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ENTERTAINMENT
By James Coates and James Coates,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | June 17, 2004
I need help recovering some important data that I stored on my computer but didn't back up before disaster struck. Specifically, I have a Gateway all-in-one computer in which the monitor screen and the CPU are built into the same case to save desktop space. But the power supply stopped working, and I cannot get the computer to turn on. The lights flash for a second and nothing else happens. My repair shop said that there are burned-out contacts inside the case and that I would need to find special parts.
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NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | December 19, 2013
Passengers at Baltimore's Penn Station and about 10,000 folks in Harford County lost electricity in two separate outages Thursday, said Rachael Lighty, a Baltimore Gas & Electric spokeswoman. The lights went out at Penn Station around 4:30 p.m. and came back on a little over an hour later. The tracks weren't affected, and MARC and Amtrak officials said neither service saw delays because of it. Lighty said an issue with an underground power cable to the building caused the outage.
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BUSINESS
By Mike Himowitz | March 17, 2005
WE LIVE in a world of PC noise pollution, but I'd never realized how bad it was until I bought my last computer. Like most of us, I'd assumed that all PCs hummed and whined - the price we pay for the fans that keep all those hot new chips from frying. But this computer - a Compaq Presario - was different. True, when I turned it on, it hummed and whined like every other PC, but after two minutes it settled down to well, something close to silence. At first I thought the machine was broken, so I put my ear to the case, and sure enough, there was a very soft hum. But from a foot away, it was virtually inaudible.
NEWS
By Laura Smitherman | laura.smitherman@baltsun.com | December 19, 2009
Gov. Martin O'Malley has asked the state's top energy regulators to order that new power be supplied in Maryland at cost-controlled prices in an attempt to bring down electricity rates. While urging the Public Service Commission to take that step, O'Malley also indicated he might abandon his effort to impose broader re-regulation of the energy industry through legislation. That proposal failed in the last General Assembly session, and the governor vowed to bring the bill back, but he doesn't appear to have the necessary support.
BUSINESS
By BILL HUSTED and BILL HUSTED,THE ATLANTA JOURNAL-CONSTITUTION | October 18, 2007
Lately my monitor has been flickering between light and dark and also humming. I don't suppose this is good news. Anything I can do, or is it time for a new one? - Judith Baird I think the power supply inside the monitor is going bad. If so, there's a very slight fire risk. But it's far more likely that the power supply will just stop working without flame and smoke. Replacing a monitor power supply is not a do-it-yourself job. There are dangerous currents inside the case, even when the monitor is unplugged (capacitors store power very much like a battery)
BUSINESS
By BILL HUSTED and BILL HUSTED,The Atlanta Journal-Constitution | March 13, 2008
I've been following your advice about HDTV and am almost ready to make the leap and buy a new set. I'd like to hang it on the wall in my living room. Is that the sort of job I could do for myself? - Eric Ulbricht It depends on your skills, but it's sure not as simple has hanging a picture. So let me go over some of the issues involved and you can decide if it's a DIY job. First, keep in mind that a flat screen is rather delicate. Flexing the set as you manhandle it onto the wall is not a good idea.
BUSINESS
By BILL HUSTED and BILL HUSTED,The Atlanta Journal-Constitution | November 22, 2007
I am planning on buying a new computer but want to know how I transfer everything from the old computer to the new computer. This would include programs such as Norton Anti-Virus and Microsoft Word as well as pictures and other things I have stored on my old computer. How is this done and is it difficult to do? - R. Stricker Instead of transferring your programs, you'll need to install them on the new computer using the original installation CDs. While I have seen software that promises to move programs from one computer to another, I strongly recommend that you simply install the programs.
BUSINESS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,Sun reporter | October 3, 2007
State utility regulators begin debate today on proposals to scrap the way Maryland utilities buy electricity in favor of a more flexible system that some argue will eliminate price shocks like the one that hit consumers this past summer. The Public Service Commission hearings are the latest phase in a multipronged review of the state's deregulation laws that consumer advocates hope will lead to lower electricity prices. Gov. Martin O'Malley and lawmakers ordered the studies in response to outrage over a more than 70 percent rate increase for customers of Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. over the past two years.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | December 19, 2013
Passengers at Baltimore's Penn Station and about 10,000 folks in Harford County lost electricity in two separate outages Thursday, said Rachael Lighty, a Baltimore Gas & Electric spokeswoman. The lights went out at Penn Station around 4:30 p.m. and came back on a little over an hour later. The tracks weren't affected, and MARC and Amtrak officials said neither service saw delays because of it. Lighty said an issue with an underground power cable to the building caused the outage.
BUSINESS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | July 16, 2000
Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. has the unwanted distinction of becoming the first utility in the nation to have power deregulation halted by a court illustrating how the move to give consumers cheaper electricity rates through competition has become complicated and fiercely contested. BGE and the Mid-Atlantic Power Supply Association are just days away from going to battle for yet another time in a courtroom. The state Court of Appeals hearing Thursday is expected to be critical in determining the immediate future of deregulation in Baltimore and its five surrounding counties.
