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NEWS
September 27, 1991
The Census Bureau has estimated that 9.9 percent of Maryland's population and 13.5 percent of the country's population lived in poverty in 1990. Figures show the number of poor Americans grew to 33.6 million last year, the first increase since 1983.The Evening Sun wants to know if you think Maryland, even with its current budget problems, should be doing more for the state's poor. Should the United States declare another war on poverty to help people improve their lives? Do you think taxes should be raise to provide more money for the poor?
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NEWS
By Robert Blecker | October 3, 2014
The root cause of undocumented immigration, whether from Mexico or Central America, is the poverty and lack of economic opportunity that have afflicted those nations as a result of failed economic policies - including their trade agreements with the United States. Those thousands of migrants - including unaccompanied minors - arriving at our border are not criminals trying to break the law. They are a warning sign that the collateral damage of so-called "free trade" agreements cannot always be found in closed factories and shuttered Main Street businesses in the United States.
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NEWS
January 24, 2011
Thank you for Patrick Whelan and Kathleen Kennedy Townsend's deeply moving remembrance of one of Maryland's finest sons ever, Sargent Shriver ( "Living the faith," Jan 23). His incredible legacy of service and selflessness includes even more than the Peace Corps, Head Start, Job Corps, Volunteers in Service to America, Upward Bound, Foster Grandparents and other programs Ms. Townsend and Mr. Whelan cite. Forty-seven years ago, Mr. Shriver also created and provided the groundwork for the Community Action Programs — agencies that work to help low-income and other vulnerable people and families attain economic security.
NEWS
By Dana Stein | September 24, 2014
AmeriCorps, which engages over 75,000 Americans in service projects annually, turned 20 this month. Since the program's inception, over 900,000 AmeriCorps members have contributed over 1 billion hours in service - including 4,000 AmeriCorps members in Baltimore through Civic Works, a non-profit I founded in 1993 to strengthen Baltimore's communities through education, skills development and community service. Too many young people in Baltimore struggle to stay on track in school and build the essential workplace skills needed to gain meaningful employment.
NEWS
January 3, 2014
In reference to the editorial, "A lost year" (Jan. 1), I agree that Baltimore's police department and mayor must continue to improve their tactics to reduce homicides and violent crime. But it is very obvious to me that several factors contribute tremendously to the violent crime rate in Baltimore. It is a very simple equation: guns + drugs + poverty = violent crime and murder. No need to understand complex quantum physics equations. The city police department must continue to do its part, but any success in curtailing violent crime will be dependent on containing guns, drugs and poverty.
NEWS
September 16, 2013
While minimum wage laws may be becoming popular with power brokers in the Maryland legislature, they remain an example of a well-intentioned piece of public policy that will hurt Maryland workers far more than any benefits it may create (" Miller joins voices urging minimum wage hike Sept. 5). Minimum wage laws attempt to create a minimum standard of living to protect the health and well-being of employees by mandating a base level of pay that employers are required to pay certain covered employees.
NEWS
September 24, 2011
When I learned that single motherhood was the lowest rung of the prosperity ladder 40 years ago, I asked myself, "Why would I choose that?" Is that still the problem today? Where are the fathers? Where are the husbands? Must fathers live apart from mothers and children so that the government at all levels can give them money? Is it working? Are Baltimore, Maryland, and the federal government proving themselves good parents? Can we reverse this? Are kids so accustomed to having government buy food and shelter that they only have to pay for iPhones?
NEWS
September 20, 2011
The stark irony of your recent editorial ("The nonworking poor," Sept. 18) appearing on the same page as a Doonesbury comic strip noting that 400 families control more wealth than 50 percent of Americans' combined was inescapable. Thank you for your thoughtful, balanced analysis of the reality of poverty across our nation. Clearly, the recession is not over for more than 46 million poor Americans. When nearly one in eight Americans is officially poor, we must examine whether a family of four can exist on $22,351 year.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | April 16, 2012
There is good news - and some familiar bad news - in recent research into the stubborn question of why our babies have babies when it is such a spectacularly bad idea for both mother and child. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said last week that teen births have hit an all-time low. In 2010, there were 34.4 births per 1,000 women ages 15 to 19, a 9 percent drop from the year before. What makes this news even more welcome is that the birthrate among teens ticked up in the mid-2000s after 20 years of declines, and researchers were at a loss to explain why. Researchers are cautiously attributing the decrease to the public service campaigns that urge kids to delay sex for a while, and then to use contraceptives the first time and every time.
