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NEWS
January 2, 2005
On December 30, 2004, MS POULSON. Visitation Tuesday 2:00 P.M. to 6:00 P.M. at 2140 N. Fulton Avenue. Family will receive friends on Wednesday in the chapel at 12:30 P.M., with funeral to follow at 1:00 P.M.
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NEWS
May 21, 2007
On May 10, 2007 MONTELL AUGUSTUS POULSON, beloved husband of Vicenta Poulson and devoted father of Brenonda Poulson, Monette Poulson, Ching Stoddart, Jose Coceres and Luis Coceres, departed this life following a lengthy illness. He was a well-known jazz bassist for over 50 years in Baltimore, Maryland. Funeral Services will be held at the St. Gabriel Roman Catholic Church, located at 6950 Dogwood Rd in Randallstown, MD 21244, in Baltimore County, on Tuesday, May 22, 2007 at 11 A.M. A Memorial Celebration featuring tributes in words and music will be held at the Morgan Christian Center on the grounds of Morgan State University, located at 4307 Hillen Rd., Baltimore, MD 21239, on Saturday, May 26, 2007 at Noon.
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NEWS
May 21, 2007
On May 10, 2007 MONTELL AUGUSTUS POULSON, beloved husband of Vicenta Poulson and devoted father of Brenonda Poulson, Monette Poulson, Ching Stoddart, Jose Coceres and Luis Coceres, departed this life following a lengthy illness. He was a well-known jazz bassist for over 50 years in Baltimore, Maryland. Funeral Services will be held at the St. Gabriel Roman Catholic Church, located at 6950 Dogwood Rd in Randallstown, MD 21244, in Baltimore County, on Tuesday, May 22, 2007 at 11 A.M. A Memorial Celebration featuring tributes in words and music will be held at the Morgan Christian Center on the grounds of Morgan State University, located at 4307 Hillen Rd., Baltimore, MD 21239, on Saturday, May 26, 2007 at Noon.
NEWS
January 2, 2005
On December 30, 2004, MS POULSON. Visitation Tuesday 2:00 P.M. to 6:00 P.M. at 2140 N. Fulton Avenue. Family will receive friends on Wednesday in the chapel at 12:30 P.M., with funeral to follow at 1:00 P.M.
NEWS
By Donna R. Engle and Donna R. Engle,SUN STAFF | August 21, 1998
The graves of American Methodist Church pioneers that lie in the path of a planned limestone quarry in the Wakefield Valley should be moved, say archaeologists who investigated the tract.The archaeological study of a 126-acre farm on Nicodemus Road, owned in the late 1700s by early Methodist convert Andrew Poulson, is part of the permit application process for Arundel Corp., which wants to mine the property.On the Poulson farm, Robert Strawbridge, founder of American Methodism, preached under a massive oak tree, baptized converts in a stream and led the new church's second "class meeting," a group that grew into a congregation.
NEWS
By Donna R. Engle and Donna R. Engle,SUN STAFF | June 19, 1997
The Maryland Historical Trust is asking the Arundel Corp. to look again for a family cemetery and expand its search for artifacts on a Carroll County farm that played an important role in the history of the American Methodist Church.The Arundel Corp., which wants to open a limestone quarry on the site, has been working with church representatives, preservationists and the historical trust for about nine months to find ways for its planned mining operation to coexist with the site's historic features.
NEWS
By Donna R. Engle and Donna R. Engle,SUN STAFF | October 23, 1998
To pilgrims seeking the roots of the American Methodist Church, a historic farm in Carroll County's rolling, fertile Wakefield Valley holds a treasure: graves of the church's pioneers.To Arundel Corp., the farm offers something more lucrative: the site for a marble quarry.At issue in this peaceful valley, which stretches from Westminster west to Frederick County, is the preservation of one of the sites where American Methodism began two centuries ago -- where an immigrant evangelist preached and baptized converts and where early church members are buried.
NEWS
November 11, 1996
TOO OFTEN, our rich cultural heritage is cherished only after it is threatened with destruction. Such is the case of the Andrew Poulson farm near New Windsor.The property was acquired by the Arundel Corp., which intends to develop a 60-acre limestone quarry at the farm. Actual excavation and development of the surface mining operation is several years, and various stages of government approval, away. But the company's plans have stirred concerns in the Methodist community that the Poulson House, a cemetery and the nearby Strawbridge Shrine might be destroyed in the mining operations.
NEWS
By DONNA R. ENGLE | November 7, 1996
An archaeologist began surveying a Wakefield Valley farm this week for pieces of American Methodist Church history, including the graves of people who nurtured the infant church, which might lie in the path of a planned limestone quarry.National United Methodist Church historians and archivists appealed late last month to the Carroll County government and Arundel Corp., the Sparks-based quarry company that owns the property, to preserve the Andrew Poulson house; the oak tree planted in 1934 to replace the tree under which Robert Strawbridge, a founder of American Methodism, preached; the stream where Strawbridge baptized converts; and the Poulson family cemetery.
NEWS
By Donna R. Engle and Donna R. Engle,SUN STAFF | August 26, 1996
The Arundel Corp.'s plans to open a limestone quarry in Wakefield Valley has local church leaders worried the mining operation will rock the cradle of American Methodism.Arundel representatives have met with state and county officials to discuss mining on a company-owned 126-acre tract on Nicodemus Road, where Robert Strawbridge, founder of American Methodism, preached in the 18th century at the still-standing home of convert Andrew Poulson.Strawbridge also is supposed to have baptized converts in a nearby stream.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Linell Smith and By Linell Smith,Sun Staff | February 9, 2003
Bass player Montell Poulson arrived a bit late -- he had just come in from another gig. Poulson used to play the Royal Theatre in Baltimore and the Howard Theatre in Washington. He roamed the East Coast with the Rivers Chambers Orchestra, playing for "heavy pockets" society events. He played with Eubie. He toured with Billie, Fats and Ethel. However, he began his set last Sunday by acknowledging another bass player seated near the front of the audience. "My mentor's Charlie Harris, who played with Nat King Cole," Poulson said, pointing him out. Then he waved to saxophone player Whit Williams: "I see you back there, too, 'Police Dog!
