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BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | February 25, 1999
Perdue Farms Inc., the giant Salisbury-based chicken processor, has teamed with a small Missouri-based company to build the first Eastern Shore factory that will convert chicken manure into pelletized fertilizer.The $6 million project, which could receive funding from the state, is designed to help rid the Delmarva Peninsula of excess poultry litter in an environmentally friendly manner.In announcing the initiative, James A. Perdue, chairman of the nation's third-largest poultry processor, said that "both poultry and crop producers are faced with increasing environmental mandates on farming; our goal is to help keep farming viable on the Delmarva Peninsula."
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NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | July 27, 2014
The project seemed simple enough - build a waste-to-energy plant on the Eastern Shore fueled by poultry manure, keeping it from flushing into and polluting the bay, while creating green jobs and boosting Maryland's fledgling renewable energy industry But 18 months after it was heralded by Gov. Martin O'Malley, the $75 million project has been stymied after prospective sites and a potential partnership fell through. Now state officials are weighing giving Green Planet Power Solutions, the California-based company chosen to build the 13.4-megawatt plant, a nearly $35 million subsidy on top of what the state previously agreed to pay for its power.
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BUSINESS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | March 12, 1999
The state Department of Agriculture announced a pilot project yesterday that will allow Maryland farmers to manage the phosphorus-based nutrients in their crop soil.The four-year project will receive $1.5 million in annual funding from the state and the five poultry companies on the Eastern Shore, and permit farmers with excess poultry litter to transport it to farmers needing more.Poultry litter is chicken manure mixed with wood shavings. It contains more phosphorus than other fertilizers, and overloading cropland with phosphorus could cause long-term land or water-quality problems, said Norm Astle, the project coordinator.
NEWS
January 6, 2012
There is no doubt who actually represents the 1 percent in the case Farrell Keough describes in his recent letter to the editor ("UMD law clinic sues on behalf of the 1 percent," Dec. 30). With more than $4.5 billion in revenue, Perdue Farms is one of the largest chicken and turkey producers in the world, processing and packing more than 3 billion pounds of poultry a year thanks to some 2,200 contracted poultry producers in about 15 states. Despite the benefit of these immense revenues, Perdue claims it bears no responsibility for the waste produced by the chickens it sells; instead, it takes the chickens, makes a profit, and tries to leave the growers with the mess.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | April 2, 2004
A University of Maryland researcher says new regulations that restrict the use of poultry litter as fertilizer on the Eastern Shore might damage Chesapeake Bay water quality rather than improve it. Kenneth W. Staver, an agricultural engineer, found in a $200,000 study that if poultry farmers clustered on the lower Eastern Shore are forced to send poultry litter to other areas, it could increase runoff of harmful nutrients. The Upper Eastern Shore would be a likely destination for the poultry litter, but the area's hilly terrain and less porous soils pose a problem.
NEWS
January 1, 2001
CAN electric deregulation lead to consumer choice for chicken power? At least three companies in the Delmarva region have plans to convert unwanted chicken manure and bedding into fuel to run power generators. They hope to sell their electricity to buyers interested in cleaner-energy alternatives to fossil fuels. Environmental appeal alone won't be enough for these commercial enterprises. Power from these new technology generators costs more than three times that produced by a coal-fired plant.
NEWS
By Donna Hurlock | October 26, 1997
AS IF THERE were not enough reasons to leave meat off my plate. Meat-based diets have already been clearly linked to heart disease, high blood pressure, diabetes and cancer, to name a few.Now, the September-October issue of Preventive Medicine relates a frightening and dangerous practice carried out by meat producers across the United States: the use of manure, usually from chickens, as livestock feed. This unsavory practice is surprisingly common. In Arkansas alone, 2.6 million pounds of chicken doo-doo become breakfast for beef cattle every year.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,tim.wheeler@baltsun.com | December 23, 2009
A state inspection has determined that the mound on a Berlin chicken farm that environmental groups said was polluting a nearby waterway is treated sewage sludge rather than poultry manure. Maryland Department of the Environment spokesman Jay Apperson e-mailed Tuesday that an inspector found the pile on the Hudson farm was "Class A biosolid," a form of sewage sludge that has been treated to kill harmful bacteria and is only lightly regulated by the state. Jim Parsons, deputy chief of public utilities for Ocean City, said Tuesday that his agency had delivered a load of "biosolids" from Ocean City's wastewater treatment plant to Alan Hudson's farm in August.
NEWS
By EMMA VAUGHN and EMMA VAUGHN,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 5, 2005
WASHINGTON -- In response to the threat of mad cow disease, the Food and Drug Administration proposed yesterday banning the use of certain potentially infectious cattle parts in animal feed, but the agency brushed aside other safety measures it had appeared to endorse last year. The new rules, to take effect early next year, are expected to reduce the risk of infection by 90 percent, said Stephen F. Sundlof, director of the FDA's Center for Veterinary Medicine. Mad cow disease, or bovine spongiform encephalopathy, is believed to be caused by abnormal proteins, known as prions, found in brain and nerve tissue.
