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By Peter Baker | September 30, 1990
The United States Sailboat Show comes to Annapolis at the end of the week, and the United States Powerboat Show takes over that city's municipal docks and harbor the following weekend.Both shows are opportunities for powerboaters and sailors to see what is new and innovative in the marine industry -- from high-tech sportsfishermen and lavish cruising yachts to the latest in small-boat radar.The shows, billed as the largest in-water shows in the world, come at a time when the boating market is weak.
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By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2013
Over the next two weekends in Annapolis, more than 100,000 people will descend on City Dock for annual fall shows showcasing powerboats and sailboats. The shows are a staple in the downtown area, but this year's editions mark a changing of the guard. As recently as this summer, the future of the boat shows was in doubt, as longtime show owner Ed Hartman and Mayor Josh Cohen battled over potential rezoning for a key part of the City Dock waterfront that's used by the shows. Hartman eventually struck a deal to sell the shows to a group of investors, and Cohen - while still pursuing his rezoning plan - pledged to work with the new owners to keep the popular attractions sailing along.
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SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,Sun Staff Correspondent | October 17, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- Hours after the sailing yachts depart the city docks after the sailboat show, the motor-driven yachts begin to arrive for the United States Powerboat Show, which will occupy the downtown waterfront tomorrow through Sunday.This year's edition of the show that started as an offshoot of the United States Sailboat Show includes an interesting lineup of boats from to an 18-foot canoe powered by an electric motor to 72-foot motor yachts.One of the smaller boats in the show, the Whisper, built by Electra-Ghost Canoes in Annapolis, is designed for use in backwaters and rivers.
NEWS
By Yeganeh June Torbati, The Baltimore Su | October 2, 2010
As doors open Thursday for the four-day U.S. Sailboat Show in Annapolis, organizers hope that the city — and the boating industry — can emerge from the storms that battered the city last week and the economic tempest that took its toll on one of the city's major industries. After a recession that has forced many avid boaters to opt for boat repairs in lieu of buying a new model, vendors are looking to the sailboat show and its sister powerboat show, both to be held over the next two weeks, to help boaters and vendors bounce back.
NEWS
By Capt. Bob Spore | October 13, 1991
Tomorrow is the last day of the 1991 U.S. Sailboat Show. At 6 p.m. whistles will blow, and the transformation will begin that will turn the U.S. Sailboat Show into the U.S. Powerboat Show in just two days. If you say it can't be done, just watch.Hundreds of boats will bemoved out, and hundreds of boats moved in and secured by Tuesday afternoon. Some of the 350 on-shore exhibitors work both shows, but manydon't, so those exhibits must be packed up and shipped out while others are waiting to get in and set up.Most people don't realize it, but miles and miles of power and phone cable must be run on the miles of floating docks to the boats.
NEWS
By Capt. Bob Spore | October 20, 1991
Today is the last day of the 1991 U.S. Powerboat Show, which startedin 1972 as a little sister to the U.S. Sailboat Show. The show is entering its third decade and has become one of the largest in-water boat shows in the world.It is no secret that the boating industry has been dragging lately, but signs of new life are evident. The U.S. Sailboat Show, which preceded the powerboat show, registered good sales in both boats and accessories.The U.S. Powerboat Show is a bit smaller than in record years, but you still can find plenty of the 20- to 80-foot yachts in the waterand more than 250 craft on display ashore.
NEWS
By Amanda J. Crawford and Amanda J. Crawford,SUN STAFF | October 13, 2000
For two days, Annapolis has enjoyed the eye of the hurricane, a breather between the frenzy of two boat shows that every year transform this historic town into a mecca for all things - and people - nautical. That relative calm, reminiscent of pre-boat show days when tables were available in restaurants on Main Street and a parking place could be found downtown, ends today as the 29th annual United States Powerboat Show opens for general admission at City Dock. Billed as the nation's oldest in-water powerboat show and featuring more than 450 boats, the show is expected to draw about as many visitors as the sailboat show last weekend, almost 50,000.
