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SPORTS
By Mike Miller, The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2010
When the Constellation Energy Senior Players Championship returns to Baltimore Country Club in 2011, the tournament could bring a few promotions from its one-year stop in the Washington suburbs. This year's tournament at TPC Potomac at Avenel Farm offered complimentary admission and a free concert by rock band Better Than Ezra, while charitable efforts helped generate $400,000 in donations. Tournament officials balanced the free admission with the help of corporations willing to sponsor individual rounds.
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BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2010
For years, Marylanders have been warned about the risk of blackouts as the region's growing energy needs overload the electricity grid. One solution to ease such threats has been to build several high-voltage transmission lines to ship electricity to the region, including a contentious proposal to build a line connecting West Virginia to Maryland. Called the Potomac-Appalachian Transmission Highline, that project is slowly moving forward amid regulatory hurdles and opposition from residents and environmentalists.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | July 26, 2010
Kamie Crawford, a 17-year-old from Potomac was crowned Miss Teen USA Saturday night in the Bahamas, making her the first contestant from the state of Maryland to win the distinction. Crawford, a senior at Winston Churchill High in Potomac, beat out Miss Illinois to win the title. The competition was held at Atlantis, Paradise Island resort, in the Bahamas. She was named Miss Maryland Teen USA in November, which was her first time competing in the pageant. As a result of the win, Crawford received a two-year scholarship from the New York Film Academy worth more than $100,000, a diamond tiara, and various trips and clothes.
NEWS
By Janet Gilbert | July 10, 2010
Ten years ago, if you were to ask people my age if they liked their beverages on the rocks, they would assume you were taking their cocktail order. They would never think you were offering them a water bottle to enjoy while coursing down the Potomac River rapids on an inner tube. My, how times have changed. And not necessarily for the better. Admittedly, it was my idea to go whitewater tubing to celebrate America's birthday. I felt certain that our forefathers would have approved, because tubing is the sort of adventurous activity that George Washington would have embraced had he not been concerned with jettisoning his powdered wig and shattering his remaining teeth.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Baltimore Sun reporter | May 14, 2010
With the ease of a player moving a chess piece, a massive crane growled to life early Friday afternoon, plucked a yellow buoy off the deck, swung it over the side and gently lowered into the Potomac River. Just like that, the network of bobbing markers that broadcast air and water quality readings on the Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries to anglers, boaters, students and scientists grew by one. The eighth "smart buoy" is part of the Capt. John Smith Chesapeake National Historic Trail that commemorates the voyages of discovery carried out more than 400 years ago. The buoys are owned and maintained by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration as part of a larger system of sensors that monitor bay quality.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,don.markus@baltsun.com | November 5, 2009
The PGA Tour's decision to move next year's Constellation Energy Senior Players Championship from Baltimore Country Club in Timonium to the TPC Potomac at Avenel Farm did not surprise BCC general manager Michael Stott, but he has mixed feelings about it leaving. The move, which the tour announced Wednesday, was first broached to Stott shortly after the 2009 event ended last month. Jay Haas came from behind to beat Tom Watson at Five Farms. Stott graciously accepted the tour's decision to leave Baltimore and then return in 2011, with Constellation Energy remaining as title sponsor.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,Paul.west@baltsun.com | September 12, 2009
WASHINGTON - -The Coast Guard promised a full investigation Friday after a training exercise on the Potomac River grounded flights at Reagan National Airport amid media-fueled fears of another Sept. 11 incident. False TV reports about machine gun-equipped Coast Guard vessels firing on a suspicious craft in a security zone not far from a 9/11 commemoration at the Pentagon prompted sharp criticism of the government for staging the drill at such a sensitive moment. In turn, the White House pushed back against cable TV networks for erroneous "breaking news" reports.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,candy.thomson@baltsun.com | July 3, 2009
State fisheries biologists are trying to learn what killed hundreds of bass on the Potomac River, just days after two fishing tournaments. The fish were discovered and reported Monday by a fishing guide, a longtime opponent of the large number of tournaments held each year on the river near Smallwood State Park in Charles County. Don Cosden, chief of Inland Fisheries for the Department of Natural Resources, said biologists on the water Tuesday estimated there were 600 dead bass along with several hundred catfish and other species over a six-mile stretch of the river.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | March 20, 2009
Charles Joseph "Jeff" Croghan, a World War II B-24 tail gunner who later became a Chesapeake & Potomac Telephone Co. supervisor, died Mondayof liver failure at Stella Maris Hospice in Timonium. He was 84. Mr. Croghan was born in Baltimore and raised on McElderry Street. He was a 1942 graduate of Polytechnic Institute. He was drafted into the Army Air Forces in 1943, and after being trained as a gunner, he joined the 450th Bombardment Group of the 15th Air Force at Manduria, Italy. He was a tail gunner aboard Satan's Gal, a B-24 Liberator bomber, whose crew consisted of four officers and six enlisted men, and he flew on 50 missions over Nazi-occupied Europe from the base in Manduria.
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