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By New York Times News Service | October 16, 1992
SAN FRANCISCO -- Apple Computer Inc. reported yesterday record revenues and earnings for its fourth quarter and the fiscal year, buoyed by sales of its Powerbook notebook computers.With more than $1 billion in sales for the year, the Powerbook is the most successful new personal computer since International Business Machines Corp.'s original PC.For its fourth quarter, which ended Sept. 25, Apple's earnings were $97.6 million, or 81 cents a share, up 20 percent from $81.2 million, or 67 cents a share in the comparable 1991 period.
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BUSINESS
By TERRIL YUE JONES and TERRIL YUE JONES,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 2, 2005
REDMOND, Wash. -- As Apple Computer Inc. enjoys rebounding popularity among computer users rejecting the dominance of Microsoft Corp., one of the biggest beneficiaries is - oddly enough - likely to be Microsoft. That's because outside of Apple itself, Microsoft sells more software for Apple's flagship Macintosh computers than any other company. With sales of Macintosh machines rising sharply, archrival Microsoft stands to bolster its well-established Office software and other programs for the Mac. "We're ecumenical people," Microsoft Chairman Bill Gates said.
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BUSINESS
By Peter H. Lewis | November 11, 1996
IN OLDEN DAYS, when Apple Computer Inc.'s graying senior executives were young and when cool technology was epitomized by hot-rod automobiles instead of computers, it was fashionable in some quarters to paint flames on the side of the car to indicate great speed.There are several reasons not to paint flames on Apple's new Powerbook 1400 portable Macintosh computer. First, it conjures up unpleasant memories of the ill-fated Powerbook 5300 series, which counted among its many quirks a propensity, though a rare one, for spontaneous combustion.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jon Fortt and Jon Fortt,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | October 23, 2003
Having Apple Computer's new Power Mac G5 around the office is like having a superhero assistant. If you've got lots of graphics or video heavy lifting to do all at once, it's amazing. If you're just moving documents around, there are less muscle-bound machines that are probably more in your price range. Apple sent me a juiced-up dual-processor 2-gigahertz G5 with AirPort and Bluetooth ($4,500 without monitor) last month. Yes, that machine is better than your average G5. But if you're going to get one, you might as well get one that screams.
BUSINESS
By PETER H. LEWIS | March 15, 1993
Apple Computer Inc. is selling PowerBook portable Macintosh computers at a rate of more than a million a year, which is a remarkable pace for a computer that is mostly incompatible with 90 percent of the other PCs in the world.As might be expected from those who march to the beat of a different drummer, people who tote PowerBooks seem to take a particular pride in fine-tuning their machines.One way to jazz up the PowerBook is to load it with the Norton Essentials for PowerBook, a $129 package produced by the Symantec Corp.
BUSINESS
By PETER H. LEWIS | May 25, 1992
On his most recent business flight, the traveler tucked several novels into his shirt pocket and, as a last-minute precaution against having the book go blank, tossed an extra battery into his flight bag.One does not usually associate extra battery life with reading novels, but in the case of the Voyager Co.'s Expanded Books -- books designed to be read on an Apple Computer Macintosh Powerbook screen instead of on paper -- battery life becomes important.It...
BUSINESS
January 25, 1993
Extending PowerBook battery lifeQ. I read in your column about a software program that extends the battery life of portable computers by turning off the screen and internal hard drive when not in use. Unfortunately for me, this was for IBM-compatible portables. I use an Apple PowerBook portable. Is there anything like that for my computer?A. The Norton Essentials For PowerBook ($129) from Symantec Corp. is a collection of utility programs designed for the PowerBook line of portables. Included in the collection are Battery Saver and Backlight Dimmer.
BUSINESS
By Mike Langberg and Mike Langberg,Knight-Ridder News Service | February 24, 1992
Living in the future sometimes requires a lot of patience.In a four-day stint last month, I read the novel "Jurassic Park" by Michael Crichton from beginning to end on an Apple PowerBook 100 laptop computer to test the new "expanded books" from Voyager Co.I read the book in exactly the way I do all my pleasure reading -- stretched out on the sofa, lying in bed and, occasionally, sneaking a moment at my desk in the newsroom when no editors were nearby.To...
BUSINESS
By PETER H. LEWIS | November 4, 1991
Compared with DOS-based notebook computers, the three new Apple Powerbook notebook computers introduced at the recent Comdex Fall trade show in Las Vegas might appear rather mundane.Makers of IBM PC-compatibles have been selling smaller, lighter, cheaper and more powerful notebooks for two years.That does not mean that Macintosh users will not buy Powerbooks as fast as Apple Computer Inc. can make them, of course. They are greatly superior to Apple's original Macintosh Portable, an expensive, heavy model, now discontinued.
