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Potpie

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NEWS
By ANNETTE GOOCH and ANNETTE GOOCH,UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE | April 11, 1999
A favorite for potlucks and family suppers alike is chicken pie made entirely from scratch. A potpie -- a main-dish pie filled with poultry or meat and vegetables -- takes time to put together but can be prepared in stages, making it ideal for starting the weekend before a busy week. You can simmer the chicken and prepare the filling and pastry up to two days ahead. On the day you assemble the pie, let the filling warm almost to room temperature while you roll out the pastry topping.Chicken PieServes 61 frying chicken (3 1/2 pounds)
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NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | February 23, 2008
When my father turned 90 a few days ago, it seemed appropriate that we honor the occasion with a fitting food request. Joe Kelly wanted oyster potpie, a dish that was once common on a Maryland dinner table, but over the years, has gone the way of stewed tomatoes or corned beef hash. It wasn't easy finding the right recipe. One got tossed out when a cooking step called for white wine or sherry. No. No. No. Thanks to an old Baltimore Gas and Electric Co.
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NEWS
By SAM SESSA and SAM SESSA,SUN REPORTER | October 19, 2005
One way to ward off the chill of autumn is with a hot chicken potpie. Pick the wrong restaurant, and it's more like chicken potluck. These places are some of the city's better options. Sobo Cafe 6-8 W. Cross St. 410-752-1518 HOURS // noon to 4 p.m. and 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. daily Sobo Cafe makes only a number of these pies per night, so call in early to stake a claim. A nearly foot-long slab of crust covers a homey mix of vegetables and chicken in this $11 pie. Chunks of dark andwhite meat (one with a bone still in it)
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,Special to The Sun | January 2, 2008
Betty Mathias of New Windsor was looking for a recipe for an onion casserole that was originally published in the 2006 Old Farmer's Almanac. She said she discarded the old almanac and "out with the old year went a darn good recipe." Fortunately, Linda Lupro of Baltimore held on to her copy of the 2006 almanac and kindly faxed in a copy of the recipe that Mathias was looking for. This recipe involves a lot of chopping. However, if you are careful and don't over-process, you could do most of the prep in the food processor, which would certainly be less laborious.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,Sun Staff | April 26, 2000
A Slippery Potpie recipe was the request of Susan Livingston of Johnstown, Pa., who said she lost this recipe, which her family enjoyed. Laurey Krouse Cappe of Towson responded with a recipe that she said came from "my 80-year-old mother, who got it from her mother, who got it from her mother. I don't know how many more generations this Pennsylvania Dutch recipe goes back." Slippery Potpie Serves 8-10 2 quarts chicken, ham or beef stock 2 cups of meat used to make stock, shredded 1 cup chopped celery 1 medium onion, chopped 1 cup chopped carrot 2-3 peeled and diced potatoes 1 tablespoon parsley flakes 1 teaspoon salt 1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper DOUGH: 3 cups all-purpose flour 1 teaspoon salt 1/4 cup lard or butter (optional)
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | February 23, 2008
When my father turned 90 a few days ago, it seemed appropriate that we honor the occasion with a fitting food request. Joe Kelly wanted oyster potpie, a dish that was once common on a Maryland dinner table, but over the years, has gone the way of stewed tomatoes or corned beef hash. It wasn't easy finding the right recipe. One got tossed out when a cooking step called for white wine or sherry. No. No. No. Thanks to an old Baltimore Gas and Electric Co.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | April 15, 1998
An oyster potpie and a recipe for bark candy offer delicious possibilities.Jane Wilcox of Baltimore wrote: "Please help me find an oyster pot pie. I have searched every cookbook for months and have been unable to find one." Her response came from Carol A. Walls of Laurel, who sent a recipe called Galway oyster potpie. It originally was created by Jackie Stephens of Nashville, Tenn., for the 15th Annual Anniversary Edition National Oyster Cook-Off.Bark candy is what Judy Wilkerson of Edgemont, S.D., wanted -- only she didn't know it. She requested a recipe with a "name unknown."
