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NEWS
November 26, 2012
Approximately 200,000 people in Maryland were left without power in wake of hurricane Sandy on Oct. 30 2012. Three days later only 700 houses were still left without power. Jeannette M. Mills at Baltimore Gas and Electricity observed that the quick restoration was partially made possible by smart meters and smart grid, made of two-way communications systems, smart meters and sensors, similar to shift from analog to digital system in cable services. Smart meters pinpoint precise locations of meters to electricity service sources through digital communication, thus saving time, dollars and wasteful service rounds to locations where power has been already restored.
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BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | January 23, 2014
The state's utility regulators are asking Marylanders to conserve energy as demand caused by the cold snap puts extra pressure on the region's power grid. Higher electricity use means the regional grid operator "is managing a very tight power supply, especially in the BGE and Pepco regions," the Maryland Public Service Commission said in a statement Thursday. Officials also urged customers to conserve power during the earlier run of freezing temperatures this month. Conservation is most needed weekdays from 6 a.m. to 9 a.m. and again from 3 p.m. to 7 p.m., the Public Service Commission said.
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BUSINESS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2012
The state's power grid operator does not need a $3.3 billion pair of transmission line projects built through Maryland because the weak economy has slowed demand for electricity, the staff of operator PJM Interconnection has concluded. The staff will recommend that PJM's board cancel the Mid-Atlantic Power Pathway, or MAPP, and Potomac-Appalachian Transmission Highline, or PATH, because its analysis showed they are not needed to maintain reliability of the power grid, according to a presentation PJM released Wednesday.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2013
Federal regulators investigating Exelon's Constellation commodities group say they have "preliminarily determined" that the division violated market-behavior rules. The brief notice, filed Friday by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, said only that the alleged violations involve not providing accurate information to a power grid operator, the California Independent System Operator. FERC declined to comment. Constellation, the Baltimore energy company bought by Chicago-based Exelon last year, downplayed the investigation.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | June 23, 2012
GPS technology is integrated into the operation of nearly every piece of farming equipment Finch Services Inc. sells in Maryland and Pennsylvania, helping farmers ensure they don't cover the same ground twice when scattering seeds or spraying fields. Without a satellite signal, the machinery would be rendered useless, said Trevor Prior, a Finch salesman in Westminster. Users of the location-finding system — found in tractors and cars and military missiles — could soon find themselves lost, depending on the weather in space.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Michael Dresser and Gus G. Sentementes and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | August 2, 2001
Maryland regulators teamed up with their counterparts in Virginia and the District of Columbia yesterday to challenge a federal order that would force a merger of the highly regarded mid-Atlantic power grid, widely hailed as the region's best defense against the electricity shortages and skyrocketing prices that have afflicted California. Maryland Public Service Commission Chairman Catherine I. Riley said in a statement that a July 12 order by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission that would merge the PJM Interconnection grid with two others "adds a huge new variable of instability" to electric restructuring.
BUSINESS
By PAUL ADAMS and PAUL ADAMS,SUN REPORTER | July 19, 2006
The region's power grid held up despite record demand for electricity along the Eastern Seaboard yesterday, but energy experts say this week's heat wave has stressed the system and highlighted the need for investment in new transmission lines to keep prices down and ensure reliability. The PJM Interconnection, which operates the electric grid for 51 million people in Maryland and 12 other states, said peak demand in the power pool reached about 134,721 megawatts yesterday afternoon, down slightly from Monday's record of 139,746 megawatts.
BUSINESS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | April 27, 2002
After news of a 15 percent drop in first-quarter core earnings caused mostly by a mild winter and lower power prices, Constellation Energy Group Inc.'s new chief executive said yesterday that the energy company is considering selling Baltimore Gas and Electric Co.'s transmission business. Addressing the issue for the first time since taking charge Nov. 1, CEO Mayo A. Shattuck III said selling BGE's "pipes and wires" could happen within a five-year period depending on how the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission decides to connect the nation's power grid.
NEWS
July 27, 2012
Say this for Baltimore Gas & Electric Co., they have a curious sense of timing. Six years ago, they sought a 72 percent rate increase at the same time that their parent company was seeking approval for a merger - and in the middle of a gubernatorial election. That didn't go so well. Now the company is seeking a rate increase - albeit a much more modest one - just after hundreds of thousands of its customers were without power, some of them for more than a week, raising the ire of residents and politicians alike.
