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Potty Parity

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NEWS
February 3, 1992
After the state dinosaur, can the state cave man be far behind?Some promising auditions were conducted last week when the Senate Judicial Proceedings Committee heard testimony on Gov. William Donald Schaefer's domestic violence bill.The bill, aimed at protecting battered women, would extend from 30 days to one year the period during which a judge could order an abusive spouse out of the home.Aspects of the bill troubled chairman Walter M. Baker, a Cecil County Democrat, and Sen. Frederick C. Malkus, a Dorchester County Democrat.
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NEWS
By Sherrie Ruhl and Sherrie Ruhl,Staff Writer | August 23, 1992
It was a big deal during last year's legislative session, a problem at Oriole Park at Camden Yards and a minor concern at some other public buildings. Now, potty parity has arrived at a Harford County elementary school.More girls bathrooms should be included in the design for a new elementary school because it takes longer for them to fasten and unfasten their "snaps, bows and ties," said school board president Anne Sterling. "Little girls, like adult women, take longer than little boys to get in and out of the bathroom."
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NEWS
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,Annapolis Bureau | March 20, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- As the Gershwin song goes, they all laughed -- at Christopher Columbus, Hershey and his chocolate bar, and the dogged female legislators who wanted to make "potty parity" the law of the land.But with the unanimous approval yesterday of Senate Bill No. 437, known officially as "Public Restrooms -- Number of Sanitary Fixtures," the women might have the last laugh."It was a joke. Everybody laughed and thought it was funny," Sen. Barbara A. Hoffman said of the legislation's history in the General Assembly.
NEWS
April 5, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- In 13 months, Maryland will join the 10 other states with "potty parity" -- requiring equal numbers of women's and men's toilet facilities in public meeting places.The Senate yesterday voted unanimously to agree to the House of Delegates bill on restrooms, sponsored by Del. Sheila E. Hixson, a Montgomery County Democrat.Under the bill, a public meeting place that holds more than 100 people will be required to have an equal number of fixtures for men and women. The law will be tied to construction permits issued after May 1, 1993.
NEWS
April 5, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- In 13 months, Maryland will join the 10 other states with "potty parity" -- requiring equal numbers of women's and men's toilet facilities in public meeting places.The Senate yesterday voted unanimously to agree to the House of Delegates bill on restrooms, sponsored by Del. Sheila E. Hixson, a Montgomery County Democrat.Under the bill, a public meeting place that holds more than 100 people will be required to have an equal number of fixtures for men and women. The law will be tied to construction permits issued after May 1, 1993.
NEWS
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,Annapolis Bureau | March 20, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- As the Gershwin song goes, they all laughed -- at Christopher Columbus, Hershey and his chocolate bar, and the dogged female legislators who wanted to make "potty parity" the law of the land.But with the unanimous approval yesterday of Senate Bill No. 437, known officially as "Public Restrooms -- Number of Sanitary Fixtures," the women might have the last laugh."It was a joke. Everybody laughed and thought it was funny," Sen. Barbara A. Hoffman said of the legislation's history in the General Assembly.
NEWS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Annapolis Bureau | February 15, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- Women have been standing in line for this bill for a long time.The House Economic Matters Committee yesterday overwhelmingly approved legislation that would make "potty parity" in theaters, stadiums, nightclubs, meeting halls, restaurants, museums, churches and other public facilities the law of the land -- or at least the law of Maryland.The bill, sponsored by Del. Sheila E.Hixson, D-Montgomery, would require builders of new public "places of assembly" that hold 100 people or more to provide as many toilets for women as there are toilets and urinals combined for men.The proposed law would only apply to new construction for which a construction permit is issued after May 1, 1993.
NEWS
By From Staff Reports | February 26, 1992
POTTY PARITYHouse votes to require equal number of toiletsThe "potty parity" bill, which requires an equal number of men's and women's toilets in new public places accommodating more than 100 people, got overwhelming final approval from the House of Delegates yesterday.Sponsored by Del. Sheila E. Hixson, D-Montgomery, the measure would require builders of large public facilities to provide as many toilets for women as there are toilets and urinals combined for men."This is an easy bill to joke about, but it's not a joking matter," said Del. Casper R. Taylor Jr., chairman of Economic Matters Committee, which sent the bill to the full House.
NEWS
February 24, 1992
Hand it to veteran lobbyist James J. Doyle Jr., perhaps the only paid persuader in town who can use Maryland's budget problems as a reason to kill a bill that would raise more money for the state.The bill would create a $1 million investment adviser guaranty fund to help pay victims of securities fraud. It would do so by imposing an annual $50 assessment on every registered investment adviser; the assessment could rise if the payout from the fund increases.Here was one of the arguments that Mr. Doyle, who represents IDS Financial Services, used against the bill before the Senate Judicial Proceedings Committee last week:"In a year like this, when the legislature doesn't know how to handle, or what to do with the taxes it does have, or how to raise new ones, this is the worst time to be considering an experiment like this."
NEWS
By THE ANNPOLIS BUREAU STAFF | February 24, 1992
The House of Delegates can be an unruly bunch.It's not uncommon for many of the 141 delegates to be talking privately to one another while a colleague has the floor.Speaker R. Clayton Mitchell Jr. often has to whack his gavel hard to quiet the group down. So hard, in fact, that he has been known to break a gavel or two.Last week the clerks who sit in front of him decided to take precautions against gavel shrapnel. Three donned neon-colored headgear -- possibly inspired by the week's hottest item, a mandatory helmet law for motorcyclists?