NEWS
By Donna R. Engle and Donna R. Engle,SUN STAFF | October 23, 1998
To pilgrims seeking the roots of the American Methodist Church, a historic farm in Carroll County's rolling, fertile Wakefield Valley holds a treasure: graves of the church's pioneers.To Arundel Corp., the farm offers something more lucrative: the site for a marble quarry.At issue in this peaceful valley, which stretches from Westminster west to Frederick County, is the preservation of one of the sites where American Methodism began two centuries ago -- where an immigrant evangelist preached and baptized converts and where early church members are buried.
NEWS
By Donna R. Engle and Donna R. Engle,SUN STAFF | August 21, 1998
The graves of American Methodist Church pioneers that lie in the path of a planned limestone quarry in the Wakefield Valley should be moved, say archaeologists who investigated the tract.The archaeological study of a 126-acre farm on Nicodemus Road, owned in the late 1700s by early Methodist convert Andrew Poulson, is part of the permit application process for Arundel Corp., which wants to mine the property.On the Poulson farm, Robert Strawbridge, founder of American Methodism, preached under a massive oak tree, baptized converts in a stream and led the new church's second "class meeting," a group that grew into a congregation.
NEWS
By Donna R. Engle and Donna R. Engle,SUN STAFF | August 21, 1998
The graves of American Methodist Church pioneers that lie in the path of a planned limestone quarry in the Wakefield Valley should be moved, say archaeologists who investigated the tract.The archaeological study of a 126-acre farm on Nicodemus Road, owned in the late 1700s by early Methodist convert Andrew Poulson, is part of the permit application process for Arundel Corp., which wants to mine the property.On the Poulson farm, Robert Strawbridge, founder of American Methodism, preached under a massive oak tree, baptized converts in a stream and led the new church's second "class meeting," a group that grew into a congregation.
NEWS
By Donna R. Engle and Donna R. Engle,SUN STAFF | February 1, 1998
Arundel Corp., which plans to open a limestone quarry within two years on a Wakefield Valley farm that cradled American Methodism, has promised to move the remains of early converts whose graves are believed to lie in the path of the proposed gravel pit.Company representatives also assured the quarry's prospective neighbors that Arundel will obey state laws restricting noise and requiring the quarry operation to make good on damage to houses or the loss...
NEWS
By Donna R. Engle and Donna R. Engle,SUN STAFF | June 19, 1997
The Maryland Historical Trust is asking the Arundel Corp. to look again for a family cemetery and expand its search for artifacts on a Carroll County farm that played an important role in the history of the American Methodist Church.The Arundel Corp., which wants to open a limestone quarry on the site, has been working with church representatives, preservationists and the historical trust for about nine months to find ways for its planned mining operation to coexist with the site's historic features.
NEWS
By Donna R. Engle and Donna R. Engle,SUN STAFF | August 21, 1998
The graves of American Methodist Church pioneers that lie in the path of a planned limestone quarry in the Wakefield Valley should be moved, say archaeologists who investigated the tract.The archaeological study of a 126-acre farm on Nicodemus Road, owned in the late 1700s by early Methodist convert Andrew Poulson, is part of the permit application process for Arundel Corp., which wants to mine the property.On the Poulson farm, Robert Strawbridge, founder of American Methodism, preached under a massive oak tree, baptized converts in a stream and led the new church's second "class meeting," a group that grew into a congregation.
NEWS
By Keith Paul | July 5, 1991
Macel F. Poulson was watching the news Wednesday night when she saw something that shocked her -- the smiling face of an abandoned 20-month-old boy who had been living in her East Baltimore home until earlier this month.Just last week, Mrs. Poulson had seen Florence M. Marzinske, the boy's mother and her son's girlfriend, and asked her how the child had been doing since the couple moved out.She had no idea that a week earlier young John Steven Marzinske had been abandoned."I asked her about the baby, she said he was fine," said Mrs. Poulson, who had offered to care for the baby before asking Ms. Marzinske and her son, Rick J. Feist, to leave after five months in her home.
NEWS
November 11, 1996
TOO OFTEN, our rich cultural heritage is cherished only after it is threatened with destruction. Such is the case of the Andrew Poulson farm near New Windsor.The property was acquired by the Arundel Corp., which intends to develop a 60-acre limestone quarry at the farm. Actual excavation and development of the surface mining operation is several years, and various stages of government approval, away. But the company's plans have stirred concerns in the Methodist community that the Poulson House, a cemetery and the nearby Strawbridge Shrine might be destroyed in the mining operations.
NEWS
By DONNA R. ENGLE | November 7, 1996
An archaeologist began surveying a Wakefield Valley farm this week for pieces of American Methodist Church history, including the graves of people who nurtured the infant church, which might lie in the path of a planned limestone quarry.National United Methodist Church historians and archivists appealed late last month to the Carroll County government and Arundel Corp., the Sparks-based quarry company that owns the property, to preserve the Andrew Poulson house; the oak tree planted in 1934 to replace the tree under which Robert Strawbridge, a founder of American Methodism, preached; the stream where Strawbridge baptized converts; and the Poulson family cemetery.
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