Advertisement
HomeCollectionsPower Vacuum
IN THE NEWS

Power Vacuum

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
January 26, 1997
WHILE THE communist-led lower house of the Russian parliament was debating a resolution calling for President Boris N. Yeltsin's ouster, one of his chief rivals was in New York hobnobbing on Wall Street. It was clear Alexander I. Lebed, a retired paratroop general and one-time Kremlin security adviser, was campaigning -- perhaps in the wrong place.Even if President Yeltsin, after heart surgery and pneumonia, is able to resume his full duties, the betting in Moscow these days is that he is out. Political kingpins from Yeltsin insiders to communists are trying to make sure that the hugely popular but unpredictable Mr. Lebed will not have any chance to be elected president.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 19, 2011
The death of North Korean leader Kim Jong Il leaves a cloud of uncertainty over North Asia and complicates efforts by the U.S. and its allies to halt the nuclear weapons program that is the principal legacy of his 17-year rule. Kim was a canny and manipulative despot who repeatedly thwarted efforts by more powerful neighbors and adversaries like the United States to stabilize the Korean peninsula. Now that he is gone, the internal power struggle over succession could have unpredictable and perhaps dangerous consequences for the region and the world.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Alexandra Zavis and Alexandra Zavis,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 19, 2007
CAMP SPARROWHAWK, Iraq -- With the flourish of a pen and a businesslike handshake, the British turned over yesterday a lawless stretch of desert and marshland to Iraqi provincial control. Maysan was the fourth of Iraq's 18 provinces to be handed over and the third transferred by British-led troops. Britain has started reducing its forces in the four southern provinces even as the U.S. increases troop strength in Baghdad and elsewhere. British officers say they are responding to a different set of problems from their American counterparts.
NEWS
By Alexandra Zavis and Alexandra Zavis,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 19, 2007
CAMP SPARROWHAWK, Iraq -- With the flourish of a pen and a businesslike handshake, the British turned over yesterday a lawless stretch of desert and marshland to Iraqi provincial control. Maysan was the fourth of Iraq's 18 provinces to be handed over and the third transferred by British-led troops. Britain has started reducing its forces in the four southern provinces even as the U.S. increases troop strength in Baghdad and elsewhere. British officers say they are responding to a different set of problems from their American counterparts.
NEWS
January 17, 2007
Time to let Iraqis clean up the mess Let's step back from our subjective view of Iraq and try to look at this situation objectively ("Staying the course," Jan. 11). Our invasion of Iraq and ousting of its dictator have left a serious power vacuum there. And our continued occupation of Iraq is delaying the filling of this vacuum. Whether we like it or not, Iraq is in the midst of a civil war, whose outcome will decide who will control Iraq - or each of its three areas, if Iraq splits on Shiite, Sunni and Kurd lines, which is a serious possibility.
NEWS
By Trudy Rubin | August 16, 2005
PHILADELPHIA - Cindy Sheehan is right to be furious. Camped out in Crawford, Texas, with several other mothers who lost sons in Iraq, Ms. Sheehan wants to meet President Bush. She says: "Our sons made the ultimate sacrifice, and we want answers." I understand why Mr. Bush doesn't want to meet Ms. Sheehan. She wants him to pull U.S. troops out of Iraq. But he can't pull the troops out. He can't even make the substantial reductions that some of his top brass are predicting for early next year.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Bill Glauber and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Bill Glauber,Sun Staff Correspondents | October 8, 1994
PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti -- The Haitian Parliament formally authorized President Jean-Bertrand Aristide yesterday to grant amnesty to the coup plotters who overthrew him, essentially leaving him to decide the details."
NEWS
December 19, 2011
The death of North Korean leader Kim Jong Il leaves a cloud of uncertainty over North Asia and complicates efforts by the U.S. and its allies to halt the nuclear weapons program that is the principal legacy of his 17-year rule. Kim was a canny and manipulative despot who repeatedly thwarted efforts by more powerful neighbors and adversaries like the United States to stabilize the Korean peninsula. Now that he is gone, the internal power struggle over succession could have unpredictable and perhaps dangerous consequences for the region and the world.
NEWS
May 24, 1993
After four months in office, President Clinton still hasn't gotten around to appointing a chairman for the embattled National Endowment of the Arts, which is still trying to recover from the pummeling it took from conservative senators last year over its funding of controversial images by Robert Mapplethorpe and Andres Serrano. The delay in naming an NEA chairman is causing some in the arts community to question the administration's commitment to upholding the principle of free expression.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 16, 2001
POL-E CHARKHI, Afghanistan - In a 10-minute span yesterday afternoon, three different cars arrived here from towns ruled by three different Afghan warlords. The first car arrived from Jalalabad, where a local political leader named Mawlawi Yunis Khalis has declared himself ruler, rejecting the Northern Alliance and the Taliban's authority. The second came from the nearby city of Towr Kham, where a local commander named Hazrati Ali has seized power. The third arrived from Sorubi, where Ezatullah, a local commander with only one name, has created his own fief.
