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Pounds Of Food

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NEWS
November 27, 1991
More than 109,000 pounds of food and $32,000 in donations have been collected so far in the annual Bags of Plenty campaign, a program of the Maryland Food Bank Inc. and the Maryland Food Committee.The collections are enough to provide Thanksgiving baskets to some 5,000 poor families and represent donations from more than 7,000 contributors. This year's campaign aims to raise at least $150,000 and 425,000 pounds of food.Donations will be used to meet emergency food needs this winter and for self-help programs.
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NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | January 24, 2014
The Maryland Food Bank is requesting volunteers on weekdays to sort a backlog of donated food, the charity said Friday. More than half a million pounds of food - the equivalent of 17 tractor trailers worth of food - is sitting in the food bank warehouse at its headquarters in Baltimore County. The food is a mixed assortment from food drives and retail donations, and must be sorted and packed. Officials said the demand is so great that the food volunteers do pack is ordered by soup kitchens, pantries and other groups within 2 hours.
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NEWS
April 10, 2000
After a week's extension, organizers of the first statewide Harvest for the Hungry drive announced recently that 413,000 pounds of food and personal care items have been collected. Postal employees collected donations from homes and post office collection sites from March 11 to 25, hoping to gather a pound for every Marylander living in poverty -- about 440,000 pounds. The drive fell short of that number, but did receive nearly 13,000 pounds of items such as soap, shampoo and deodorant from CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield and its employees, in addition to the food donations.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | April 23, 2013
The United Way of Central Maryland's Access to Healthy Food Initiative distributed more than 2.8 million pounds of groceries - enough to fill 56 tractor trailers - to low-income individuals and families, the organization announced Tuesday. Businesses, organizations and individuals, including 89 healthy food drives across the region hosted by Constellation Energy, Johns Hopkins institutions, LifeBridge Health and others, made contributions. The amount of food is nearly double the initiative's first-year goal set when it kicked off in 2011.
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez and Rafael Alvarez,Staff Writer | February 16, 1992
Postal Service letter carriers are trained to go to your house and drop things off, but this past week they juggled that job with picking things up -- more than 300,000 pounds of food for the poor.The weeklong "Harvest for the Hungry" -- an easy-as-pie charity event that ended yesterday and asked only that Marylanders give a few canned goods to the people who deliver their mail -- turned into one of the most successful food drives in recent memory. Postal workers in Delaware also helped out.By late yesterday, those big tractor trailers the post office uses to haul phone bills, love letters and hate mail were still unloading goodies at the Maryland Food Bank warehouse in West Baltimore.
NEWS
By Rachel D. Mansour and Rachel D. Mansour,SUN STAFF | October 17, 1999
The Anne Arundel County Food Bank is counting on students to help feed the needy as they embark on the annual Harvest for the Hungry "Kids Helping Kids" campaign.The goal is tons upon tons of food -- perhaps more than the 43,000 pounds brought in last year as 40 county schools joined in the three-week fall campaign. Statewide, a 213-school effort harvested 147,000 pounds of food to help needy families across Maryland."We come out of the summer months pretty well drained of food," said Bruce Michalec, director of the county food bank, "so [this]
NEWS
By Michael Fletcher and Michael Fletcher,Staff Writer | February 28, 1993
Baltimore area postal workers are extending their second annual food drive until Wednesday, in hopes of reaching their goal of collecting 600,000 pounds of food for the poor.The postal service's part of the statewide Harvest for the Hungry food drive had been scheduled to end yesterday.But donations were slowed by two recent snows and officials are extending the drive until Wednesday, said Patricia Liberto, a member of the Harvest for the Hungry's committee.Postal customers can donate food by placing canned or other nonperishable goods near their mailboxes.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | December 10, 1998
Bags of Plenty has ended its 1998 Baltimore-area drive with 210,550 pounds of donated food for the needy, 5 percent more than last year's regional collection of 199,000 pounds.Bill Ewing, executive director of Maryland Food Bank, said nonperishable food from elsewhere in Maryland is coming in, and the statewide total will likely reach 300,000 pounds, surpassing last year's collection.The Maryland Food Committee arm of the Center for Poverty Solutions reports that, with its campaign for cash nearly over, it has raised $17,240, compared with $47,657 in 1997.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | May 9, 1997
The Maryland Food Bank hopes to collect 10 percent more food than last year during tomorrow's fifth annual National Letter Carrier Food Drive.Residents in Baltimore City and Anne Arundel, Baltimore, Carroll, Harford and Howard counties are asked to leave canned and other nonperishable food items at their mailboxes for pickup by letter carriers.The food, which can be left at post offices, will be distributed in the summer to the needy in areas where collected. The drive raised 203,631 pounds of food last year and about 170,000 pounds in 1995.