NEWS
By Amanda J. Crawford and Amanda J. Crawford,SUN STAFF | October 12, 2001
The 30th annual United States Powerboat Show will motor into Annapolis Harbor this week with hundreds more - and pricier - boats than hailed to the capital city last weekend for its cousin, the United States Sailboat show, the favorite in this sailing community. With about 470 boats in water, a couple of hundred smaller boats on shore, and about 400 vendors with equipment, services and products, the powerboat show is revved up to draw about as many visitors as the sailboat show, which organizers estimated at 50,000 people.
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,Staff Writer | October 16, 1992
For most people, the 45-foot Bayliner with the airy salon, fully stocked galley with microwave and master stateroom with its own stereo system, tub and shower on display near City Dock in Annapolis yesterday is just a fantasy.But the yacht, one of hundreds tied up for the 21st annual U.S. Powerboat Show, had fulfilled someone's dream. Next to its $315,495 price tag was a large "Sold" sign.And by the end of the day yesterday Tidewater Yacht Sales Inc. had sold another.John R. Atherton, president of Tidewater, a Portsmouth, Va., dealer of Bayliner and boats priced from $120,000 to $320,000, wasn't surprised, despite the lingering recession.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,Sun reporter | October 7, 2007
With the unofficial end of tourist season next week, the city of Annapolis will close Susan B. Campbell Park and much of City Dock for six months to reinforce its rotting underwater retaining wall. The $8.8 million project, scheduled to take place between the closing of the U.S. Powerboat Show on Oct. 14 and the Maritime Heritage Festival in May, includes replacing about 1,000 feet of bulkhead with steel, landscaping the park and installing a new boardwalk and about 20 new boat slips. City officials expect the dock and surrounding area to be closed from Oct. 17 to April 15 while crews on two barges drive in 97 steel pilings to shore up sinking wooden bulkheads as far as 80 feet below the water's surface.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer and Susan Reimer,susan.reimer@baltsun.com | October 19, 2009
ANNAPOLIS - -To borrow a phrase from the world of politics, "It's the weather, stupid." Merchants at the 38th annual United States Powerboat Show had fewer customers during its rainy weekend stand in this city's harbor. But those who turned out were serious about buying and did little complaining about the economy, the merchants said. "I've been at this show every year since it started in 1972, and we've never had four straight days of rain," said Woody Jackson of Jackson Marine Sales in Baltimore and North East.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,Sun reporter | October 7, 2007
With the unofficial end of tourist season next week, the city of Annapolis will close Susan B. Campbell Park and much of City Dock for six months to reinforce its rotting underwater retaining wall. The $8.8 million project, scheduled to take place between the closing of the U.S. Powerboat Show on Oct. 14 and the Maritime Heritage Festival in May, includes replacing about 1,000 feet of bulkhead with steel, landscaping the park and installing a new boardwalk and about 20 new boat slips. City officials expect the dock and surrounding area to be closed from Oct. 17 to April 15 while crews on two barges drive in 97 steel pilings to shore up sinking wooden bulkheads as far as 80 feet below the water's surface.
NEWS
By SUSAN GVOZDAS | October 1, 2006
At a show known nationally for exhibiting the latest, fastest and most luxurious sailboats hitting the market, a vessel that can skim the surface on two toothpick-like, fiberglass extensions may sound more fitting for a sci-fi movie. The International Moth, a modified version of the popular Australian boat, will make its American debut at the 37th annual U.S. Sailboat Show in Annapolis. The show will run from Thursday to Oct. 9 in Annapolis Harbor, and the 35th annual U.S. Powerboat Show follows: Oct. 12 to 15. Australian Rohan Veal, a champion Moth sailor, will promote the boat.
SPORTS
By Doug Beizer and Doug Beizer,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 12, 2003
When Hurricane Isabel slammed into the East Coast last month, organizers of the U.S. sailboat and powerboat shows feared the Annapolis event could be in jeopardy. Despite significant destruction in parts of Annapolis, the city and the boat shows are ready for visitors, said Kathy Wood, president of the shows. "We prepared for the storm, and had no loss of equipment or damage," said Rick Franke, a spokesman for the shows. The show's 240 floating docks and 50 temporary pilings were kept safe on high ground and are now set up in their temporary home in Annapolis harbor.