NEWS
January 17, 2007
Time to let Iraqis clean up the mess Let's step back from our subjective view of Iraq and try to look at this situation objectively ("Staying the course," Jan. 11). Our invasion of Iraq and ousting of its dictator have left a serious power vacuum there. And our continued occupation of Iraq is delaying the filling of this vacuum. Whether we like it or not, Iraq is in the midst of a civil war, whose outcome will decide who will control Iraq - or each of its three areas, if Iraq splits on Shiite, Sunni and Kurd lines, which is a serious possibility.
NEWS
By Trudy Rubin | August 16, 2005
PHILADELPHIA - Cindy Sheehan is right to be furious. Camped out in Crawford, Texas, with several other mothers who lost sons in Iraq, Ms. Sheehan wants to meet President Bush. She says: "Our sons made the ultimate sacrifice, and we want answers." I understand why Mr. Bush doesn't want to meet Ms. Sheehan. She wants him to pull U.S. troops out of Iraq. But he can't pull the troops out. He can't even make the substantial reductions that some of his top brass are predicting for early next year.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 21, 2003
BAGHDAD, Iraq - The movie is old and is from Turkey, and it is about a rich boy who meets a poor girl and falls in love. It is called A Special Date, and in two brief scenes, the girl appears topless. Faded posters in the lobby of the Stars Cinema on Sadoun Street entice customers with snapshots of the racy images. Each poster bears a small triangular stamp dated 1999 from the regime of Saddam Hussein: "Approved for show by the Ministry of Information." A prominent Muslim leader now says the approval was a terrible mistake that must be reversed.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 26, 2003
BAGHDAD, Iraq - A religious edict issued in Iran and distributed to Shiite mullahs in Iraq calls on them "to seize the first possible opportunity to fill the power vacuum in the administration of Iraqi cities." The fatwa, issued April 8 by Kadhem al-Husseini al-Haeri, an Iraqi-born cleric based in the Iranian holy city of Qom, suggests that Shiite clerics in Iraq are receiving significant direction from Iran as they attempt to assert the power of Iraq's long oppressed religious majority.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 25, 2003
WASHINGTON - With some Baghdad neighborhoods still not safe and huge throngs of Shiite Muslims calling for U.S. forces to leave, a rising chorus of critics say the Bush administration misjudged the potential for a dangerous power vacuum in Iraq. Moreover, critics say the administration failed to deploy enough troops and the right mix of forces to provide security in Iraq and restore basic services, allowing anti-democratic forces in the country to emerge and meet those critical needs. "There are not sufficient troops," said Rep. Jim Kolbe, an Arizona Republican, who was in Kuwait last week meeting with U.S. Agency for International Development officials and humanitarian groups.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 16, 2001
POL-E CHARKHI, Afghanistan - In a 10-minute span yesterday afternoon, three different cars arrived here from towns ruled by three different Afghan warlords. The first car arrived from Jalalabad, where a local political leader named Mawlawi Yunis Khalis has declared himself ruler, rejecting the Northern Alliance and the Taliban's authority. The second came from the nearby city of Towr Kham, where a local commander named Hazrati Ali has seized power. The third arrived from Sorubi, where Ezatullah, a local commander with only one name, has created his own fief.
NEWS
November 4, 1995
THROUGHOUT ITS history, Russia has required strong leaders because any weakness at the center of power has usually led to disorder or confusion. This is the situation today. With Boris N. Yeltsin, the country's first post-communistpresident, gravely ill, Moscow is a hotbed of rumors and conspiracy theories.Russians have a tendency to overdramatize and they often assume the worst. This can be seen in their appraisal of things that have happened in his absence. Like the disqualification of the reformist Yabloko party from next month's parliamentary election on a mere legal technicality.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 21, 2003
BAGHDAD, Iraq - The movie is old and is from Turkey, and it is about a rich boy who meets a poor girl and falls in love. It is called A Special Date, and in two brief scenes, the girl appears topless. Faded posters in the lobby of the Stars Cinema on Sadoun Street entice customers with snapshots of the racy images. Each poster bears a small triangular stamp dated 1999 from the regime of Saddam Hussein: "Approved for show by the Ministry of Information." A prominent Muslim leader now says the approval was a terrible mistake that must be reversed.
NEWS
January 26, 1997
WHILE THE communist-led lower house of the Russian parliament was debating a resolution calling for President Boris N. Yeltsin's ouster, one of his chief rivals was in New York hobnobbing on Wall Street. It was clear Alexander I. Lebed, a retired paratroop general and one-time Kremlin security adviser, was campaigning -- perhaps in the wrong place.Even if President Yeltsin, after heart surgery and pneumonia, is able to resume his full duties, the betting in Moscow these days is that he is out. Political kingpins from Yeltsin insiders to communists are trying to make sure that the hugely popular but unpredictable Mr. Lebed will not have any chance to be elected president.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 14, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Greece is the birthplace of democracy, tragedy and comedy, and all three are elements in the political struggle now under way to replace the country's ailing prime minister, Andreas Papandreou.Hospitalized with failing lungs and kidneys nearly a month ago, Mr. Papandreou, 76, remains critically ill and with little hope of resuming his duties. But his hold on his party and, in a sense, on the country remains so strong that no one has made a decisive move to oust him; the inevitable transition to new leadership has stalled.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.