NEWS
December 14, 1990
The fifth annual Bags of Plenty food drive and fund-raiser conducted by the Maryland Food Committee has received $119,000 and more than 406,000 pounds of food. The campaign officially ends today, but monetary donations will be accepted through Dec. 31.More than 30,000 people have contributed to Bags of Plenty so far this year. Although the contributions of food fell short of the drive's goals, the money collected is to be used to buy additional food for the state's emergency pantries.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,mary.gail.hare@baltsun.com | September 16, 2009
The Maryland Food Bank broke ground Tuesday on a 6,000-square-foot, commercially equipped kitchen that will allow the nonprofit agency to turn fresh donations from area markets into about 1 million free meals a year. The $1.3 million facility at the food bank's headquarters in Halethorpe is expected to be completed in the spring and will also be used to train workers in food preparation. "We have many food markets willing to donate, but we have nowhere to turn the food into meals," said Audra Harrison, the food bank's spokeswoman.
NEWS
By Ruma Kumar | December 21, 2007
Ten South River High School teachers and their principal donned bathing suits and plunged into the chilly waters of the South River on Wednesday afternoon, as part of a promise they made to students for donating at least 1,000 pounds of food for charity. The students gave more than 50,000 pounds of canned and dry goods to the Anne Arundel County Food Bank to feed the homeless and hungry during the holidays. The donations were made through the Kids Helping Kids program, a statewide three-week food collection campaign.
BUSINESS
By NANCY JONES-BONBREST and NANCY JONES-BONBREST,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 12, 2007
John May Chief operations officer Maryland Food Bank, Halethorpe Salary --$84,000 Age --42 Years on the job --1.5 How he got started --After working for 17 years in logistics and distribution for large retail stores, May decided to semi-retire. "At the end of the day, I wanted to know I made an impact. Shipping goods to stores didn't have that impact." He and his wife bought two Curves gym franchises, but six weeks later an opportunity at the Maryland Food Bank surfaced. And May, the father of quadruplets, had always wanted to work for a nonprofit.
NEWS
November 21, 2007
In this season of bounty, there are troubling reminders of hunger in our midst that should not be acceptable. Two reports last week found that the number of hungry Americans, including children, remains about the same, which is way too many people. And things aren't likely to get better as food, energy and housing costs are increasing while salaries remain the same or decline. Reducing hunger requires more aggressive public and private action. The federal Department of Agriculture reported that in 2006, there was a slight increase in "food insecure" households, up from 12.59 million in 2005 to 12.65 million in 2006, or nearly 11 percent of all households.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,Sun reporter | September 10, 2007
Deborah Flateman's cell phone is squawking. Her schedule is full of board meetings, conference calls and cocktail parties. And she's sifting through reports with growth figures and projections. Like many corporate executives, Flateman is looking to increase production, streamline distribution and improve inventory tracking. But she never has to worry about losing customers. They are Maryland's hungry, estimated at 516,000 and growing. "It's a huge responsibility," says Flateman, director of the Maryland Food Bank.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,[special to the sun] | December 17, 2006
Last year, Nicole Schar initiated a program in which teachers, staff members and students at Deerfield Elementary School donated food and gifts to needy families in the school community for the holidays. Although the response was solid, and a few teachers participated last year, Schar, a second-grade teacher, wanted to make the program bigger this year. She and another teacher created the Ho Ho Committee and encouraged faculty and staff members to help needy families again this season.
NEWS
By Kimberly A.C. Wilson and Kimberly A.C. Wilson,SUN STAFF | March 27, 2001
This year's Harvest for the Hungry is no bumper crop. Officials at the Maryland Food Bank and U.S. Postal Service, which have collected only a fifth of their original goal of 100,000 pounds of nonperishable food donations this month, have extended the annual food drive through Saturday. "We're at the 11th hour and 59th minute. We're holding out hope that things work out, but if the public doesn't get the message now, the opportunity is past," said Bill Ewing, executive director of the food bank.
NEWS
November 25, 2005
The Maryland Food Bank, an organization that feeds more than 45,000 state residents each week, was awarded $300,000 in federal funds to complete the construction of a central food warehouse in Halethorpe. The funding will enable the food bank to finish improvements to the Halethorpe building, which was purchased two years ago, said Susan Sullam, a spokeswoman for Rep. Benjamin L. Cardin, who announced the funding last week. "This appropriation is a key factor in finishing the building we purchased two years ago," Bill Ewing, executive director of the Maryland Food Bank, said in a statement.
NEWS
By MARY GAIL HARE and MARY GAIL HARE,SUN REPORTER | November 8, 2005
With Congress set to consider cuts in food stamps, heating oil prices escalating and prospective donors barraged by crises around the world, the director of Maryland Food Bank said he has never been more apprehensive about the onset of winter. "People will have to decide between heating their homes, buying gas to get to work at a minimum wage job and food," said Bill Ewing, who for 26 years as director has been fighting hunger. To help more than 45,000 Marylanders - about half of them children - who rely on emergency food programs each week, the food bank kicked off the Baltimore area's largest one-day food drive at a Westminster grocery store yesterday.
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