BUSINESS
By Rory J. O'Connor and Rory J. O'Connor,Knight-Ridder News Service | February 17, 1992
SAN JOSE, Calif. -- Apple Computer Inc., aided by the NBA's all-time top scorer, is leading the notebook computer league in sales with its 4-month-old PowerBook.Retired Los Angeles Lakers superstar Kareem Abdul-Jabbar is the center of Apple's Olympic television ads promoting the PowerBook, whose rapid sales surprised many market watchers. The three PowerBook models, introduced last October, outsold all other notebook computers for the last quarter of 1991, according to some estimates.The PowerBooks towered over their U.S. competitors, selling more in three months than machines from Compaq or AST Research did in all of 1991.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Williams and Stephen Williams,NEWSDAY | June 25, 2001
Borderline hysteria was in the air at the massive Apple booth at San Franciso's MacWorld in January when the titanium PowerBook was introduced. Steve Jobs, he of all things silicon and digital, had aimed to jump-start his struggling company; the new PowerBook G4 was hailed as the resurrection, the renaissance and real cool, too. Your faithful correspondent waited in lines 10 deep to get his hands on one of the G4 laptops, but, as with most things, it...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dave Zeiler and Dave Zeiler,SUN STAFF | February 19, 2001
Sex and power. It's an irresistible combination, and Apple CEO Steve Jobs knows it. When Jobs introduced the PowerBook G4 at January's MacWorld Expo in San Francisco, he said Apple's goal was to combine the sex appeal of the Sony Vaio (a Windows-based notebook computer) with the power of a Mac desktop computer. Although Jobs tends to exaggerate at these semi-annual extravaganzas, the newest PowerBook is the real thing. Here we have a laptop Mac powered by a 400 or 500 MHz G4 chip, featuring a 15.2-inch-wide screen, a DVD-ROM drive, 128 megabytes of memory and an advertised battery life of five hours - all encased in an inch-thick, 5.3-pound titanium shell.
BUSINESS
By Stephen Manes and Stephen Manes,New York Times News Service | September 8, 1997
MEMBERS OF the so-called Macintosh community get extremely touchy when anyone so much as hints that the Mac might not be the coolest, most elegant electronic device in the known universe.Macintosh engenders a sort of fanaticism unknown among the competition; no one ever refers to a "Windows community." But then, Windows users, who constitute the vast majority, tend not to think of themselves as members of some elite group.Macintosh computers still offer several advantages over their Windows counterparts.
BUSINESS
By Peter H. Lewis | November 11, 1996
IN OLDEN DAYS, when Apple Computer Inc.'s graying senior executives were young and when cool technology was epitomized by hot-rod automobiles instead of computers, it was fashionable in some quarters to paint flames on the side of the car to indicate great speed.There are several reasons not to paint flames on Apple's new Powerbook 1400 portable Macintosh computer. First, it conjures up unpleasant memories of the ill-fated Powerbook 5300 series, which counted among its many quirks a propensity, though a rare one, for spontaneous combustion.
BUSINESS
By PETER H. LEWIS | March 15, 1993
Apple Computer Inc. is selling PowerBook portable Macintosh computers at a rate of more than a million a year, which is a remarkable pace for a computer that is mostly incompatible with 90 percent of the other PCs in the world.As might be expected from those who march to the beat of a different drummer, people who tote PowerBooks seem to take a particular pride in fine-tuning their machines.One way to jazz up the PowerBook is to load it with the Norton Essentials for PowerBook, a $129 package produced by the Symantec Corp.
BUSINESS
January 25, 1993
Extending PowerBook battery lifeQ. I read in your column about a software program that extends the battery life of portable computers by turning off the screen and internal hard drive when not in use. Unfortunately for me, this was for IBM-compatible portables. I use an Apple PowerBook portable. Is there anything like that for my computer?A. The Norton Essentials For PowerBook ($129) from Symantec Corp. is a collection of utility programs designed for the PowerBook line of portables. Included in the collection are Battery Saver and Backlight Dimmer.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jon Fortt and Jon Fortt,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | October 23, 2003
Having Apple Computer's new Power Mac G5 around the office is like having a superhero assistant. If you've got lots of graphics or video heavy lifting to do all at once, it's amazing. If you're just moving documents around, there are less muscle-bound machines that are probably more in your price range. Apple sent me a juiced-up dual-processor 2-gigahertz G5 with AirPort and Bluetooth ($4,500 without monitor) last month. Yes, that machine is better than your average G5. But if you're going to get one, you might as well get one that screams.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Williams and Stephen Williams,NEWSDAY | June 25, 2001
Borderline hysteria was in the air at the massive Apple booth at San Franciso's MacWorld in January when the titanium PowerBook was introduced. Steve Jobs, he of all things silicon and digital, had aimed to jump-start his struggling company; the new PowerBook G4 was hailed as the resurrection, the renaissance and real cool, too. Your faithful correspondent waited in lines 10 deep to get his hands on one of the G4 laptops, but, as with most things, it...
BUSINESS
December 7, 1992
Prospects for computer deals, advances look goodU.S. computer firms boosting sales in JapanTOKYO -- Fewer Japanese use personal computers than do Americans, but that seems to be changing.Japanese consumers buy only 2 million personal computers a year. That's 20 percent of U.S. annual sales, despite an economy that's 60 percent as large.One reason is the high cost. But computer companies -- led by Compaq, which unveiled a low-priced computer in October -- are beginning to bring prices down.
BUSINESS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | November 2, 1992
Apple's new PowerBook portable Macintoshes are case studies of computer mechanics and design.For years there weren't any portable Macs from Apple. Then came the PowerBooks in 1991. The Model 100 was made by Sony and was expected to attract students. It died on the market, too feeble for most users, lacking even a floppy drive. The Model 140 had a fine keyboard, good speed and a built-in trackball. But the 140's screen wasn't as bright and readable as the faster 170. Unfortunately, the 170 cost a pile.
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