NEWS
By Laura Smitherman and Laura Smitherman,laura.smitherman@baltsun.com | December 19, 2009
Gov. Martin O'Malley has asked the state's top energy regulators to order that new power be supplied in Maryland at cost-controlled prices in an attempt to bring down electricity rates. While urging the Public Service Commission to take that step, O'Malley also indicated he might abandon his effort to impose broader re-regulation of the energy industry through legislation. That proposal failed in the last General Assembly session, and the governor vowed to bring the bill back, but he doesn't appear to have the necessary support.
BUSINESS
By BILL HUSTED and BILL HUSTED,THE ATLANTA JOURNAL-CONSTITUTION | April 24, 2008
I am using a UPS (uninterruptable power supply) with my plasma TV. I believe that's what you recommended in an earlier column. However, a friend says that I don't need to use the UPS. What's the deal? - James Allen My recommendation is that a UPS is darn near a necessity for HDTVs that use a projection bulb (rear projection or the type that project the image to a screen). Otherwise, if power goes out, the fan that cools the bulb after shutdown won't work and you stand a really good chance of ruining a bulb that costs between $200 and $500.
BUSINESS
By BILL HUSTED and BILL HUSTED,The Atlanta Journal-Constitution | March 13, 2008
I've been following your advice about HDTV and am almost ready to make the leap and buy a new set. I'd like to hang it on the wall in my living room. Is that the sort of job I could do for myself? - Eric Ulbricht It depends on your skills, but it's sure not as simple has hanging a picture. So let me go over some of the issues involved and you can decide if it's a DIY job. First, keep in mind that a flat screen is rather delicate. Flexing the set as you manhandle it onto the wall is not a good idea.
BUSINESS
By BILL HUSTED and BILL HUSTED,The Atlanta Journal-Constitution | November 22, 2007
I am planning on buying a new computer but want to know how I transfer everything from the old computer to the new computer. This would include programs such as Norton Anti-Virus and Microsoft Word as well as pictures and other things I have stored on my old computer. How is this done and is it difficult to do? - R. Stricker Instead of transferring your programs, you'll need to install them on the new computer using the original installation CDs. While I have seen software that promises to move programs from one computer to another, I strongly recommend that you simply install the programs.
BUSINESS
By BILL HUSTED and BILL HUSTED,THE ATLANTA JOURNAL-CONSTITUTION | October 18, 2007
Lately my monitor has been flickering between light and dark and also humming. I don't suppose this is good news. Anything I can do, or is it time for a new one? - Judith Baird I think the power supply inside the monitor is going bad. If so, there's a very slight fire risk. But it's far more likely that the power supply will just stop working without flame and smoke. Replacing a monitor power supply is not a do-it-yourself job. There are dangerous currents inside the case, even when the monitor is unplugged (capacitors store power very much like a battery)
BUSINESS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,Sun reporter | October 3, 2007
State utility regulators begin debate today on proposals to scrap the way Maryland utilities buy electricity in favor of a more flexible system that some argue will eliminate price shocks like the one that hit consumers this past summer. The Public Service Commission hearings are the latest phase in a multipronged review of the state's deregulation laws that consumer advocates hope will lead to lower electricity prices. Gov. Martin O'Malley and lawmakers ordered the studies in response to outrage over a more than 70 percent rate increase for customers of Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. over the past two years.
BUSINESS
By Michael Himowitz | June 22, 1997
IT'S HOT and muggy, and it's starting to rain. In the distance I can hear the rumble of thunder and see lightning flash from cloud to cloud. The wind is shifting to the southwest, which is never a good sign in these parts, and the weatherman is saying all kinds of ominous things.In other words, it's a dangerous night for personal computers.That's because PCs and thunderstorms don't get along, and as spring turns into summer, it's a good idea to think about protecting your computer from electrical gremlins that can turn your pride and joy into a $2,000 doorstop.
BUSINESS
By Eric Benderoff and Eric Benderoff,Chicago Tribune | January 25, 2007
CHICAGO -- Mobile phones, laptops and other battery-powered devices for today's mobile work force all have at least one shortcoming: They need to be recharged. And that's a big nuisance for road warriors who have to lug power bricks on trips or even for everyday users who leave devices plugged into wall sockets at the home or office. Well, 2007 may be the year when recharging begins to go cordless. A technology called "eCoupled" that powers gadgets ranging from electric razors to iPods just by placing them on a countertop or into a slot on a car's dashboard was introduced this month at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas.
NEWS
By Siobhan Gorman and Siobhan Gorman,Sun reporter | June 24, 2007
WASHINGTON -- A year after the National Security Agency nearly maxed out its electrical capacity, some offices are experiencing significant power disruptions as the agency confronts the increasingly urgent problem of an infrastructure stretched to its limits, intelligence officials said. The spy agency has delayed the deployment of some new data-processing equipment because it is short on power and space. Outages have shut down some offices in NSA headquarters for up to half a day. And some officials fear that major problems could occur this summer as temperatures climb.
BUSINESS
By Eric Benderoff and Eric Benderoff,Chicago Tribune | January 25, 2007
CHICAGO -- Mobile phones, laptops and other battery-powered devices for today's mobile work force all have at least one shortcoming: They need to be recharged. And that's a big nuisance for road warriors who have to lug power bricks on trips or even for everyday users who leave devices plugged into wall sockets at the home or office. Well, 2007 may be the year when recharging begins to go cordless. A technology called "eCoupled" that powers gadgets ranging from electric razors to iPods just by placing them on a countertop or into a slot on a car's dashboard was introduced this month at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas.
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