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NEWS
August 26, 2013
For those who missed it, the latest news in Towson is that the Baltimore County Council will soon take up legislation to consider whether more people ought to be allowed to keep chickens in their backyards. The bill doesn't actually make a decision on whether this should happen but merely calls for a review of current regulations. In other words, county leaders are going to have to decide: What comes first, the chickens or the regs? Sorry about that. But the pun-sensitive may want to stop reading at this point and not get their feathers in a ruffle over what is coming next.
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NEWS
July 28, 2014
If all went as planned, Gov. Martin O'Malley spent this past weekend in Iowa, his second trip to the state in a month, which puts him about two visits ahead of former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton this year. His purpose is hardly a secret as he's considered a likely Democratic candidate, albeit a relatively unknown one, for a 2016 presidential run. Conventional wisdom is that candidates in Iowa say nice things about agriculture. One of the big controversies involving this year's race for a U.S. Senate seat from the Hawkeye state, for instance, was whether the Democratic candidate, Rep. Bruce Braley, threatened a lawsuit when some of his neighbor's organically-raised chickens wandered into his yard.
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NEWS
January 6, 2012
There is no doubt who actually represents the 1 percent in the case Farrell Keough describes in his recent letter to the editor ("UMD law clinic sues on behalf of the 1 percent," Dec. 30). With more than $4.5 billion in revenue, Perdue Farms is one of the largest chicken and turkey producers in the world, processing and packing more than 3 billion pounds of poultry a year thanks to some 2,200 contracted poultry producers in about 15 states. Despite the benefit of these immense revenues, Perdue claims it bears no responsibility for the waste produced by the chickens it sells; instead, it takes the chickens, makes a profit, and tries to leave the growers with the mess.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | July 27, 2014
The project seemed simple enough - build a waste-to-energy plant on the Eastern Shore fueled by poultry manure, keeping it from flushing into and polluting the bay, while creating green jobs and boosting Maryland's fledgling renewable energy industry But 18 months after it was heralded by Gov. Martin O'Malley, the $75 million project has been stymied after prospective sites and a potential partnership fell through. Now state officials are weighing giving Green Planet Power Solutions, the California-based company chosen to build the 13.4-megawatt plant, a nearly $35 million subsidy on top of what the state previously agreed to pay for its power.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | October 24, 2012
Testimony wrapped up Wednesday in the federal court trial of a lawsuit accusing an Eastern Shore poultry farm and Perdue of polluting a Chesapeake Bay tributary, but a ruling isn't likely until later this year. After 10 days of hearing witnesses and legal arguments, U.S. District Court Judge William M. Nickerson directed lawyers for the Waterkeeper Alliance, Berlin farmers Alan and Kristin Hudson and the Sallisbury-based poultry company to submit post-trial statements by Nov. 14, with responses due a week later.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | December 8, 2012
Federal workers' unions and food safety groups have joined to oppose new rules proposed by the Department of Agriculture to streamline federal poultry inspections. The USDA's Food Safety and Inspection Service says the rules would "modernize" inspections of young chickens and turkeys, saving money for businesses and taxpayers while allowing inspectors to focus on the areas of poultry production that pose the greatest risk to food safety. The new inspection system grew out of a pilot program that began in the 1990s under President Bill Clinton.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | April 5, 2012
Researchers report that they have found evidence of banned antibiotics in poultry byproducts, suggesting that growers are evading a 2005 prohibition on their use in treating chickens and turkeys. Scientists at Johns Hopkins' Bloomberg School of Public Health and at Arizona State University detected fluoroquinolones, broad-spectrum antibiotics used to treat bacterial infections in people, as well as otherover-the-counter drugs and residues in feather meal, a common additive to chicken, swine, cattle and fish feed.  The Food and Drug Administration banned the use of fluoroquinolones in poultry production in 2005 amid concern about the spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria.  But in a study published in Environmental Science & Technology , the two schools' researchers report they found the banned drugs in 8 of 12 samples of feather meal collected from six states and China.
FEATURES
June 12, 1994
The 1994 Delmarva Chicken Festival will take place June 17-18 at Delaware State University in Dover, Del. The festival features a home and trade show, arts and crafts, an exhibit on the history of poultry, a chicken-cooking contest, carnival rides and games. Hours are 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Friday; 10 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. Saturday. Admission to the festival and the Delaware Agricultural Museum Village is free of charge. Free shuttle service will operate between the two sites. Call (800) 233-KENT or (302)
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | October 22, 2013
A new analysis of the nation's farm animal industry finds almost no reforms have been made in the five years since a broad-based commission called for sweeping changes to address concerns about food safety, animal welfare and the environmental impacts of modern poultry and livestock production. The report released Tuesday by the Johns Hopkins University Center for a Livable Future says that the Obama administration and Congress both have failed to act on the recommendations of the Pew Commission on Industrial Farm Animal Production . Indeed, except for a few isolated regulatory actions, policy makers have only exacerbated the problems highlighted in the commission's 2008 report, according to Bob Martin, executive director of the Pew panel.
NEWS
By Brent Jones | brent.jones@baltsun.com | January 15, 2010
A proposed settlement that could net consumers $5 million worth of refunds and coupons from the nation's largest poultry producer moved one step closer to fruition Friday when a federal judge -- albeit with reservations -- signed off on the preliminary agreement. Judge Richard D. Bennett repeatedly expressed concerns about the $3 million plaintiffs attorneys' fees and court costs that could be paid by Tyson Foods under the terms of the settlement. Bennett said he would be hard-pressed to sign off on what he called such a disproportionate scale, with the plaintiffs' counsel set to get about 37.5 percent of the overall total, while thousands of consumers net refunds capped at $50. Several consumer lawsuits were filed across the country in 2008, and later consolidated in Baltimore, accusing Tyson of lying about the drugs that go into its birds, with the company marketing its poultry as raised without antibiotics.