NEWS
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,Annapolis Bureau | March 20, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- As the Gershwin song goes, they all laughed -- at Christopher Columbus, Hershey and his chocolate bar, and the dogged female legislators who wanted to make "potty parity" the law of the land.But with the unanimous approval yesterday of Senate Bill No. 437, known officially as "Public Restrooms -- Number of Sanitary Fixtures," the women might have the last laugh."It was a joke. Everybody laughed and thought it was funny," Sen. Barbara A. Hoffman said of the legislation's history in the General Assembly.
NEWS
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,Annapolis Bureau | March 20, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- As the Gershwin song goes, they all laughed -- at Christopher Columbus, Hershey and his chocolate bar, and the dogged female legislators who wanted to make "potty parity" the law of the land.But with the unanimous approval yesterday of Senate Bill No. 437, known officially as "Public Restrooms -- Number of Sanitary Fixtures," the women might have the last laugh."It was a joke. Everybody laughed and thought it was funny," Sen. Barbara A. Hoffman said of the legislation's history in the General Assembly.
NEWS
By From Staff Reports | February 26, 1992
POTTY PARITYHouse votes to require equal number of toiletsThe "potty parity" bill, which requires an equal number of men's and women's toilets in new public places accommodating more than 100 people, got overwhelming final approval from the House of Delegates yesterday.Sponsored by Del. Sheila E. Hixson, D-Montgomery, the measure would require builders of large public facilities to provide as many toilets for women as there are toilets and urinals combined for men."This is an easy bill to joke about, but it's not a joking matter," said Del. Casper R. Taylor Jr., chairman of Economic Matters Committee, which sent the bill to the full House.
NEWS
February 24, 1992
Hand it to veteran lobbyist James J. Doyle Jr., perhaps the only paid persuader in town who can use Maryland's budget problems as a reason to kill a bill that would raise more money for the state.The bill would create a $1 million investment adviser guaranty fund to help pay victims of securities fraud. It would do so by imposing an annual $50 assessment on every registered investment adviser; the assessment could rise if the payout from the fund increases.Here was one of the arguments that Mr. Doyle, who represents IDS Financial Services, used against the bill before the Senate Judicial Proceedings Committee last week:"In a year like this, when the legislature doesn't know how to handle, or what to do with the taxes it does have, or how to raise new ones, this is the worst time to be considering an experiment like this."
NEWS
By THE ANNPOLIS BUREAU STAFF | February 24, 1992
The House of Delegates can be an unruly bunch.It's not uncommon for many of the 141 delegates to be talking privately to one another while a colleague has the floor.Speaker R. Clayton Mitchell Jr. often has to whack his gavel hard to quiet the group down. So hard, in fact, that he has been known to break a gavel or two.Last week the clerks who sit in front of him decided to take precautions against gavel shrapnel. Three donned neon-colored headgear -- possibly inspired by the week's hottest item, a mandatory helmet law for motorcyclists?
NEWS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Annapolis Bureau | February 15, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- Women have been standing in line for this bill for a long time.The House Economic Matters Committee yesterday overwhelmingly approved legislation that would make "potty parity" in theaters, stadiums, nightclubs, meeting halls, restaurants, museums, churches and other public facilities the law of the land -- or at least the law of Maryland.The bill, sponsored by Del. Sheila E.Hixson, D-Montgomery, would require builders of new public "places of assembly" that hold 100 people or more to provide as many toilets for women as there are toilets and urinals combined for men.The proposed law would only apply to new construction for which a construction permit is issued after May 1, 1993.
NEWS
BY THE ANNAPOLIS BUREAU STAFF | February 3, 1992
After the state dinosaur, can the state cave man be far behind?Some promising auditions were conducted last week when the Senate Judicial Proceedings Committee heard testimony on Gov. William Donald Schaefer's domestic violence bill.The bill, aimed at protecting battered women, would extend from 30 days to one year the period during which a judge could order an abusive spouse out of the home.Aspects of the bill troubled chairman Walter M. Baker, a Cecil County Democrat, and Sen. Frederick C. Malkus, a Dorchester County Democrat.
NEWS
By Sherrie Ruhl and Sherrie Ruhl,Staff Writer | August 23, 1992
It was a big deal during last year's legislative session, a problem at Oriole Park at Camden Yards and a minor concern at some other public buildings. Now, potty parity has arrived at a Harford County elementary school.More girls bathrooms should be included in the design for a new elementary school because it takes longer for them to fasten and unfasten their "snaps, bows and ties," said school board president Anne Sterling. "Little girls, like adult women, take longer than little boys to get in and out of the bathroom."
NEWS
BY THE ANNAPOLIS BUREAU STAFF | February 3, 1992
After the state dinosaur, can the state cave man be far behind?Some promising auditions were conducted last week when the Senate Judicial Proceedings Committee heard testimony on Gov. William Donald Schaefer's domestic violence bill.The bill, aimed at protecting battered women, would extend from 30 days to one year the period during which a judge could order an abusive spouse out of the home.Aspects of the bill troubled chairman Walter M. Baker, a Cecil County Democrat, and Sen. Frederick C. Malkus, a Dorchester County Democrat.
NEWS
February 3, 1992
After the state dinosaur, can the state cave man be far behind?Some promising auditions were conducted last week when the Senate Judicial Proceedings Committee heard testimony on Gov. William Donald Schaefer's domestic violence bill.The bill, aimed at protecting battered women, would extend from 30 days to one year the period during which a judge could order an abusive spouse out of the home.Aspects of the bill troubled chairman Walter M. Baker, a Cecil County Democrat, and Sen. Frederick C. Malkus, a Dorchester County Democrat.
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