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NEWS
May 17, 2012
According to Wicomico County Executive Richard M. Pollitt Jr. ("So what if O'Malley emails with Perdue lawyer," May 13), "[n]ot only is our entire region and state helped by the economics of the chicken industry, but so is our environment. " How could he possibly arrive at that conclusion? The data tells quite a different story. Maryland crop and livestock production combined has constituted about 0.35 percent of the state's Gross Domestic Product for the past decade, according to the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis at the Commerce Department.
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NEWS
September 22, 2014
Last week, Jim Perdue spoke at a Maryland Chamber of Commerce event to complain about the regulatory environment in the state where his company roosts. "The problem is, we have no seat at the table in Maryland," the Perdue Farms chairman said, according to the Baltimore Business Journal. "Even if we have an onerous thing that happens in Virginia or Delaware, we can sit at the table and at least express our opinion. " Wow. Just wow. No doubt there are a lot of corporate CEOs out there who are nodding their heads in agreement at Mr. Perdue's chirping.
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BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2011
On Maryland's Eastern Shore, everything leads back to chickens. The poultry industry is the largest piece of a key sector of the local economy — agriculture — and its reach is broad: from the truckers who move products and the many farmers who grow corn for chicken feed to the corner stores and other businesses that rely on customers' income. Any hint of disruption to that economic ecosystem makes people nervous. And these days, it's more than that. The bankruptcy filing this month of Allen Family Foods, a Seaford, Del., poultry firm that provides direct employment to hundreds on the Maryland Shore, has left many more here worried about their future.
NEWS
July 28, 2014
If all went as planned, Gov. Martin O'Malley spent this past weekend in Iowa, his second trip to the state in a month, which puts him about two visits ahead of former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton this year. His purpose is hardly a secret as he's considered a likely Democratic candidate, albeit a relatively unknown one, for a 2016 presidential run. Conventional wisdom is that candidates in Iowa say nice things about agriculture. One of the big controversies involving this year's race for a U.S. Senate seat from the Hawkeye state, for instance, was whether the Democratic candidate, Rep. Bruce Braley, threatened a lawsuit when some of his neighbor's organically-raised chickens wandered into his yard.
FEATURES
By William Thompson and William Thompson,Eastern Shore Bureau of The Sun | June 18, 1994
Karen Davis wants to change the way consumers see poultry -- not as fried nuggets or sauce-covered entrees, but as intelligent and lovable creatures.Pulling hen's teeth might be easier for the Montgomery County woman, founder and president of a small animal advocacy group, United Poultry Concerns Inc.Since 1990, when Ms. Davis formed her nonprofit group, chicken and turkey slaughter in the United States has risen nearly 4 billion pounds annually to almost...
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Dennis O'Brien and Frank D. Roylance and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Douglas M. Birch contributed to this article | October 29, 1997
Nine major poultry producers told the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency yesterday that they are moving on their own to reduce the amount of bird waste that reaches the nation's rivers and streams.Invited to a meeting at the EPA's Region III headquarters in Philadelphia, poultry officials reportedly told federal regulators that industry initiatives will help clean up the water without the need for government requirements that would be more onerous."We're obviously just as concerned as anyone about pollution," said David Wiggins, president of Pennsylvania-based Empire Kosher Poultry Inc.Wiggins said last night that he had not been briefed by the environmental engineer who represented his company at the session.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2013
Maryland officials pulled back a proposed regulation Monday aimed at reducing farm runoff polluting the Chesapeake Bay after chicken growers warned it could cripple the state's lucrative poultry industry if imposed now. The state Department of Agriculture announced it had withdrawn its request to make immediate changes to rules governing where farmers may use chicken manure to fertilize their crops, two days before a scheduled legislative hearing...
BUSINESS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Evening Sun Staff | November 26, 1991
MPF Inc., an Aberdeen firm that plans to develop a fish growing and marketing plan similar to that of the state's poultry industry, will be the first recipient of financial assistance from the new Maryland Seafood and Aquaculture Loan Fund.MPF, which will be known as Maryland Pride Farms Inc. once the loan transaction is complete, will receive a loan and line of credit valued at $250,000.MPF President Douglas Burdette started an aquaculture farm in 1976. He later sold it to Towsend Inc., one of the largest poultry processors on the Delmarva Peninsula.
NEWS
By Douglas M. Birch and Timothy B. Wheeler and Douglas M. Birch and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | October 10, 1997
CHESTERTOWN -- The Eastern Shore's poultry industry sought yesterday to block any new state regulations, pledging to reduce the impact of chicken manure on the Chesapeake Bay while denying that manure has nourished a fish-killing microbe in bay waters."
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | June 24, 2003
SALISBURY - Declaring that the Maryland poultry industry's "time in the desert is over," Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. introduced a task force yesterday that he said will help ensure economic stability for the Eastern Shore's chicken business. Ehrlich, who campaigned last year promising to "give farmers a seat at the table" when decisions are made, vowed yesterday to cooperate with what he called mainstream environmental groups. He acknowledged, however, that organizations such as the Chesapeake Bay Foundation were not included on the new task force and were not consulted about its makeup.