SPORTS
By Doug Beizer and Doug Beizer,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 12, 2003
Standing in the cockpit of his sailboat with cold rain and wind hitting his face, Vic McCloskey remembers the instant he got the idea to switch to powerboating. "I'm in the rain feeling miserable and a trawler passes me," McCloskey remembered. "The captain is in the pilot house, wearing short sleeves and drinking a cup of coffee. I thought to myself, these guys know something we don't know." So after more than 40 years of sailing, McCloskey purchased a powerboat, a trawler. And McCloskey is not alone, said Rick Franke, a spokesman for the U.S. Sailboat Show.
NEWS
By Jason Song and Julie Bykowicz and Jason Song and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | October 10, 2003
Annapolis' historic Market House opened its doors yesterday for the first time since last month's Tropical Storm Isabel set the food shanty's cheese and ice cream afloat in a 7-foot slush of Severn River surge. "I don't know who's more excited about our opening, our customers or us," said an ebullient Judy Schwartzberg, co-owner of The Big Cheese and Sammy's Downtown Deli. Yesterday, the first day of this weekend's popular sailboat show, was the city's self-imposed deadline for drying out after Isabel's surge left much of the City Dock area - including a life-size bronze statue of author Alex Haley - temporarily underwater.
SPORTS
By Doug Beizer and Doug Beizer,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 12, 2003
When Hurricane Isabel slammed into the East Coast last month, organizers of the U.S. sailboat and powerboat shows feared the Annapolis event could be in jeopardy. Despite significant destruction in parts of Annapolis, the city and the boat shows are ready for visitors, said Kathy Wood, president of the shows. "We prepared for the storm, and had no loss of equipment or damage," said Rick Franke, a spokesman for the shows. The show's 240 floating docks and 50 temporary pilings were kept safe on high ground and are now set up in their temporary home in Annapolis harbor.
NEWS
By Jamal E. Watson and Jamal E. Watson,SUN STAFF | October 18, 1998
For thousands of people who descended on Annapolis yesterday, it was "the boat show."But Tom Broadwick, a retired lawyer from Tallahassee, Fla., had another description for the 27th annual United States Powerboat Show: "This is our convention.""We've been coming for the last 20 years," said Broadwick, 53, a weekend sailor -- except for this week, when he drove 21 hours with his wife to take in the 600 exhibits at the Annapolis City Dock and harbor. "This is the best show I've seen in years.
SPORTS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 13, 2002
Hatteras Yachts is bringing out a brand new 54-footer, and Hunter Marine has a 42-footer to debut at the boat shows in Annapolis this year. J-Boats is rolling out a new cruiser and Endeavor has a new power catamaran. In fact, some 48 manufacturers are debuting more than 50 new boats at the U.S. sailboat and powerboat shows this weekend and next, and nearly 100 shore-side dealers are exhibiting scads of new water purifiers, boat toilets, dry bags and motion sickness cures. There's even a sister-act apparel company that timed the launch of a new line of slickers for the boat shows.
NEWS
By Amanda J. Crawford and Amanda J. Crawford,SUN STAFF | October 11, 2002
Amid the sailors decked out in foul-weather gear, the hundreds of gleaming sloops and catamarans and row after row of maritime accessories at this weekend's U.S. Sailboat Show, Bob Maersch is peddling a simple service. For $100, he can take a faded, scraped-up winch and turn it into a gleaming piece of nautical hardware. He'll do the same for your turnbuckles, your chocks, your cleats and any other sailboat equipment or metallic keepsake. A former electrical engineer, Maersch and his wife, Rita, both 61, bought Annapolis Plating and Polishing on Hudson Street in Annapolis four years ago, becoming part of the diverse and thriving maritime industry in the state capital.
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