NEWS
July 13, 2013
Vann Ellison is right about three things in his recent commentary on poverty and social enterprise ("Beyond government," July 10): Our country hasn't done an effective job of addressing poverty. Partisan gridlock weakens the social safety net and social enterprises can be effective in getting people back to work, even if they can't ensure wages sufficient for them to afford market-rate housing. Unfortunately, Mr. Ellison misses the mark on just about everything else. That poverty persists in the richest nation in the history of history is worthy of serious exploration.
NEWS
By Tony Brown | August 22, 2014
My sophomore year Harvard announced a cost-cutting measure that made the news. Going forward the school would continue to provide toilet paper to freshmen dorms, but upper classmen would have to provide for themselves. Almost immediately, toilet paper began disappearing from buildings all over campus. One Monday night my roommate and I discovered that we were low on supplies, so after dinner we walked up the hill to Harvard Yard to visit the freshmen dorms. In a building with communal bathrooms (where we could easily lay hands on a few rolls)
NEWS
July 31, 2014
Thank you for your thoughtful, balanced editorial on Republican Rep. Paul Ryan's recent discussion of poverty ( "Ryan's safety net," July 28). A quick read of Congressman Ryan's proposal show his appreciation of the federal Earned Income Tax Credit as an effective strategy for helping low-income working families rise out of poverty or at least improve their economic security. However, Mr. Ryan's proposals for SNAP (formerly food stamps) are, as noted by Democratic Rep. Chris Van Hollen, problematic in that they remove protections for poor families who need such food assistance.
NEWS
July 31, 2014
I just finished reading Paul Ryan's discussion draft of "Expanding Opportunity in America" referred to in your editorial ( "Ryan's safety net," July 28). In addition to discussions of the social safety net and the Earned Income Tax Credit, there are also thought-provoking recommendations about education, criminal justice and regulatory reform. It ought to be required reading for all informed, unbiased citizens. Lyle Rescott, Marriottsville - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | July 31, 2014
Cover your eyes and hide the kids: A Republican is talking poverty. This has not been a pretty picture in the recent past. Who can forget then-South Carolina Lt. Gov. Andre Bauer likening poor people to animals one feeds from the back door and Nebraska Attorney General Jon Bruning calling them stray raccoons? And let's not even get into Mitt Romney's wholesale slander of the so-called "47 percent. " So one receives with a certain trepidation the news that Romney's running mate, Rep. Paul Ryan, has issued a proposal aimed at curbing poverty.
NEWS
July 16, 2014
The article "On the march again against city's violence" (July 12) included some clues about why violence develops and how it might be countered. Philip Leaf referred to "neighborhoods where social cohesion and support have been devastated. " Thus, people wind up feeling detached from the very place they are living and lack incentive to feel any pride in keeping things up. Then there was the picture of a father engaging with his sons, sons who bore the father's last name.
NEWS
July 15, 2014
Letter writer Eric Rozenman concludes that the Palestinian "celebration" of the killing of three Israeli teenagers last month is noteworthy because Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu quickly announced his regrets and said the perpetrators would be brought to justice ( "Sun offers false equivalence between Israelis and Palestinians," July 11). Further, Mr. Rozenman concludes that the Arab rejection of a "two-state solution" over the last several years is evidence that the Palestinians would rather engage in conflict than have peace.
NEWS
May 19, 1995
Poverty is always relative, but that does not make it less real. True, Americans whose food stamps give out before the end of every month don't suffer the severe malnutrition and marginal existence that defines poverty in many parts of the world. But that's little comfort to a hungry child, or to a desperate parent trying to rock that child to sleep.For years, conservatives have claimed that government definitions misstate the extent of poverty in the United States. If the formula accurately reflected the effect of government benefits on household benefits, they argued, the poverty level in this country would drop dramatically.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | July 12, 2014
Frank Sinatra's song about Chicago, "My Kind of Town," "a the town that won't let you down," seems dated in light of last weekend's shooting spree that left 16 dead and dozens wounded in 53 separate incidents. According to the Chicago Tribune, "The victims were among 82 people shot between Thursday afternoon and early Monday. "   Chicago wasn't alone in the Independence Day violence. New York City and Detroit combined for 10 dead in 46 shootings, but let's stick with Chicago where violence in mainly poor African-American and Hispanic neighborhoods has become a way of death.
NEWS
June 25, 2014
Dan Rodricks wrote movingly of a Johns Hopkins study of poverty that found if you are born poor in Baltimore, the chances are you will remain poor ( "A Hopkins sociologist busts an American myth," June 17). Yet the Hopkins study apparently says nothing about the rise of single-parent families and their statistical correlation to poverty and inequality. According to numerous studies, the two-parent family has declined rapidly in recent decades. In 1960, more than 76 percent of African-Americans and nearly 97 percent of whites were born to married couples.
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