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By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2013
An Odenton man who drowned in the Potomac River on Labor Day has been identified, Montgomery County police said. Mark Moore, 22, was identified by police on Friday. Search crews were called on Monday night for a possible drowning at the to Potomac River near the Great Falls overlook, police said. Montgomery County Fire Rescue recovered the body in the water on Thursday. Moore was pronounced dead at the scene. Police said he had been sitting in the water near the shore with friends when he decided to wade farther into the river when he was swept downriver.
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NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | June 15, 2014
A multi-agency, multi-day search for a Potomac River kayaker was called off on Sunday after it was determined he had simply ditched his kayak and gone home — "oblivious" to the fact that authorities became alarmed after finding his kayak floating upside down. The Montgomery County Police Department first requested the public's help on Friday in identifying the owner of the abandoned kayak, which was near the Anglers Inn boat ramp south of Great Falls. Earlier in the day, witnesses at the Great Falls observation deck had reported seeing a man in the kayak, and told police that it had "appeared that he may have needed assistance.
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NEWS
By Martin Weil and and Maggie Fazeli Fard, The Washington Post | August 5, 2013
From the banks of the Potomac River, in a region steeped in American history, a massive fossil was dug up last month that apparently can be traced back to a time long before this country's recorded history, a time deep in the world's prehistory. The fossil is the skull of a whale that is "approximately 15 million years old," said John Nance, the paleontology collections manager at the Calvert Marine Museum in Southern Maryland. The skull is about 6 feet long and is believed to weigh about 1,000 pounds.
SPORTS
From Sun staff reports | June 14, 2014
Evinrude pro angler Scott Martin knows from experience what to expect from the Rayovac FLW Series Northern Division stop on the Potomac River in Marbury on June 19-21, and he has high expectations. "My favorite thing about the Potomac is that you have a lot of fishable water," said Martin, who won a Walmart FLW Tour event there in 2012. "The whole river is good. This time of the year the fish will be postspawn and it will fish really similar to how I won two years ago. Everything is a little behind schedule this year, though.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | August 19, 1999
POTOMAC -- Environmental and political leaders in Montgomery County warned yesterday that a regional water agreement might be adequate for people but deadly for animals.Standing in the dry bed of Muddy Branch creek, 100 yards from the Potomac River, County Executive Douglas M. Duncan called yesterday for a study to determine whether an 18-year-old pact among Maryland, Virginia and the District of Columbia protects wildlife."Is this environment for us and nothing else, or is it for the ecosystem, too?"
SPORTS
By Bill Burton | September 24, 1991
CHICAMUXEN -- Guide Glenn Peacock's stock in trade is the largemouth bass. On this fish he has established a fine business practically year 'round on the Potomac River near Washington, also a reputation good enough to rate a booking by George Bush.But these days Peacock's mind wanders from the green fish he loves to challenge with soft plastic baits. Now sharing his thoughts and anticipations are the bigger silver-finned creatures with the black stripes. Rockfish.Come Oct. 5, Peacock and his clientele will enjoy the best of both worlds -- bass on slack, low, and in-between waters; rockfish on high waters, the higher the better.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith | July 27, 2008
A brief anecdote illustrates the shift of political power in Maryland away from Baltimore and south toward Prince George's and Montgomery counties. Several years go, while a large equestrian center opened in his district outside Upper Marlboro, I suggested to state Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller (in jest) that it was illegal to pour that much concrete outside Baltimore. "Yeah, right," he said. Until around then, most of the big public works projects in Maryland - a convention center, a world trade tower, the subway, a concert hall and an aquarium - had been built in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,Sun Reporter | February 21, 2007
More than 40,000 yellow perch have washed up along a four-mile stretch of the Potomac River in Southern Maryland. The cause of the fish kill is not known, but the Maryland Department of the Environment is investigating whether the recent cold snap might have played a role, said Robert Ballinger, a spokesman. The location, between Swan Point and Morgantown in Charles County, is near a power plant, but investigators have concluded that it was not responsible, Ballinger said. "We are looking to a wide range of possible causes, from the cold snap to wind gusts to fishermen," he said.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | August 31, 1998
The two men killed Saturday when their light plane crashed into the Potomac River were identified as military flight instructors, authorities from Quantico Marine Corps Base said yesterday.The pilots, Robert S. Blassic, 72, a retired Navy commander from Bealeton, Va.; and Air Force Capt. Michael E. Huntington, 33, of Fairborn, Ohio, were killed about 1: 30 p.m. shortly after they took off from the base. They were not on a military mission."They were operating in a civilian capacity," base spokesman Bradley Gordon said.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | February 28, 1994
Sheathed in a layer of black rubber to avoid sonar detection, the German World War II U-boat known as the Black Panther served as a model of hit-and-run efficiency, always able to evade Allied counter strikes thanks to clever German engineering.That same U-boat now sits dead on the floor of the Potomac River near Piney Point, a victim of U.S. experimentation and study that scuttled the submarine in 1949.Yet efforts to bring life to the sunken U-1105 are under way as Maryland state officials work with the Navy to develop the country's first underwater diving park featuring a sunken WWII vessel.