NEWS
June 19, 2014
Regarding the recent article, "Phosphorus reduction in bay losing steam in places " (June 15), it is important to note that legislation addressing the issues exposed has already been drafted. Farmers are often attacked for problems that stem beyond their control. The corporations that create (and monopolize) the massive poultry industry in Maryland must be held accountable for the pollution of our Chesapeake Bay. These large companies not only own the birds raised at many of the farms in question but they also leave the responsibility of the waste to their own contract farmers.
NEWS
March 13, 2014
On reading Wenonah Hauter and Julie Gouldener's commentary on Maryland's poultry industry, I kept waiting for them to cite the hideous cruelty to animals that is inherent in confined animal feeding operations ( "Why is O'Malley giving poultry polluters a free ride?" March 7). But it never came. I do not understand how one can write an article about the polluting agribusiness farms and leave out that part. Billions of chickens have lived torturous lives of misery on Maryland's Eastern Shore "farms," and at least mentioning that in the article would have garnered the writers a lot more support.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | March 10, 2014
Key senators have put language in the state budget bill that would stall Maryland's efforts to limit one of the Chesapeake Bay's main pollutants, phosphorus. The amendment by the Budget & Taxation Committee would prohibit the state from issuing new regulations on phosphorus, pending the results of an economic impact study. And when that is done, the committee would have 45 days for review and to recommend further action. Sen. James N. Mathias Jr., an Eastern Shore Democrat who sought the budget restriction, says he wants to shield the state's farmers and the poultry industry from potentially very costly and disruptive regulations.
NEWS
February 23, 2014
Once again, Gov. Martin O'Malley has tried to show that he can be a player on the national stage and a potential presidential candidate. At a recent "Taste of Maryland" dinner, Mr. O'Malley tried to show Republican voters that he can move to the right by evoking memories of President George H.W. Bush's "read my lips" promise not to raise taxes and by threatening to veto the Poultry Fair Share Act, which would require large poultry producers to help...
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | February 12, 2014
Even though the " Poultry Fair Share Act " stands no chance of becoming law, the sponsor of the controversial bill to tax Maryland's chickens refuses to give up, saying he wants to have a public discussion on who should pay to control polluted farm runoff fouling the Cheapeake Bay. Sen. Richard S. Madaleno Jr. said Wednesday that despite a veto threat from Gov. Martin O'Malley and the withdrawal of a companion House bill, he doesn't plan...
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | February 3, 2014
The U.S. Senate is poised to give final approval Tuesday to a nearly $1 trillion bill that would dictate the nation's agriculture policy for the next five years, reduce how much taxpayers spend on food stamps and alter conservation programs for the Chesapeake Bay. Though debate over the farm bill has not been as publicly rancorous as the recent budget battles in Washington, the farm bill nevertheless profoundly affects American ...
BUSINESS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | March 12, 1999
The state Department of Agriculture announced a pilot project yesterday that will allow Maryland farmers to manage the phosphorus-based nutrients in their crop soil.The four-year project will receive $1.5 million in annual funding from the state and the five poultry companies on the Eastern Shore, and permit farmers with excess poultry litter to transport it to farmers needing more.Poultry litter is chicken manure mixed with wood shavings. It contains more phosphorus than other fertilizers, and overloading cropland with phosphorus could cause long-term land or water-quality problems, said Norm Astle, the project coordinator.
NEWS
By Carole Morison | October 12, 2011
Within the poultry industry, company dealings with the farmers they contract with have been one-sided for at least the past 20 years. It's been a long, hard battle for contract farmers to try to gain any fairness in that relationship; I can't count the times in those 20 years that I've traveled to Washington, D.C. to speak with our illustrious politicians about the issue. The U.S. Department of Agriculture's Grain Inspection Packers and Stockyards Administration (GIPSA) has the authority to write and publish rules to protect farmers from unfair and/or deceptive practices.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | October 22, 2013
A new analysis of the nation's farm animal industry finds almost no reforms have been made in the five years since a broad-based commission called for sweeping changes to address concerns about food safety, animal welfare and the environmental impacts of modern poultry and livestock production. The report released Tuesday by the Johns Hopkins University Center for a Livable Future says that the Obama administration and Congress both have failed to act on the recommendations of the Pew Commission on Industrial Farm Animal Production . Indeed, except for a few isolated regulatory actions, policy makers have only exacerbated the problems highlighted in the commission's 2008 report, according to Bob Martin, executive director of the Pew panel.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2013
Maryland officials pulled back a proposed regulation Monday aimed at reducing farm runoff polluting the Chesapeake Bay after chicken growers warned it could cripple the state's lucrative poultry industry if imposed now. The state Department of Agriculture announced it had withdrawn its request to make immediate changes to rules governing where farmers may use chicken manure to fertilize their crops, two days before a scheduled legislative hearing...
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