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NEWS
November 18, 2011
There are two sides to every dispute. Next time Gov. Martin O'Malley has the sudden desire to bully the environmental law clinic at the University of Maryland, he ought to keep that in mind. Perhaps if he or his staff had bothered to talk to students at the clinic, he would not have written his odious letter to Maryland School of Law Dean Phoebe A. Haddon this week. It's hard to say what's more shocking - that the governor, a lawyer himself, would attempt to interfere with ongoing civil litigation (much less without ever talking to the plaintiffs or their lawyers to get their side of the story)
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NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2011
Maryland wants to buy electricity generated from animal waste, the governor's office announced Thursday. As part of the Clean Bay Power project, the state is requesting proposals from potential energy suppliers who have the ability to generate up to 10 megawatts of electricity from poultry litter or livestock droppings - or any other kind of animal waste, according to a statement from Gov. Martin O'Malley's office. Providers must also be directly connected to the regional grid.
NEWS
By Carole Morison | October 12, 2011
Within the poultry industry, company dealings with the farmers they contract with have been one-sided for at least the past 20 years. It's been a long, hard battle for contract farmers to try to gain any fairness in that relationship; I can't count the times in those 20 years that I've traveled to Washington, D.C. to speak with our illustrious politicians about the issue. The U.S. Department of Agriculture's Grain Inspection Packers and Stockyards Administration (GIPSA) has the authority to write and publish rules to protect farmers from unfair and/or deceptive practices.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | July 26, 2011
An affiliate of a South Korean poultry firm was the winning bidder in a bankruptcy auction for the assets of Allen Family Foods, a Delaware company that employs hundreds on Maryland's Eastern Shore. Richard A. Robinson, an attorney representing Harim USA Ltd., the Delaware arm of Harim Holdings Co. Ltd., said the company submitted the highest bid for what amounted to nearly all of Allen's assets. The auction on Monday lasted about 12 hours, he said. The acquisition is contingent on approval from a bankruptcy judge.
NEWS
July 5, 2011
Whenever The Sun does an article on the myriad of problems with huge chicken farms ( "Big chicken: downsized," July 5), you never mention one of the most glaring problems: that of animal cruelty, millions of birds crammed into tiny cages from birth till death never seeing the light of day or experiencing the joy of smelling clean fresh air while walking around a barnyard. More and more people are demanding humane (and healthier) ways to raise our food as evidenced by purchasing decisions at the grocery store.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2011
On Maryland's Eastern Shore, everything leads back to chickens. The poultry industry is the largest piece of a key sector of the local economy — agriculture — and its reach is broad: from the truckers who move products and the many farmers who grow corn for chicken feed to the corner stores and other businesses that rely on customers' income. Any hint of disruption to that economic ecosystem makes people nervous. And these days, it's more than that. The bankruptcy filing this month of Allen Family Foods, a Seaford, Del., poultry firm that provides direct employment to hundreds on the Maryland Shore, has left many more here worried about their future.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | November 29, 2010
The Humane Society of the United States filed a class action lawsuit Monday in New Jersey against Maryland-based Perdue Farms, accusing the nation's third-largest poultry producer of falsely advertising its chickens as "humanely raised. " The suit was brought on behalf of a New Jersey woman who bought chicken at a BJ's Wholesale Club bearing the Harvestland label, a trade name used by Perdue for birds raised in Kentucky and marketed as "purely all-natural" and "humanely raised. " The suit alleges that the poultry producer's marketing violates New Jersey's consumer fraud law. The complaint seeks unspecified compensatory and punitive damages against Perdue, as well as an injunction barring it from making claims that it treats its birds humanely.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | November 11, 2010
Scientists have found more intersex fish in Maryland, this time on the Eastern Shore, and their research suggests one possible source of the gender-bending condition could be the poultry manure that is widely used there to fertilize croplands. Six lakes and ponds on the Delmarva Peninsula sampled over the past two years have yielded male largemouth bass carrying eggs, according to University of Maryland scientists. Those are the first intersex fish reported there, though researchers found the condition several years ago in smallmouth bass in the Potomac and its tributaries, and recently found it in smallmouth bass in the Susquehanna.
NEWS
August 23, 2010
Farming, according to President Harry S. Truman, a man familiar with rural life, depended on "good manure. " When Mr. Truman's wife Bess was asked why the president couldn't use the more delicate word "fertilizer," she replied that it had taken her 25 years to get him to say "manure. " Whatever it is called — litter, droppings, excreta — it is a major factor in chicken farming, as anyone who has been caught downwind of a chicken house can attest. Maryland produces nearly 300 million broilers per year, and a byproduct of that process is an estimated 400,000 pounds of what the industry refers to as "chicken litter.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | July 19, 2010
When Carole Morison got into poultry farming 23 years ago, she and her husband built chicken houses on their Pocomoke farm to specifications set by their biggest customer — Perdue Inc. — and made upgrades the industry giant required over the years. That relationship abruptly ended two years ago, when Morison refused to spend $150,000 on a permanent enclosure requested by Salisbury-based Perdue, which in her view would be too costly and unhealthy for the chickens. Perdue subsequently dropped Morison as a grower.
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