NEWS
December 16, 2010
At six weeks of age, the average chicken produces about 5 ounces of waste each day. That may not seem like much, but multiply it by 80,000, which is how many birds may be found in a single commercial chicken house, and it's ankle-deep in short order. For most farmers this has been regarded as a prized asset, not a problem. Poultry litter is periodically spread on fields to fertilize crops and spare farmers the expense of buying expensive commercial fertilizers. It's the proverbial cycle of life.
NEWS
December 16, 2010
At six weeks of age, the average chicken produces about 5 ounces of waste each day. That may not seem like much, but multiply it by 80,000, which is how many birds may be found in a single commercial chicken house, and it's ankle-deep in short order. For most farmers this has been regarded as a prized asset, not a problem. Poultry litter is periodically spread on fields to fertilize crops and spare farmers the expense of buying expensive commercial fertilizers. It's the proverbial cycle of life.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,tim.wheeler@baltsun.com | December 23, 2009
A state inspection has determined that the mound on a Berlin chicken farm that environmental groups said was polluting a nearby waterway is treated sewage sludge rather than poultry manure. Maryland Department of the Environment spokesman Jay Apperson e-mailed Tuesday that an inspector found the pile on the Hudson farm was "Class A biosolid," a form of sewage sludge that has been treated to kill harmful bacteria and is only lightly regulated by the state. Jim Parsons, deputy chief of public utilities for Ocean City, said Tuesday that his agency had delivered a load of "biosolids" from Ocean City's wastewater treatment plant to Alan Hudson's farm in August.
NEWS
By EMMA VAUGHN and EMMA VAUGHN,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 5, 2005
WASHINGTON -- In response to the threat of mad cow disease, the Food and Drug Administration proposed yesterday banning the use of certain potentially infectious cattle parts in animal feed, but the agency brushed aside other safety measures it had appeared to endorse last year. The new rules, to take effect early next year, are expected to reduce the risk of infection by 90 percent, said Stephen F. Sundlof, director of the FDA's Center for Veterinary Medicine. Mad cow disease, or bovine spongiform encephalopathy, is believed to be caused by abnormal proteins, known as prions, found in brain and nerve tissue.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | April 2, 2004
A University of Maryland researcher says new regulations that restrict the use of poultry litter as fertilizer on the Eastern Shore might damage Chesapeake Bay water quality rather than improve it. Kenneth W. Staver, an agricultural engineer, found in a $200,000 study that if poultry farmers clustered on the lower Eastern Shore are forced to send poultry litter to other areas, it could increase runoff of harmful nutrients. The Upper Eastern Shore would be a likely destination for the poultry litter, but the area's hilly terrain and less porous soils pose a problem.
NEWS
January 1, 2001
CAN electric deregulation lead to consumer choice for chicken power? At least three companies in the Delmarva region have plans to convert unwanted chicken manure and bedding into fuel to run power generators. They hope to sell their electricity to buyers interested in cleaner-energy alternatives to fossil fuels. Environmental appeal alone won't be enough for these commercial enterprises. Power from these new technology generators costs more than three times that produced by a coal-fired plant.
BUSINESS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | March 12, 1999
The state Department of Agriculture announced a pilot project yesterday that will allow Maryland farmers to manage the phosphorus-based nutrients in their crop soil.The four-year project will receive $1.5 million in annual funding from the state and the five poultry companies on the Eastern Shore, and permit farmers with excess poultry litter to transport it to farmers needing more.Poultry litter is chicken manure mixed with wood shavings. It contains more phosphorus than other fertilizers, and overloading cropland with phosphorus could cause long-term land or water-quality problems, said Norm Astle, the project coordinator.
NEWS
January 6, 2012
There is no doubt who actually represents the 1 percent in the case Farrell Keough describes in his recent letter to the editor ("UMD law clinic sues on behalf of the 1 percent," Dec. 30). With more than $4.5 billion in revenue, Perdue Farms is one of the largest chicken and turkey producers in the world, processing and packing more than 3 billion pounds of poultry a year thanks to some 2,200 contracted poultry producers in about 15 states. Despite the benefit of these immense revenues, Perdue claims it bears no responsibility for the waste produced by the chickens it sells; instead, it takes the chickens, makes a profit, and tries to leave the growers with the mess.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | February 25, 1999
Perdue Farms Inc., the giant Salisbury-based chicken processor, has teamed with a small Missouri-based company to build the first Eastern Shore factory that will convert chicken manure into pelletized fertilizer.The $6 million project, which could receive funding from the state, is designed to help rid the Delmarva Peninsula of excess poultry litter in an environmentally friendly manner.In announcing the initiative, James A. Perdue, chairman of the nation's third-largest poultry processor, said that "both poultry and crop producers are faced with increasing environmental mandates on farming; our goal is to help keep farming viable on the Delmarva Peninsula."
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