NEWS
By ELINOR KLIVANS and ELINOR KLIVANS,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 1, 2006
Potpies have long been stars of the comfort-food season. With new toppings as an alternative to the traditional flaky crust, you can lighten their toll on both your waistline and your cooking time. Heaped with moist fillings that bubble under a crisp corn-bread topping or maybe a soft biscuit crust, potpies have a universal appeal. They use readily available ingredients, often make a one-dish meal and can serve a single person or a crowd. Most can be put together at your leisure and baked later in the day, and many can even be frozen, defrosted and popped in the oven to bake.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kathryn Higham and Kathryn Higham,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 2, 1998
Baltimore's SoBo may never be as famous as New York's SoHo, the arty area south of Houston Street, or as trendy as Miami's SoBe, the art-deco jewel of South Beach. But South Baltimore has an appeal of its own, and so does Brent Ludtke's SoBo Cafe, which opened last December in Federal Hill.It's hard not to have an immediate positive response walking into the bright and airy SoBo, with its gauzy curtains, paddle fans and sunflower-colored walls hung with bold artworks. Some are pretty funny, like Phil Wiley's surfing alien who also hangs 10 on the oversized blackboard above the wide stretch of SoBo's wooden bar.That's where the menu, which changes daily, is written in chalk.
FEATURES
By Jacques Kelly | May 6, 2000
Bunches of rhubarb arrived at the Waverly Farmers' Market this past weekend -- a sign that local gardens will soon be overflowing. Stewed rhubarb was a springtime dish on my family's table, but don't think that everyone delighted in it. In fact, there were but a few people who smacked their lips for this sour, slimy stuff. Rhubarb was one of a category of difficult dishes that issued from the kitchen of the Guilford Avenue home where I was born. Each season had its own strange item -- a food that was a very different feed from the standard rib roast of beef, crab cake or spaghetti dinner.
NEWS
By ELINOR KLIVANS and ELINOR KLIVANS,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 1, 2006
Potpies have long been stars of the comfort-food season. With new toppings as an alternative to the traditional flaky crust, you can lighten their toll on both your waistline and your cooking time. Heaped with moist fillings that bubble under a crisp corn-bread topping or maybe a soft biscuit crust, potpies have a universal appeal. They use readily available ingredients, often make a one-dish meal and can serve a single person or a crowd. Most can be put together at your leisure and baked later in the day, and many can even be frozen, defrosted and popped in the oven to bake.
NEWS
By SAM SESSA and SAM SESSA,SUN REPORTER | October 19, 2005
One way to ward off the chill of autumn is with a hot chicken potpie. Pick the wrong restaurant, and it's more like chicken potluck. These places are some of the city's better options. Sobo Cafe 6-8 W. Cross St. 410-752-1518 HOURS // noon to 4 p.m. and 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. daily Sobo Cafe makes only a number of these pies per night, so call in early to stake a claim. A nearly foot-long slab of crust covers a homey mix of vegetables and chicken in this $11 pie. Chunks of dark andwhite meat (one with a bone still in it)
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Sun Staff | January 14, 2004
White chocolate by any other name might still taste as sweet. But starting this month, new federal guidelines will define what white chocolate is. In response to petitions from Hershey Foods and the Chocolate Manufacturers Association of America, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has come up with a new standard for the confection. From now on, products called white chocolate must include cocoa butter, milk solids, milk fat and sweeteners such as sugar or high-fructose corn syrup. The goal is to eliminate consumers' confusion and prevent imposters from using cheaper ingredients such as vegetable fat instead of cocoa butter.
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | January 24, 2001
FOR MOST SUPER Bowl meals, I was happy with something fast and feral. In prior years, I have made big bowls of chili, massive platters of chicken wings and, of course, the ultimate football-fan entrM-ie: a chicken stuffed with an open can of beer and cooked on a barbecue grill. But this year after rooting for the Baltimore Ravens during their surprising and bumpy ride - those early-season games without touchdowns were almost as hard to swallow as weekends without beer - I felt the need to cook something memorable for Sunday's Super Bowl matchup with the New York Giants.