NEWS
July 12, 2012
Those who want to witness the benefits of underground electrical lines on a dedicated power grid need only drive down Route 29 into Howard County and pull off into Columbia. James Rouse, the visionary planner of Columbia, set out to design a modern city, which anticipated over 100,000 residents. In doing so, all aspects of city life were taken into consideration. At the top of his list must have been buried utilities. Thank God for his insight. Today, Columbia is for most the part (although some neighborhoods share an above-ground grid)
NEWS
November 26, 2012
Approximately 200,000 people in Maryland were left without power in wake of hurricane Sandy on Oct. 30 2012. Three days later only 700 houses were still left without power. Jeannette M. Mills at Baltimore Gas and Electricity observed that the quick restoration was partially made possible by smart meters and smart grid, made of two-way communications systems, smart meters and sensors, similar to shift from analog to digital system in cable services. Smart meters pinpoint precise locations of meters to electricity service sources through digital communication, thus saving time, dollars and wasteful service rounds to locations where power has been already restored.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | November 1, 2012
Linda Kemphfer held out overnight as the power, heat and water went out, but grew frightened as it became apparent she was trapped in her home deep in the woods of Garrett County. "We were going to freeze to death," she said of her decision to call 911 this week as superstorm Sandy continued to add to the snow mounds piling up around her. "It was stressful, worrying whether you're going to get out or not. " By the time three members of the National Guard arrived on snowmobiles, after having cut a path through fallen trees to her home with a chain saw, it was nearly dark, she said.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2012
Each year in Arundel on the Bay, the neighborhood's power goes out five, six or seven times, leaving residents in the dark with refrigerators of spoiling food and without water, since their well pumps run on electricity. "There's a part of me that's really incredulous," resident Tim Hamilton said this week, unloading years of simmering frustration during a meeting with Baltimore Gas and Electric Co.'s supervisor of reliability. "I've never lived in a place where people buy generators like they live in a Third World country.
NEWS
By Henry F. Cooper | September 6, 2012
Recent reports suggest that the U.S. government was likely engaged in two very sophisticated cyber attacks: one that spied on Iran's nuclear program and another that slowed it by destroying centrifuges. These attacks encourage a twinge of national pride in our cyber capabilities. Yet there's a dark corollary to this news. Our enemies can use similarly sophisticated cyber tactics to attack the U.S. government and our private sector. Billions in intellectual property and state secrets are at risk, as well as the critical infrastructure that supports modern American life.
NEWS
August 24, 2012
I read the article ("Panel grapples with power grid concerns," Aug. 22) describing the challenges facing Gov. Martin O'Malley's new commission studying reliability issues and just shook my head. The problem is that top management was told about reliability problems, decrepit infrastructure, lack of coordinated operations upgrades, etc., and they chose to ignore these problems for decades because the utilities are owned and operated by corporations that have to deliver profits for its investors.
BUSINESS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2012
The state's power grid operator does not need a $3.3 billion pair of transmission line projects built through Maryland because the weak economy has slowed demand for electricity, the staff of operator PJM Interconnection has concluded. The staff will recommend that PJM's board cancel the Mid-Atlantic Power Pathway, or MAPP, and Potomac-Appalachian Transmission Highline, or PATH, because its analysis showed they are not needed to maintain reliability of the power grid, according to a presentation PJM released Wednesday.
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | August 15, 2003
For customers in Maryland and neighboring areas, the system worked. The most widespread blackout in the nation's history, which darkened parts of the Northeast and Midwest as well as Canada last evening, didn't spread much farther south thanks to circuit breakers in the multi-state power grid that carries electricity to consumers between New Jersey and Virginia. The exact cause of the blackout remained unknown last night, although it was believed to have been triggered by a "massive disturbance" in northern New York or Ottawa, according to the head of PJM Interconnection.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Evening Sun Staff | September 17, 1991
The late-summer heat wave that continued to smash record in Baltimore and Washington today has caught the region's utility managers with their plants down.Routine plant shutdowns, timed for the slack periods between the demand peaks of summer and winter, left the power grid with barely enough reserve generating power to cope with record-breaking heat and humidity, officials said."We've just got everything loaded to the hilt," Charles B. Woodward said as demand peaked yesterday. Woodward is operations manager at the Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Maryland Interconnection, which manages the electrical power grid serving 21 million people from New York to Washington.
NEWS
July 27, 2012
Say this for Baltimore Gas & Electric Co., they have a curious sense of timing. Six years ago, they sought a 72 percent rate increase at the same time that their parent company was seeking approval for a merger - and in the middle of a gubernatorial election. That didn't go so well. Now the company is seeking a rate increase - albeit a much more modest one - just after hundreds of thousands of its customers were without power, some of them for more than a week, raising the ire of residents and politicians alike.
NEWS
July 12, 2012
Those who want to witness the benefits of underground electrical lines on a dedicated power grid need only drive down Route 29 into Howard County and pull off into Columbia. James Rouse, the visionary planner of Columbia, set out to design a modern city, which anticipated over 100,000 residents. In doing so, all aspects of city life were taken into consideration. At the top of his list must have been buried utilities. Thank God for his insight. Today, Columbia is for most the part (although some neighborhoods share an above-ground grid)
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