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NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | March 18, 1997
City fire investigators have determined that the fire that killed six children two weeks ago was started by a power strip, a rectangular box with several electrical outlets that plugs into a wall outlet.The fire, which broke out shortly after midnight March 3 in the living room of a rowhouse in the 600 block of N. Lakewood Ave. in East Baltimore, caused thick smoke that smothered the children, who were sleeping in a second-floor bedroom. The fire killed Brandon Allen, 12, Bradley Walker, 9, Joseph Miller, 7, Frederick Ebanks 3rd, 5, Ernest Ebanks 3rd, 2, and Sharkira Walker, 2.Frederick Ebanks Jr., 27, had told fire investigators that the living room television set had been left on all night, and that became a focus of the investigation.
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BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho and Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | October 12, 2010
A Maryland company proposed Tuesday a $5 billion transmission network that would harvest electricity from wind farms along the Atlantic Seaboard — a project designed to increase green energy sources and improve the reliability of the region's taxed electricity grid. Chevy Chase-based Trans-Elect Development Co. has the backing of some well-known investors, including Google Inc., which will buy a 37.5 percent stake in the development stage of the Atlantic Wind Connection project.
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BUSINESS
By Michael J. Himowitz and Michael J. Himowitz,Evening Sun Staff | July 22, 1991
If you work with computers for any length of time, you're bound to run into a little glitch that drives you crazy -- something that goes wrong with your hardware or software and keeps you frustrated for hours or days until you realize the solution has been staring you in the face all along.For example, one of my colleagues here spent a week trying to figure out what was wrong with a new Macintosh computer.Shortly after the Mac was installed, a couple of terminals and electric typewriter nearby would suddenly quit -- drop stone-cold dead.
ENTERTAINMENT
By MIKE HIMOWITZ | December 24, 2001
THE HOLIDAY-buying rush is over, and if you're like most of us, your household will have at least one new electronic gadget with which to greet the New Year, whether it's a computer, DVD player, digital camera, Walkman or a talking doll. Unfortunately, we forget that these gadgets require what the marketers like to call "after-market support." In English, this means "extra stuff you need to make it work." While it's easy to grumble about this state of affairs, it's better to bite the bullet and get what you need now. That way, you can enjoy your gifts without worrying about something preventable going wrong or some critical supply running out. Here are some suggestions: Power protection Whether you've just bought a new computer or you've blown $400 on a game console, you now have an expensive and delicate piece of electronic equipment plugged into your household wiring.
ENTERTAINMENT
By MIKE HIMOWITZ | December 24, 2001
THE HOLIDAY-buying rush is over, and if you're like most of us, your household will have at least one new electronic gadget with which to greet the New Year, whether it's a computer, DVD player, digital camera, Walkman or a talking doll. Unfortunately, we forget that these gadgets require what the marketers like to call "after-market support." In English, this means "extra stuff you need to make it work." While it's easy to grumble about this state of affairs, it's better to bite the bullet and get what you need now. That way, you can enjoy your gifts without worrying about something preventable going wrong or some critical supply running out. Here are some suggestions: Power protection Whether you've just bought a new computer or you've blown $400 on a game console, you now have an expensive and delicate piece of electronic equipment plugged into your household wiring.
ENTERTAINMENT
By MIKE HIMOWITZ | June 15, 1998
A friend called not long ago to complain that his new modem had suddenly stopped working.I began my diagnosis with the usual, probing technical questions (Did you turn it on?) followed by the usual answers (Do you think I'm some kind of idiot?).After a few minutes of this professional give-and-take, I determined that the modem was, in fact, dead as a doornail. Since new modems generally just don't stop working, I asked my friend whether there had been a thunderstorm between the time he had last seen the modem alive and the time he discovered the corpse.
BUSINESS
By Peter H. Lewis and Peter H. Lewis,New York Times News Service | December 19, 1990
Extreme caution is advised when last-minute shoppers reach the point of desperation, the moment when they seize on the idea of finding something for the intended recipient's computer. We overheard one such shopper say brightly, "I'm not sure what kind of computer he has, but this program sure looks interesting."Not all computers are created equal, of course; a software application written for a Macintosh works about as well on an IBM PC as an audio cassette works in a videocassette player, and vice versa.
BUSINESS
By Michael Himowitz | June 22, 1997
IT'S HOT and muggy, and it's starting to rain. In the distance I can hear the rumble of thunder and see lightning flash from cloud to cloud. The wind is shifting to the southwest, which is never a good sign in these parts, and the weatherman is saying all kinds of ominous things.In other words, it's a dangerous night for personal computers.That's because PCs and thunderstorms don't get along, and as spring turns into summer, it's a good idea to think about protecting your computer from electrical gremlins that can turn your pride and joy into a $2,000 doorstop.