SPORTS
From Sun staff reports | May 18, 2014
The Maryland Natural Resources Police has issued a warning to boaters and anglers to avoid the Upper Potomac River, including its swollen creeks and streams, through Monday. The advisory, issued Friday and based on information received from the National Weather Service and the Maryland Emergency Management Agency, covers the river from Cumberland to Great Falls. It could be extended Monday afternoon, if necessary. The water levels pose a threat to non white-water vessels, tubers, anglers and other recreational users and are caused by wave action, water velocity and treacherous currents.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | May 11, 2014
- With oysters showing signs of revival in the Chesapeake Bay, some are trying to bring the bivalves back in the bay's second largest tributary, the Potomac River. Just two years into their fledgling effort to restore the river's once-bountiful oyster population, however, organizers are raising alarms about a large marina proposed in Charles County near the Potomac's largest and formerly most productive oyster bar. The 143-slip marina would provide berths for residents and guests of a 900-acre resort community planned on the waterfront here.
EXPLORE
Letter to The Aegis | September 30, 2013
Editor: Reading the Wednesday issue of The Aegis (9/23/2013) the letter written by Alison Prost was highly expected, as she missed so many points, namely one that most of the Chesapeake Bay's pollution is filtering down from points north like Pennsylvania, which continues to heavily pollute the Susquehanna River Basin as well the other states that pour heavy pollution into the Potomac River. Please note that both the Susquehanna and the Potomac flow into the Bay so Maryland is entirely responsible for not even 30 percent of the pollution.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2013
An Odenton man who drowned in the Potomac River on Labor Day has been identified, Montgomery County police said. Mark Moore, 22, was identified by police on Friday. Search crews were called on Monday night for a possible drowning at the to Potomac River near the Great Falls overlook, police said. Montgomery County Fire Rescue recovered the body in the water on Thursday. Moore was pronounced dead at the scene. Police said he had been sitting in the water near the shore with friends when he decided to wade farther into the river when he was swept downriver.
NEWS
By Martin Weil and and Maggie Fazeli Fard, The Washington Post | August 5, 2013
From the banks of the Potomac River, in a region steeped in American history, a massive fossil was dug up last month that apparently can be traced back to a time long before this country's recorded history, a time deep in the world's prehistory. The fossil is the skull of a whale that is "approximately 15 million years old," said John Nance, the paleontology collections manager at the Calvert Marine Museum in Southern Maryland. The skull is about 6 feet long and is believed to weigh about 1,000 pounds.
SPORTS
Sports Digest | June 23, 2013
        Fishing Deale's Schmitt wins EverStart on Potomac Bryan Schmitt of Deale won the EverStart Series Northern Division tournament on the Potomac River on Saturday. Schmitt won with a three-day weigh-in total of 52 pounds, 8 ounces with 15 bass. His third-day weigh-in was 16 pounds, 2 ounces. Schmitt was awarded $37,554 for his victory, which he attributed to a grassy area on the Potomac that he recently found using his depth finder. College tournament: Shippensburg University's team won the college portion of the competition.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | March 17, 2012
On New Year's Eve, Shawn Wetzel went from his home near Gettysburg, Pa., down to his favorite fishing spot on the Potomac River at Fort Washington Marina. Wetzel, who goes there every weekend, has caught around seven catfish weighing more than 60pounds each over the past two years. Then on New Year's Eve he reeled in one that he weighed in at a little more than 79 pounds. It would have broken the Maryland record for blue catfish, except for one small problem. "Being a holiday, there was nobody [from the Department of Natural Resources]
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | October 13, 1999
GLEN ECHO -- Little Falls Dam on the Potomac River, built to help supply metropolitan Washington with drinking water, has kept American shad from reaching its prime spawning waters for 40 years.Yesterday, state and federal officials knocked a hole in the dam, ceremonially speaking.Bruce Babbitt, U.S. secretary of the interior, joined Gov. Parris N. Glendening, Democratic Sen. Paul S. Sarbanes, Republican Rep. Constance A. Morella and others to celebrate the beginning of work on a notch in the dam that will allow shad, striped bass, sturgeon and perch to reach their historic spawning grounds in the 10-mile stretch north of the dam.Work on the 1,400-foot dam, upstream from the District of Columbia, marks another step in a national campaign to remove obsolete dams that stand in the way of fish that live most of their lives in salt water but migrate up freshwater rivers to reproduce.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | June 19, 2013
The National Weather Service said a tornado crossed much of southern St. Mary's County during Thursday afternoon storms -- the second twister confirmed in the state that day and the second in four days for St. Mary's. A tornado classified as an EF-0 on the Enhanced Fujita scale, with 75 mph winds, traveled nearly 14 miles from the Oakley area to California and the Patuxent River from 3:24 p.m. to 3:42 p.m. Thursday. Weather service officials came to that conclusion after surveying damage and with help from radar at both Andrews Air Force Base and the weather service's Baltimore/Washington forecast office in Sterling, Va. A public information statement from the weather service reads: "DAMAGE WAS INTERMITTENT ALONG THE PATH AND WAS CONFINED TO TREE DAMAGE AND DAMAGE RESULTING FROM DOWNED TREES.
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