NEWS
March 13, 2014
On reading Wenonah Hauter and Julie Gouldener's commentary on Maryland's poultry industry, I kept waiting for them to cite the hideous cruelty to animals that is inherent in confined animal feeding operations ( "Why is O'Malley giving poultry polluters a free ride?" March 7). But it never came. I do not understand how one can write an article about the polluting agribusiness farms and leave out that part. Billions of chickens have lived torturous lives of misery on Maryland's Eastern Shore "farms," and at least mentioning that in the article would have garnered the writers a lot more support.
NEWS
By Wenonah Hauter and Julie Gouldener | March 7, 2014
We have taxed nearly every Marylander to pay for significant nutrient removal at wastewater treatment plants through the Chesapeake Bay Restoration Fee, known as the flush tax, amounting to $60 per year for each household. Gov. Martin O'Malley also supported the so-called "rain tax" to manage urban storm water pollution. But when it comes to agriculture, the polluter-pays concept is discarded, and agriculture is instead offered hundreds of millions of taxpayer dollars to do what it ought to be already doing to reduce pollution runoff.
NEWS
February 21, 2014
I write to applaud the resilience of State Sen. Richard S. Madaleno Jr. in sponsoring the Poultry Fair Share Act ( "Chicken tax sponsor refuses to quit," Feb. 12). As a resident and business owner in Baltimore City, I and my neighbors are already contributing to help sustain the health of the Chesapeake Bay (through measures like the Flush Tax ). The Poultry Fair Share Act is meant to share the cost with the one entity that benefits most from the Eastern Shore, and that's the large chicken companies.
NEWS
February 17, 2014
On average, about 2,600 bills are introduced during a 90-day General Assembly session, so governors rarely have much to say about 99 percent of them, at least not until they've at least had a public hearing or perhaps even a committee vote. But that wasn't the case with Senate Bill 725, which apparently is so distasteful that Gov. Martin O'Malley promised to veto it within days of its mere introduction in Annapolis. Not only did he threaten to veto it, but Mr. O'Malley even publicly used that phrase offered by President George H. W. Bush to "read my lips" that he wouldn't approve the new tax (apparently ignoring the irony of a Democratic governor quoting a Republican president on a promise he so infamously reversed course on)
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | February 12, 2014
Even though the " Poultry Fair Share Act " stands no chance of becoming law, the sponsor of the controversial bill to tax Maryland's chickens refuses to give up, saying he wants to have a public discussion on who should pay to control polluted farm runoff fouling the Cheapeake Bay. Sen. Richard S. Madaleno Jr. said Wednesday that despite a veto threat from Gov. Martin O'Malley and the withdrawal of a companion House bill, he doesn't plan...
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | February 3, 2014
The U.S. Senate is poised to give final approval Tuesday to a nearly $1 trillion bill that would dictate the nation's agriculture policy for the next five years, reduce how much taxpayers spend on food stamps and alter conservation programs for the Chesapeake Bay. Though debate over the farm bill has not been as publicly rancorous as the recent budget battles in Washington, the farm bill nevertheless profoundly affects American ...
BUSINESS
November 5, 1991
McCormick & Co. announced it has sold its Golden West Foods poultry business, including the plant in Bossier City, La., to Continental Grain Co.The sale price was not disclosed. The sale was closed last Friday, according to Mac Barrett, spokesman for the company.Barrett said the sale was a small transaction and would not impact McCormick's fourth-quarter or year-end results.Located in Bedford, Va., Golden West Foods, a wholly owned subsidiary of McCormick, is to continue to manufacture and distribute frozen breaded vegetable products under the brand name, Golden West.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | December 26, 1994
LOS ANGELES -- In a scientific coup that appears to have tracked down the Adam and Eve of poultry, researchers at the City of Hope Medical Center have found that the modern poultry industry got its start more than 10,000 years ago when a Vietnamese farmer took a pair of red jungle fowl into a hut and began breeding them.All domesticated chickens now grown in the world -- an average of more than 8 billion per year -- are descendants of those unlikely ancestors, which still exist in their ancient form, according to genetic typing results reported this month in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | October 22, 2013
A new analysis of the nation's farm animal industry finds almost no reforms have been made in the five years since a broad-based commission called for sweeping changes to address concerns about food safety, animal welfare and the environmental impacts of modern poultry and livestock production. The report released Tuesday by the Johns Hopkins University Center for a Livable Future says that the Obama administration and Congress both have failed to act on the recommendations of the Pew Commission on Industrial Farm Animal Production . Indeed, except for a few isolated regulatory actions, policy makers have only exacerbated the problems highlighted in the commission's 2008 report, according to Bob Martin, executive director of the Pew panel.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2013
Howard County was Richard Holmes' stage. When the Elkridge resident wasn't performing as Santa Claus at nursing homes, acting with local theater troupes or serving as a Howard historian on a local government access television show, he was displaying his expertise as a poultry enthusiast at county fairs. Mr. Holmes, 81, who passed away Sept. 26, will be remembered at a memorial service in December at Bethany United Methodist Church in Ellicott City, where he attended. Longtime friend Wendy Feaga said Mr. Holmes took part in several drama productions at the church — including one where he entered as Santa Claus on a scooter cart.
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