Advertisement
HomeCollectionsPotluck
IN THE NEWS

Potluck

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
By Liz F. Kay | July 1, 2011
How do you feel about potluck invitations? Potlucks are often recommended as a way to keep entertainment costs in check. If everyone brings a little something, then no single person is footing the bill. It seems like the concept of "bring a dish to share" is pretty popular --- according to an American Express survey of more than 2,000 people, about 72 percent of consumers will ask their guests to contribute a side dish, dessert or drinks. As an infrequent host, I love potlucks, just because it often takes so much effort to get my house in guest-worthy state that I welcome any means to ease the cooking burden as well.
ARTICLES BY DATE
EXPLORE
January 2, 2013
On Dec. 9, the Blue Ribbon 4-H Club wrapped gifts they purchased and collected food for the family they adopted this Christmas. The Hilyard family hosted the annual party, which included a potluck dinner and member gift exchange.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Sun reporter | November 7, 2007
Crowd-Pleasing Potluck By Francine Halvorsen Park Avenue Potluck By Florence Fabricant and the Society of Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center Rizzoli / 2007 / $35 Peek inside the recipe boxes of some of New York's society mavens, many of whom donated their recipes to this book. For those of us cooking in Baltimore, it's a comfort to know that the upper crust of the Big Apple aren't serving potluck dinners much different from ours (although they do seem to have nicer silverware).
BUSINESS
By Liz F. Kay | July 1, 2011
How do you feel about potluck invitations? Potlucks are often recommended as a way to keep entertainment costs in check. If everyone brings a little something, then no single person is footing the bill. It seems like the concept of "bring a dish to share" is pretty popular --- according to an American Express survey of more than 2,000 people, about 72 percent of consumers will ask their guests to contribute a side dish, dessert or drinks. As an infrequent host, I love potlucks, just because it often takes so much effort to get my house in guest-worthy state that I welcome any means to ease the cooking burden as well.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | August 2, 1995
Until recently, I had not able to work up much ardor for summer squash.It was just another vegetable in the market. It was not as well known as zucchini. And with its crooked neck, and bright yellow skin, it was not good-looking. What changed my attitude toward summer squash was proximity. Many summer squash moved into our home. They filled up bowls that were supposed to hold fruit. They stretched out on kitchen counters. They sunned themselves in the back yard.This invasion of the summer squash was similar to the zucchini influx that had visited the household a few weeks earlier.
FEATURES
By Ginger Mudd Galvez and Ginger Mudd Galvez,Contributing Writer | November 1, 1992
In these economically stressed times, many Baltimoreans are finding their passion for entertaining dampened by the state of their finances. Not everyone is willing to forgo their parties, however. In fact, some think that you never need the gaiety and lift of seeing friends more than in a recession. For starters, everyone can commiserate about job security -- or the lack of it -- over the clam dip.But the problem remains: how to keep entertaining without declaring personal bankruptcy? For many people, an old-fashioned idea, thoroughly out of style during the opulent '80s, makes sense again.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,SUN STAFF | November 24, 1997
For a holiday feast like this, the turkey should give thanks.A bounty of vegetables, breads and potatoes crammed the buffet table yesterday at St. John's United Methodist Church in Baltimore's Charles Village. The dessert table offered pumpkin pie and other sweet temptations. It was Thanksgiving dinner with all the trimmings -- but without the bird.This was the Vegetarian Resource Group's 16th annual pre-Thanksgiving potluck dinner, a cholesterol-free affair where health food disciples and meat-is-murder moralists broke bread and marked the season of giving.
EXPLORE
January 2, 2013
On Dec. 9, the Blue Ribbon 4-H Club wrapped gifts they purchased and collected food for the family they adopted this Christmas. The Hilyard family hosted the annual party, which included a potluck dinner and member gift exchange.
FEATURES
By Peter D. Franklin and Peter D. Franklin,Universal Press Syndicate | February 16, 1994
Y'all listen up now, y'hear? If you been hankerin' for a heap of good eatin', then saddle up and head on out and rope you a copy of "Texas Home Cooking" by Cheryl Alters Jamison and Bill Jamison (Harvard Common Press, $14.95).This hefty, 594-page volume celebrates "down-home American eats," the authors write. The melting-pot heritage of Texans has created "a delightful culinary legacy that's still as lively as a fiddle tune and as lingering as a slow dance at the prom.""Texas Home Cooking," with its more than 400 recipes and its colorful tales (not all of them "tall")
BUSINESS
By Anne Lauren Henslee and Anne Lauren Henslee,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 24, 2002
It's 8 o'clock on a Friday night, and things are reasonably quiet in Mount Vernon. Early evening traffic has subsided, and the glow of streetlights casts a timeless quality to the historic rowhouses along St. Paul Street. Meanwhile, inside one of the 19th-century homes, a crowd of 50 homeowners compares notes on tax credits, renovation plans and everyday life. Hostess and longtime resident Eva Higgins smiles as she adorns the dining room table with various baked goods, simultaneously clearing empty dishes and remnants from the previous course.
