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SPORTS
By Chuck Acquisto and Chuck Acquisto,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 27, 1996
With Potomac senior forward Regan Carter having her offensive way for 15 points early in the first half, Wilde Lake coach Kelly Storr knew who to turn to during a critical second-quarter timeout in last night's Class 2A South region quarterfinal.Up just 17-16, Storr employed a box-and-one defense to stop Carter and assigned Wildecats sophomore forward Bridget White (10 rebounds) the unenviable task of shadowing the Braves premier scorer (25.0 ppg).All White did was hold Carter scoreless during a critical nine-minute juncture that saw Wilde Lake eventually build a 16-point second-half lead.
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SPORTS
By Rich Scherr and Rich Scherr,Special to The Sun | September 11, 1994
OXON HILL -- McDonogh quarterback Bobby Sabelhaus said he was confident that the top-ranked Eagles could get their highly touted passing game into high gear yesterday against host Potomac of Prince George's County.But with one ill-advised passing play, that offense and McDonogh's dream of a second straight perfect season both came to a crashing halt.After marching most of the way back from a 19-point first-half deficit and being poised to take the lead early in the fourth quarter, McDonogh threw away its chances for victory when receiver Jason Taylor's option pass was picked off and returned for a touchdown, giving the Braves a 25-14 lead that held up as the final score.
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | January 15, 2000
Opponents of the development of National Harbor on the shores of the Potomac in Prince George's County have played their trump card, sending "notice of intent to sue" the developer over wrecking bald eagle habitat on the property. The formal notice, sent Thursday to developer Milton V. Peterson, says that he violated the Endangered Species Act when one of his employees cut down a cherry tree that held a bald eagle's nest on the 534-acre tract south of the Woodrow Wilson Memorial Bridge.
SPORTS
By Lonny Weaver and Lonny Weaver,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 10, 1996
March is probably the best time for Carroll fishing fans to catch a tiger muskellunge from the nearby Potomac River. You will find them at the mouths of the larger feeder streams and rivers that flow into the Potomac as these sharp-toothed trophies feed on suckers.Maryland began stocking hybrid tiger muskies in the mid and upper Potomac in 1989 by crossing male northern pike with female true muskellunge. The result is an extremely aggressive fish of large size with little or no reproductive capacity.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith and C. Fraser Smith,Sun Staff Correspondent | February 17, 1991
POTOMAC -- The view from Mitch and Bill's Exxon in these days of economic distress includes an occasional hint of trouble in this wealthy enclave, the telling of a worrisome tale usually involving exotic cars.When the Jaguars and the BMWs and the Ferraris pull in to fill up, the driver is likely to be Ted Koppel or Sugar Ray Leonard or the actress Linda Carter or Arnold Schwarzenegger or a big-time Capitol Hill lobbyist.Under a proposal still pending in Annapolis, automobiles would be hit with a 2 percent personal property tax. For the cars driven by these celebrities -- Mr. Koppel drives a fire-engine-red Mercedes 500, according to station owner Mike Mitchell -- that tax would be hefty.
SPORTS
By Pat O'Malley and Pat O'Malley,Staff Writer | November 14, 1993
OXON HILL -- In a game pitting two teams making their first playoff appearances, No. 7 Southern (10-1) held on for a 14-12 Class 2A quarterfinal victory over Potomac (9-2) of Prince George's County.With the win, fifth seed Southern will play host to eighth seed Dunbar on Friday in Harwood in the semifinals. No. 12 Dunbar (9-2) was a 22-10 victor over No. 4 Overlea (10-1) on Friday night.Yesterday, it was speed against power as Southern jumped out to an early 14-0 lead.B. J. Summers (20-for-123 rushing)
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,Staff Writer | April 11, 1993
The Potomac River, to this point, seems to have escaped the recent diesel-fuel spill on Sugarland Run with minimal damage to its fish and wildlife, according to Ken Penrod, a bass guide and conservation chairman for the Maryland B.A.S.S. Federation.Penrod, who spends virtually every day between late March anNovember on the Potomac guiding bass fishing parties orparticipating in volunteer work with state and federal fisheries groups, said that by Thursday there was little remaining evidence of the spill below Little Falls near Washington.
SPORTS
By Bill Burton | April 12, 1991
WASHINGTON -- I knew he was my kind of guy when I climbed aboard his wooden boat. Securely tied in a yellow nylon rope at the bow was a big boulder.It was his anchor. Why use a real one and challenge the rocky bottom of the Potomac, which claims them by the hundreds? That's country reasoning; my kind of thinking.No outboard at the stern, but there was a pair of oars. He grabbed both and rowed into the Potomac. I couldn't recall the last time I rode a rowboat that lived up to its name.The current was swift, but at the "controls" was a river rat with strong arms.
NEWS
By Alex Gordon and Alex Gordon,SUN STAFF | July 21, 1996
The Howard County Board of Appeals has unanimously approved a zoning petition by Potomac Airgas to relocate its main production facility from Arbutus to the Baltimore-Washington Industrial Park in Jessup, bringing its 60 workers to the county.The Thursday night decision paves the way for the company to complete the move by next summer, said President Chuck Leggett.Leggett also said that the company will retain its existing staff.Potomac Airgas, a subsidiary of Airgas Inc. of Radnor, Pa., which vTC manufactures and stores gases such as acetylene and carbon dioxide for industrial and medical purposes, had received endorsement for relocation from the Howard County Planning Board earlier this month.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON and CANDUS THOMSON,SUN REPORTER | August 9, 2006
MARBURY -- All the green these days on the Potomac River isn't grass beds and lily pads. Two major bass fishing tournaments are hitting the "nation's river," this weekend and next week, with nearly $500,000 in cash and prizes at stake. Both will be staged out of Charles County's Smallwood State Park. First up is the Capitol Clash, the penultimate event on the 11-tournament Bassmaster Elite Series that will help determine who wins Angler of the Year honors and cement the field for February's Bassmaster Classic.
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