FEATURES
By Jacques Kelly | May 6, 2000
Bunches of rhubarb arrived at the Waverly Farmers' Market this past weekend -- a sign that local gardens will soon be overflowing. Stewed rhubarb was a springtime dish on my family's table, but don't think that everyone delighted in it. In fact, there were but a few people who smacked their lips for this sour, slimy stuff. Rhubarb was one of a category of difficult dishes that issued from the kitchen of the Guilford Avenue home where I was born. Each season had its own strange item -- a food that was a very different feed from the standard rib roast of beef, crab cake or spaghetti dinner.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,Sun Staff | April 26, 2000
A Slippery Potpie recipe was the request of Susan Livingston of Johnstown, Pa., who said she lost this recipe, which her family enjoyed. Laurey Krouse Cappe of Towson responded with a recipe that she said came from "my 80-year-old mother, who got it from her mother, who got it from her mother. I don't know how many more generations this Pennsylvania Dutch recipe goes back." Slippery Potpie Serves 8-10 2 quarts chicken, ham or beef stock 2 cups of meat used to make stock, shredded 1 cup chopped celery 1 medium onion, chopped 1 cup chopped carrot 2-3 peeled and diced potatoes 1 tablespoon parsley flakes 1 teaspoon salt 1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper DOUGH: 3 cups all-purpose flour 1 teaspoon salt 1/4 cup lard or butter (optional)
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Sun Staff | January 14, 2004
White chocolate by any other name might still taste as sweet. But starting this month, new federal guidelines will define what white chocolate is. In response to petitions from Hershey Foods and the Chocolate Manufacturers Association of America, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has come up with a new standard for the confection. From now on, products called white chocolate must include cocoa butter, milk solids, milk fat and sweeteners such as sugar or high-fructose corn syrup. The goal is to eliminate consumers' confusion and prevent imposters from using cheaper ingredients such as vegetable fat instead of cocoa butter.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,Special to The Sun | January 2, 2008
Betty Mathias of New Windsor was looking for a recipe for an onion casserole that was originally published in the 2006 Old Farmer's Almanac. She said she discarded the old almanac and "out with the old year went a darn good recipe." Fortunately, Linda Lupro of Baltimore held on to her copy of the 2006 almanac and kindly faxed in a copy of the recipe that Mathias was looking for. This recipe involves a lot of chopping. However, if you are careful and don't over-process, you could do most of the prep in the food processor, which would certainly be less laborious.
NEWS
By ANNETTE GOOCH and ANNETTE GOOCH,UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE | April 11, 1999
A favorite for potlucks and family suppers alike is chicken pie made entirely from scratch. A potpie -- a main-dish pie filled with poultry or meat and vegetables -- takes time to put together but can be prepared in stages, making it ideal for starting the weekend before a busy week. You can simmer the chicken and prepare the filling and pastry up to two days ahead. On the day you assemble the pie, let the filling warm almost to room temperature while you roll out the pastry topping.Chicken PieServes 61 frying chicken (3 1/2 pounds)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kathryn Higham and Kathryn Higham,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 2, 1998
Baltimore's SoBo may never be as famous as New York's SoHo, the arty area south of Houston Street, or as trendy as Miami's SoBe, the art-deco jewel of South Beach. But South Baltimore has an appeal of its own, and so does Brent Ludtke's SoBo Cafe, which opened last December in Federal Hill.It's hard not to have an immediate positive response walking into the bright and airy SoBo, with its gauzy curtains, paddle fans and sunflower-colored walls hung with bold artworks. Some are pretty funny, like Phil Wiley's surfing alien who also hangs 10 on the oversized blackboard above the wide stretch of SoBo's wooden bar.That's where the menu, which changes daily, is written in chalk.
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