FEATURES
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | January 12, 2008
My friends all love to entertain, but, like me, they work full time and are often dealing with frenetic schedules. The solution for all of us has become the "planned potluck." We have found that discussing the menu and delegating who will be responsible for the main course, the sides and the dessert make for a winning formula. In our circle, the person who hosts usually prepares the entree, and the rest of us bring other fare to complete the meal. As soon as I accepted a recent invitation, I volunteered to make a side dish.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Sun reporter | November 7, 2007
Crowd-Pleasing Potluck By Francine Halvorsen Park Avenue Potluck By Florence Fabricant and the Society of Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center Rizzoli / 2007 / $35 Peek inside the recipe boxes of some of New York's society mavens, many of whom donated their recipes to this book. For those of us cooking in Baltimore, it's a comfort to know that the upper crust of the Big Apple aren't serving potluck dinners much different from ours (although they do seem to have nicer silverware).
FEATURES
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | March 17, 2007
When some of our friends (whose lineage is Irish) discovered that St. Patrick's Day fell on a Saturday this year, they didn't waste any time planning a party. By the time I received their e-mail, they had decided on a Shamrock Potluck. Since my family's ancestry includes some Irish genes, I was equally enthusiastic about being part of a casual get-together to celebrate this holiday. I also knew exactly what I would volunteer to make. For the past six months, I have been working on a soup cookbook, and one dish I have wanted to create for the collection is a corned beef and cabbage potage.
FEATURES
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | February 10, 2007
Whenever I am invited to a potluck, I instinctively offer to make dessert, but recently, when a good friend mentioned that she'd like to have us over for such a supper, I volunteered to bring a vegetable. I did this because I was anxious to try a new dish one of my enthusiastic assistants had developed. The recipe was for a sweet potato gratin, which had been fashioned after a similar dish I had created using Yukon Gold potatoes and creme fraiche. My talented helper, Emily Bell, had replaced the white spuds with sweet potatoes, and used rosemary in place of thyme as a seasoning.
FEATURES
By BETTY ROSBOTTOM and BETTY ROSBOTTOM,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | January 14, 2006
My women's investment club has morphed into a book club. After a decade of poring over stock reports and dutifully keeping abreast of business news, we're calling it quits. Although we made a few blockbuster purchases along the way, when the final tally was in, we barely broke even. If our investing skills were not stellar, our social skills were. The highlight of our meetings was always the time we spent chatting while nibbling on homemade treats. Because most of our group didn't want to give up our convivial get-togethers, we decided to change our focus to books.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 9, 2004
Labor Day at MPT diva Rhea Feikin's meant a little overtime at the gym this week for a few dozen of her closest friends. In what has become a traditional potluck party at Miss Rhea's abode, everyone brings his or her favorite "trashy" homemade dish. You know, the foods you ate in the good ol' days before things like "trans fats," "nitrates" and "carbs" became the no-nos they are today. And overindulgence becomes the word for the day. Among some of the big crowd-pleasers: Curt Decker's baked bologna, Terry Morgenthaler's "peas 'n cheese," Rita St. Clair's tuna casserole, Phil Cooper and Carol Brody's deviled eggs, Steve Ziger's meatloaf, David Morrison's fried chicken, Brian Comes and Ray Mitchener's mac and cheese, Jeff Burch and Lou Ghitlan's ham rolls, Mary Dempsey's Waldorf salad, Richard Taylor and Bill O'Brien's baked ham and Parker House rolls, and fried Spam and homemade Chex mix -- courtesy yours truly.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | January 10, 1996
This could be a big season for the neighborhood potluck party. This winter's snowstorms have cut social mobility to about a five-block radius. That means the best way to mingle with other adults, to enjoy somebody else's cooking, and generally to let off steam is to hold a neighborhood blizzard party.Recently when a big storm dumped upwards of 2 feet of snow on Baltimore and a big section of the Eastern United States, the clean-out-the-refrigerator parties began. The first night of the snow, two such parties were held in my Baltimore neighborhood.
FEATURES
By Linda Lowe Morris | July 3, 1991
On Lawyers Hill, tradition is held dear. And so for as long as anyone can remember, the Fourth of July celebration has been the same:There's the children's parade with prizes for the best costumes, a turtle race, then children's games and maybe a softball game for the older folks.And in the middle of the day, a huge potluck picnic dinner, served on two long tables in the building they call "the hall."Tomorrow will be no different. More than 100 residents and former residents of Lawyers Hill are expected.
NEWS
By Suzanne White and Suzanne White,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 17, 2003
The announcements have been sent and the sign-up sheets are posted - it's time again for the holiday potluck. After enjoying years of understated popularity at Christmas, the potluck seems to be gaining momentum as a carefree and fun way to entertain, draw people together and let them taste foods from prized family recipes and ethnic specialties throughout the year. "I'd say there's a revival of potlucks ... it's a new trend," said Maryana Vollstedt, author of The Big Book of Potluck, whose cookbook features a smorgasbord of easy-to-prepare and serve dishes and a blueprint for planning the perfect potluck party.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Special to the Sun | March 23, 2003
When neighbors called with an invitation to a potluck supper, I asked what I might bring. The hostess replied that no one had volunteered to make dessert. Delighted to have been assigned my favorite course, I hung up the phone and began thinking of a sweet confection to take to the party. An apricot tart with a flaky golden crust and a custard filling flashed into my mind. My inspiration came from an Alsatian apple tart I had recently made. Its filling -- a rich mixture of eggs, sugar, cream, milk and sliced apples -- was delicious, but I thought the tart would be even better made with colorful, dried apricots.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.