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By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2010
For years, Marylanders have been warned about the risk of blackouts as the region's growing energy needs overload the electricity grid. One solution to ease such threats has been to build several high-voltage transmission lines to ship electricity to the region, including a contentious proposal to build a line connecting West Virginia to Maryland. Called the Potomac-Appalachian Transmission Highline, that project is slowly moving forward amid regulatory hurdles and opposition from residents and environmentalists.
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BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2014
A helicopter will be hovering above power lines throughout Central Maryland in coming weeks, but don't worry. It's not the NSA. Baltimore Gas & Electric Co., which provides power to Maryland's most populated regions, will be contracting the utility helicopter to allow for inspections of its electric transmission equipment through next month, the company said Thursday. The helicopter will be used in Anne Arundel, Baltimore, Howard and Prince George's counties, and may be spotted "hovering near power lines and rights of way or following a flight path along electric transmission rights of way," the company said.
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BUSINESS
By Allison Connolly | December 29, 2007
American Electric Power and Allegheny Energy said yesterday that they have filed a request with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission to approve a rate formula to recover the cost of building a $1.8 billion, 290-mile-long, extra-high-voltage transmission line from West Virginia to Frederick. If the formula is approved, the PJM Interconnection, which operates the regional power grid, would use it to charge utilities in 13 states for the use of energy from that system. Maryland is part of that grid.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | April 3, 2014
An Amtrak train tore down overhead catenary power lines in an accident near Bowie on Thursday morning, disrupting rail traffic in the area and the commutes of many MARC and Amtrak riders, according to the Maryland Transit Administration. Craig Schulz, an Amtrak spokesman, said the incident occurred about 9:30 a.m. and left the Northeast Corridor train No. 181 — carrying 177 passengers — without power. It also stopped all Amtrak and MARC traffic between Baltimore and Washington.
NEWS
November 21, 1991
A Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. employee was seriously burned yesterday when he touched an above-ground power line in Columbia.Charles Dobry, 28, was injured at Mills and Columbia roads about 9:45 a.m., Howard County police said. He was taken to the Francis Scott Key Medical Center burn unit by medevac helicopter, suffering from second- and third-degree burns to his arms, face and chest, according to police.He was listed in fair condition last night.
NEWS
By Kurt Streeter and Kurt Streeter,SUN STAFF | November 23, 1999
A West Baltimore man delivering tiles for a local roofing company was electrocuted yesterday when a pole attached to a van he was driving hit a power line, police said.Ricky Reed, 42, died about 10: 45 a.m. when an extended metal boom on the van he was backing up hit a power line in the 3600 block of Windsor Mill Road in West Baltimore, said Agent Ragina L. Cooper, a police department spokeswoman.Reed's co-worker, Reginald Della, 40, of East Baltimore, survived after he jumped out of the truck as the shock occurred, Cooper said.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | May 16, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Pepco Holdings Inc., owner of utilities in Washington and four states, sought approval yesterday to build a $1.2 billion high-voltage power line from Northern Virginia to New Jersey to meet growing demand in the largest U.S. power market. The proposal for the 230-mile, 500 kilovolt-line was filed with PJM Interconnection LLC, which runs the power market and grid in the District of Columbia and all or parts of 13 states including Virginia, Maryland and New Jersey. Pepco's proposal is the third this year for an interstate power line in PJM after enactment of a federal law aimed at speeding approval of such projects and lowering regulatory costs.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 14, 1995
The world's largest group of physicists, the American Physical Society, has taken a stance on a contentious public health issue by saying it can find no evidence that the electromagnetic fields that radiate from power lines cause cancer.The group's statement, issued recently after years of quiet deliberation, appears to be the strongest such statement by a scientific society in the 15 years or so that the issue has been debated.The society said that groundless public fears about a possible link between power lines and cancer were diverting billions of dollars into mitigation work.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | November 14, 1999
Interstate 95 near Route 175 in Howard County will be closed in both directions this morning while utility crews repair a power line that was damaged in a tractor-trailer accident.All lanes of the highway will be closed between 6 a.m. and 11 a.m. with traffic allowed to pass every 15 minutes.Delays are likely to occur, and motorists are advised to take alternative routes.The 13,000-volt power line was knocked down about 9 a.m. Friday, when the truck hit a utility pole north of the Route 175 exit, according to state police.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | June 28, 2000
Light rail service in the southern part of Baltimore will be disrupted for several days as workers replace a 1.2-mile section of track, part of which was damaged when an overhead power line fell on it Monday night. Fourteen of 27 passengers aboard the train suffered smoke inhalation from sparks that were generated by the live power line hitting the track. They were treated and released from three area hospitals, Mass Transit Administration officials said. The incident occurred about 11:30 p.m. north of the Westport station.
