not slip PowerMaster past African America. No problem. It captured Kwanzaa.PowerMaster was G. Heileman's high-alcohol malt liquor that was sold last summer in low-income African-American areas. Like Uptown cigarettes the year before, it was withdrawn after influential African Americans complained of blatant targeting. But those who brag about saving poor black folks from PowerMaster have let Miller beer make a mockery of black culture.In the October Black Enterprise magazine, there was a Miller ad for holiday cards.
NEWS
By John Fairhall and John Fairhall,Evening Sun Staff | June 27, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Federal authorities have begun a broad examination of malt liquor labeling and advertising in the wake of a controversy over G. Heileman Brewing Co.'s marketing of a new high-alcohol malt liquor in Baltimore and other cities.Federal Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms officials have asked Heileman to change the name of the product, PowerMaster, because they say it violates regulations prohibiting marketing appeals based on alcohol content.Heileman is based in Wisconsin and has a plant in Halethorpe, Baltimore County, which makes PowerMaster, according to a Heileman distributor.
BUSINESS
By Cindy Harper-Evans | June 26, 1991
PowerMaster, the new malt liquor whose high-alcohol content has brought complaints from black community leaders, is making its way to Baltimore-area liquor stores this week.The malt liquor, which is packaged in a black, 12-ounce can with silver and white letters and a sketch of a blazing red horse, has come under criticism from national and local black leaders because of its higher-than-average malt-alcohol content and its intended consumers -- lower-income inner-city blacks.PowerMaster, which sells for about $18 a case, or about $5 for a six-pack, contains 5.9 percent alcohol.
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