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SPORTS
By Rich Scherr and Rich Scherr,Special to The Sun | September 11, 1994
OXON HILL -- McDonogh quarterback Bobby Sabelhaus said he was confident that the top-ranked Eagles could get their highly touted passing game into high gear yesterday against host Potomac of Prince George's County.But with one ill-advised passing play, that offense and McDonogh's dream of a second straight perfect season both came to a crashing halt.After marching most of the way back from a 19-point first-half deficit and being poised to take the lead early in the fourth quarter, McDonogh threw away its chances for victory when receiver Jason Taylor's option pass was picked off and returned for a touchdown, giving the Braves a 25-14 lead that held up as the final score.
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NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | January 15, 2000
Opponents of the development of National Harbor on the shores of the Potomac in Prince George's County have played their trump card, sending "notice of intent to sue" the developer over wrecking bald eagle habitat on the property. The formal notice, sent Thursday to developer Milton V. Peterson, says that he violated the Endangered Species Act when one of his employees cut down a cherry tree that held a bald eagle's nest on the 534-acre tract south of the Woodrow Wilson Memorial Bridge.
SPORTS
By Pat O'Malley and Pat O'Malley,Staff Writer | November 14, 1993
OXON HILL -- In a game pitting two teams making their first playoff appearances, No. 7 Southern (10-1) held on for a 14-12 Class 2A quarterfinal victory over Potomac (9-2) of Prince George's County.With the win, fifth seed Southern will play host to eighth seed Dunbar on Friday in Harwood in the semifinals. No. 12 Dunbar (9-2) was a 22-10 victor over No. 4 Overlea (10-1) on Friday night.Yesterday, it was speed against power as Southern jumped out to an early 14-0 lead.B. J. Summers (20-for-123 rushing)
SPORTS
By Lonny Weaver and Lonny Weaver,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 10, 1996
March is probably the best time for Carroll fishing fans to catch a tiger muskellunge from the nearby Potomac River. You will find them at the mouths of the larger feeder streams and rivers that flow into the Potomac as these sharp-toothed trophies feed on suckers.Maryland began stocking hybrid tiger muskies in the mid and upper Potomac in 1989 by crossing male northern pike with female true muskellunge. The result is an extremely aggressive fish of large size with little or no reproductive capacity.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Western Maryland Bureau of The Sun | August 3, 1995
OLDTOWN -- State officials closed yesterday the Oldtown Toll Bridge, the only privately owned toll bridge in Maryland and one of few in the United States, because of safety concerns.The 58-year-old wooden span, which links Oldtown with Green Spring, W. Va., across the north branch of the Potomac River, was closed because of "serious structural deficiencies" resulting from age and constant pressure from the river's flow, said Joseph Walter, chief engineer for the Maryland Public Service Commission.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith and C. Fraser Smith,Sun Staff Correspondent | February 17, 1991
POTOMAC -- The view from Mitch and Bill's Exxon in these days of economic distress includes an occasional hint of trouble in this wealthy enclave, the telling of a worrisome tale usually involving exotic cars.When the Jaguars and the BMWs and the Ferraris pull in to fill up, the driver is likely to be Ted Koppel or Sugar Ray Leonard or the actress Linda Carter or Arnold Schwarzenegger or a big-time Capitol Hill lobbyist.Under a proposal still pending in Annapolis, automobiles would be hit with a 2 percent personal property tax. For the cars driven by these celebrities -- Mr. Koppel drives a fire-engine-red Mercedes 500, according to station owner Mike Mitchell -- that tax would be hefty.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,Staff Writer | April 11, 1993
The Potomac River, to this point, seems to have escaped the recent diesel-fuel spill on Sugarland Run with minimal damage to its fish and wildlife, according to Ken Penrod, a bass guide and conservation chairman for the Maryland B.A.S.S. Federation.Penrod, who spends virtually every day between late March anNovember on the Potomac guiding bass fishing parties orparticipating in volunteer work with state and federal fisheries groups, said that by Thursday there was little remaining evidence of the spill below Little Falls near Washington.
SPORTS
By Rich Scherr and Rich Scherr,Contributing Writer | March 18, 1993
COLLEGE PARK -- Second-ranked Southern began this season in an uncharacteristically slow fashion, winning four of its first seven games.Yesterday, however, in the state Class 3A title game against Potomac of Prince George's County, the Bulldogs ended it in a blur.Southern used intense pressure to create fast-break opportunities, breaking open a close game in the third-quarter and coasting to a 70-57 win at Cole Field House.The victory was the Bulldogs' 13th straight, and 17th in their final 19 games.
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Staff Writer | June 24, 1992
James Grafton Gore pleaded guilty in U.S. District Court in Baltimore yesterday to cutting more than 20 mature, government-owned trees near his Potomac home in 1988.Authorities had charged in criminal and civil complaints that the Gore family cut the trees to get a better view of the Potomac River and to improve their satellite television reception.Mr. Gore pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor charge of destruction of trees on lands reserved for public use. He could receive a maximum penalty of one year in jail and $100,000 in fines when he is sentenced before District Judge Frederic N. Smalkin Sept.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Staff Writer | March 13, 1993
And now, some good news about the environment.While many species of plants and animals are vanishing, a new freshwater fish has been "discovered" in the cold, rushing waters of streams that feed the Potomac River in western Maryland.Only a handful of new fish are found each year around the world, so spotting one in a densely populated state is remarkable.Richard Raesly, a biologist at Frostburg State University, identified the bizarre-looking member of the sculpin family, a fish with a big, flat head and upward-gazing eyes.
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