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | June 14, 2013
The Harford County Department of Emergency Services urges Harford County residents to prepare for a squall line of thunderstorms with heavy rain, lightning, hail, high winds and higher tides as a result of a fast moving and severe weather event approaching the region Thursday. As storm moves across the state, Harford County and other areas of Maryland could feel the effects, the county government warned in a news release issued Wednesday. The Harford County Department of Emergency Services recommends residents to prepare for the storm by reviewing their storm survival plan and restocking any needed food, water or other supplies to get them through the storm.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | January 29, 2013
A Silver Spring man crashed his homemade gyrocopter into a field in Carroll County Tuesday afternoon after hitting a power line, officials said. Sheriff's deputies found Amirkhanian Shahram, 58, in the 700 block of Oak Tree Road in Westminster about 4:30 p.m. with no apparent injuries. The power line the gyrocopter hit as it was coming to land was not severed, and no residents lost power. The gyrocopter was heavily damaged and is being investigated by Federal Aviation Administration and other officials.
NEWS
December 28, 2012
We have to think more creatively about how we protect both trees and power lines ("A bid to trim power outages," Dec. 23). As Jamie Smith Hopkins ' article noted, we can no more be asked to choose between trees or power than we can be asked to choose between eating or drinking. Both are necessary. Here is one proposal to get us closer to having both. We all understand that given the sometimes unfortunate placement of trees and wires, trees must come down. But currently, BGE is not required to replace every tree it takes down.
NEWS
November 3, 2012
Dan Rodricks had a great column ("Scary storms in the age of information," Oct. 30) and I could not agree more. When will we begin to have a serious discussion about making the proper investments in improving our infrastructure as it relates to how we receive our power in Maryland? Recent climatic events clearly point to the need for us to do something other than "kick the can down the road. " I agree with Mr. Rodricks when he points out that climate scientists observe, "we have sufficiently damaged the atmosphere in a way that will make such events more common and more deadly.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | October 30, 2012
Sandy knocked out power to Howard County's "water reclamation" plant in Savage, causing 20 to 25 million gallons of untreated but rain-diluted human waste to spill into the Little Patuxent River, a branch of one of the Chesapeake Bay's most degraded tributaries. County Executive Ken Ulman called the outage "unacceptable" and called for a "full audit" of how to prevent future overflows. Another big storm, another big sewage spill - this time in Howard County. Sandy knocked out power to the county's "water reclamation" plant in Savage late Monday night, causing 20 million to 25 million gallons of untreated but rain-diluted human waste to spill into the Little Patuxent River, a branch of one of the Chesapeake Bay's most degraded tributaries.
NEWS
September 19, 2012
There's a simple solution to keep the power on: Make BGE hire 100 to 200 people - probably a lot less than they got rid of about 10 years ago - and start burying the lines ("The light goes on at BGE," Sept. 17). How much would that cost each customer, a buck or two a month? With the high unemployment it would help locals get decent paying jobs. Then when there is an outage, BGE would have these workers available to make repairs. They could be pulled from burying lines to fixing them.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | November 4, 1998
Two painters working outside a Roland Park apartment building were electrocuted yesterday when their aluminum ladder hit a power line, causing a deadly surge that sent thousands of volts through their bodies.The morning accident injured two other workers, one of them critically, and knocked out power to The Tuscany, a four-story co-op on Stony Run Lane.The electrical short made a noise loud enough to startle people a block away. The current singed the bottom rungs of the ladder, burned a metal gutter at the top of the four-story building and set leaves on the ground on fire.
NEWS
By Bill Talbott and Bill Talbott,Staff Writer | October 26, 1993
A 25-year-old electrical worker was in serious condition at the Francis Scott Key burn center in Baltimore after he touched a newly energized 115,000-volt power line in Finksburg yesterday afternoon.The worker, who was not immediately identified, was trapped on the line about 50 feet above the ground and had to be rescued by fellow workers of Henkels & McCoy, a subcontractor for the Baltimore Gas and Electric Co.They lowered him from the 75-foot pole to the ground, where he was placed in a wire "Stokes basket" -- a wire enclosure used to carry injured people over rough terrain -- and carried about 200 feet down a steep hill to a waiting ambulance.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2012
Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. officials told state energy regulators Thursday that major changes to the electricity grid, including burying some power lines and more aggressively trimming trees, are needed to prevent long-term outages like the one that followed the June 29 derecho. "A part of the solution has to be having less damage to repair," CEO Kenneth W. DeFontes Jr. said at a Maryland Public Service Commission hearing on utilities' response to the storm. "Undergrounding selectively has to be part of the solution.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2012
Gov. Martin O'Malley's administration launched an effort Tuesday to limit the extended power outages that have troubled Marylanders in recent months, but industry experts warned that any solution could require significant costs and trade-offs. Montgomery County Councilman Roger Berliner said it was an outrage that reliability in Maryland doesn't match that of some countries, where a year's worth of outages are measured in a matter of minutes. "Power outages have become the No. 1 threat to our quality of life," said Berliner, a member of a new gubernatorial task force on electricity reliability.
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