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NEWS
May 28, 2004
A fisherman has caught another northern snakehead fish in the Potomac River in Virginia, state officials announced yesterday, marking the fourth time this spring that the voracious Asian invader has turned up in the river. A commercial waterman caught the 14 1/2 -inch, 1-pound fish near Fort Belvoir, in the same eight-mile stretch where the other snakeheads were caught. A Maryland Department of Natural Resources biologist confirmed that it was a female northern snakehead and was about 2 years old. A multiagency effort is under way to determine if the fish has established itself here.
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SPORTS
By Rich Scherr and Rich Scherr,Contributing Writer | December 18, 1993
For seventh-ranked Walbrook, last night's game in the Function at the Junction Mixer at Coppin State was supposed to provide the ultimate test.The Warriors were facing a Potomac team that not only had advanced to the Class 3A state finals the last two seasons, but also had the height to shut off Walbrook's inside game.It took the Warriors awhile to make adjustments, but the ones they made propelled them to a 53-50 overtime win."They were bigger than us and they were blocking our shots, so we had to force them out of the zone," said Walbrook's Travone Broadway, who led his team with 13 points.
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | January 15, 2000
Opponents of the development of National Harbor on the shores of the Potomac in Prince George's County have played their trump card, sending "notice of intent to sue" the developer over wrecking bald eagle habitat on the property. The formal notice, sent Thursday to developer Milton V. Peterson, says that he violated the Endangered Species Act when one of his employees cut down a cherry tree that held a bald eagle's nest on the 534-acre tract south of the Woodrow Wilson Memorial Bridge.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Western Maryland Bureau of The Sun | August 3, 1995
OLDTOWN -- State officials closed yesterday the Oldtown Toll Bridge, the only privately owned toll bridge in Maryland and one of few in the United States, because of safety concerns.The 58-year-old wooden span, which links Oldtown with Green Spring, W. Va., across the north branch of the Potomac River, was closed because of "serious structural deficiencies" resulting from age and constant pressure from the river's flow, said Joseph Walter, chief engineer for the Maryland Public Service Commission.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith and C. Fraser Smith,Sun Staff Correspondent | February 17, 1991
POTOMAC -- The view from Mitch and Bill's Exxon in these days of economic distress includes an occasional hint of trouble in this wealthy enclave, the telling of a worrisome tale usually involving exotic cars.When the Jaguars and the BMWs and the Ferraris pull in to fill up, the driver is likely to be Ted Koppel or Sugar Ray Leonard or the actress Linda Carter or Arnold Schwarzenegger or a big-time Capitol Hill lobbyist.Under a proposal still pending in Annapolis, automobiles would be hit with a 2 percent personal property tax. For the cars driven by these celebrities -- Mr. Koppel drives a fire-engine-red Mercedes 500, according to station owner Mike Mitchell -- that tax would be hefty.
SPORTS
By Pat O'Malley and Pat O'Malley,Staff Writer | November 14, 1993
OXON HILL -- In a game pitting two teams making their first playoff appearances, No. 7 Southern (10-1) held on for a 14-12 Class 2A quarterfinal victory over Potomac (9-2) of Prince George's County.With the win, fifth seed Southern will play host to eighth seed Dunbar on Friday in Harwood in the semifinals. No. 12 Dunbar (9-2) was a 22-10 victor over No. 4 Overlea (10-1) on Friday night.Yesterday, it was speed against power as Southern jumped out to an early 14-0 lead.B. J. Summers (20-for-123 rushing)
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,Staff Writer | April 11, 1993
The Potomac River, to this point, seems to have escaped the recent diesel-fuel spill on Sugarland Run with minimal damage to its fish and wildlife, according to Ken Penrod, a bass guide and conservation chairman for the Maryland B.A.S.S. Federation.Penrod, who spends virtually every day between late March anNovember on the Potomac guiding bass fishing parties orparticipating in volunteer work with state and federal fisheries groups, said that by Thursday there was little remaining evidence of the spill below Little Falls near Washington.
SPORTS
By Rich Scherr and Rich Scherr,Contributing Writer | March 18, 1993
COLLEGE PARK -- Second-ranked Southern began this season in an uncharacteristically slow fashion, winning four of its first seven games.Yesterday, however, in the state Class 3A title game against Potomac of Prince George's County, the Bulldogs ended it in a blur.Southern used intense pressure to create fast-break opportunities, breaking open a close game in the third-quarter and coasting to a 70-57 win at Cole Field House.The victory was the Bulldogs' 13th straight, and 17th in their final 19 games.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Staff Writer | March 25, 1992
State environmental officials yesterday relaxed their warning about eating fish caught in the upper Potomac River, saying there have been "substantial decreases" in dioxin contamination downstream from the Westvaco Corp. paper mill in Luke.The move was immediately criticized by environmentalists, who contend that Maryland's limits on dioxin, a suspected human carcinogen, are too lax.Citing new sampling results, the Maryland Department of the Environment dropped its nearly 2-year-old advice to limit consumption of bass and most other surface-feeding sport fish caught in the 40-mile stretch of the Potomac between Luke and Paw Paw, W.Va.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Joel McCord and Lyle Denniston and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | February 19, 2000
WASHINGTON -- The commonwealth of Virginia asked the U.S. Supreme Court yesterday to order the state of Maryland to clear the way for a project to draw drinking water for Virginians from the Potomac River above Washington. In a lawsuit filed directly with the justices, bypassing lower courts, Virginia argued that Maryland officials are insisting illegally on veto power over a water intake tube that would extend beyond Virginia's shore to the Potomac's main channel. Maryland owns the river under a 1632 land grant from King Charles I and has jurisdiction over construction projects that affect it. The ownership was upheld by an arbitration award approved by Congress in 1879.
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