BUSINESS
By MICHAEL HIMOWITZ | December 21, 1997
I DON'T enjoy being the Grinch, but there's something you have to know. If you're setting up a new computer this holiday season, there's a good chance that something will go wrong.In fact, studies have consistently shown that about 10 percent of new computers emerge from the box with at least one component out of whack. And there are millions of other new PCs with problems that are, shall we say, of human origin.How do you tell which is which? Well, if something goes wrong with your new machine, try this handy, step-by-step checklist.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Himowitz | December 4, 2000
Buying a computer for the holidays is easy - all it takes is a credit card and a trunk big enough to lug it home. Making sure the PC works when you finally unwrap it takes a little more effort - but it's time well spent if you value domestic tranquility. If you're buying a PC with the intention of opening the box on Christmas morning, the first rule is to plan ahead, and then cheat a little. There's no point in turning what should be a happy family experience into a nightmare while you struggle to assemble an unfamiliar, complex gadget in the presence of impatient children who want to use it right now. If things go wrong, they'll be in tears, your spouse will be furious, and you'll feel like an idiot.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Himowitz | December 4, 2000
Buying a computer for the holidays is easy - all it takes is a credit card and a trunk big enough to lug it home. Making sure the PC works when you finally unwrap it takes a little more effort - but it's time well spent if you value domestic tranquility. If you're buying a PC with the intention of opening the box on Christmas morning, the first rule is to plan ahead, and then cheat a little. There's no point in turning what should be a happy family experience into a nightmare while you struggle to assemble an unfamiliar, complex gadget in the presence of impatient children who want to use it right now. If things go wrong, they'll be in tears, your spouse will be furious, and you'll feel like an idiot.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,SUN STAFF | June 30, 2000
A senior city education official who handed out no-bid consulting work and vacationed with a contractor has been stripped of his power to award millions of dollars in school contracts. Wilbur C. Giles Jr., the school business officer, is in the final days of a four-week suspension for his part in a contracting controversy. Giles is to return to work Monday, but in the meantime, the school board has restructured his job, raising questions about his future. Determined to improve the way city schools do business, the school board decided this week to remove contracting and purchasing from Giles' control, making them an independent operation that will report directly to the chief financial officer.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Himowitz | December 21, 1998
This is the time of year when millions of us are plugging in new computers. Most of those PCs will work just fine. Some of them won't.If you're in the unlucky minority, don't panic or start dialing the manufacturer's technical support number just yet. A completely dead PC may be suffering from problems that you can correct without opening the case or spending hours waiting on hold. In fact, they may have nothing to do with the computer itself.If the PC won't start at all, make sure you've actually turned it on. I know this sounds stupid, but it's amazing how many dead computers come to life when you feed them electricity.
ENTERTAINMENT
By MIKE HIMOWITZ | June 15, 1998
A friend called not long ago to complain that his new modem had suddenly stopped working.I began my diagnosis with the usual, probing technical questions (Did you turn it on?) followed by the usual answers (Do you think I'm some kind of idiot?).After a few minutes of this professional give-and-take, I determined that the modem was, in fact, dead as a doornail. Since new modems generally just don't stop working, I asked my friend whether there had been a thunderstorm between the time he had last seen the modem alive and the time he discovered the corpse.
BUSINESS
By MICHAEL HIMOWITZ | December 21, 1997
I DON'T enjoy being the Grinch, but there's something you have to know. If you're setting up a new computer this holiday season, there's a good chance that something will go wrong.In fact, studies have consistently shown that about 10 percent of new computers emerge from the box with at least one component out of whack. And there are millions of other new PCs with problems that are, shall we say, of human origin.How do you tell which is which? Well, if something goes wrong with your new machine, try this handy, step-by-step checklist.
BUSINESS
By Michael Himowitz | June 22, 1997
IT'S HOT and muggy, and it's starting to rain. In the distance I can hear the rumble of thunder and see lightning flash from cloud to cloud. The wind is shifting to the southwest, which is never a good sign in these parts, and the weatherman is saying all kinds of ominous things.In other words, it's a dangerous night for personal computers.That's because PCs and thunderstorms don't get along, and as spring turns into summer, it's a good idea to think about protecting your computer from electrical gremlins that can turn your pride and joy into a $2,000 doorstop.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Himowitz | December 21, 1998
This is the time of year when millions of us are plugging in new computers. Most of those PCs will work just fine. Some of them won't.If you're in the unlucky minority, don't panic or start dialing the manufacturer's technical support number just yet. A completely dead PC may be suffering from problems that you can correct without opening the case or spending hours waiting on hold. In fact, they may have nothing to do with the computer itself.If the PC won't start at all, make sure you've actually turned it on. I know this sounds stupid, but it's amazing how many dead computers come to life when you feed them electricity.
BUSINESS
By Michael J. Himowitz | December 22, 1996
WITH THE KIDS staring over your shoulder, you nervously unwrap the new computer, separate the hardware from the Styrofoam, read the instruction sheet, plug everything in, flick the power switch and -- nothing.The kids start to fidget. You read the instructions again, check all the connections, and push the power button again. Nothing. The kids start asking questions. You can't answer them.You fuss some more, read some more. Still nothing. Everyone starts offering suggestions. You call your brother-in-law, the computer expert.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | March 18, 1997
City fire investigators have determined that the fire that killed six children two weeks ago was started by a power strip, a rectangular box with several electrical outlets that plugs into a wall outlet.The fire, which broke out shortly after midnight March 3 in the living room of a rowhouse in the 600 block of N. Lakewood Ave. in East Baltimore, caused thick smoke that smothered the children, who were sleeping in a second-floor bedroom. The fire killed Brandon Allen, 12, Bradley Walker, 9, Joseph Miller, 7, Frederick Ebanks 3rd, 5, Ernest Ebanks 3rd, 2, and Sharkira Walker, 2.Frederick Ebanks Jr., 27, had told fire investigators that the living room television set had been left on all night, and that became a focus of the investigation.
BUSINESS
By Michael J. Himowitz | December 22, 1996
WITH THE KIDS staring over your shoulder, you nervously unwrap the new computer, separate the hardware from the Styrofoam, read the instruction sheet, plug everything in, flick the power switch and -- nothing.The kids start to fidget. You read the instructions again, check all the connections, and push the power button again. Nothing. The kids start asking questions. You can't answer them.You fuss some more, read some more. Still nothing. Everyone starts offering suggestions. You call your brother-in-law, the computer expert.
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