Advertisement
HomeCollectionsPotion
IN THE NEWS

Potion

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
By Bill Free and Bill Free,SUN STAFF | October 29, 1995
Assistant coach Chuck Seivert said it was the magic potion he rubbed on the hands of all the Severna Park players and coaches before the game.Lindsey Poland said it was the tough, double-overtime loss to Old Mill last Tuesday night in the Anne Arundel County championship game.Whatever the reason, third-ranked Severna Park was an extremely focused and aggressive team yesterday and won Round III, 1-0, of a series of showdowns with No. 11 Old Mill.Round III was played for the right to advance to the quarterfinals of the Class 3A-4A East Regional tournament against unbeaten James M. Bennett (13-0)
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Evan Siple | March 12, 2012
Hampden's Alchemy may have one of the tiniest upstairs bars in Baltimore. But there are some serious, high-end cocktails being crafted in this small space. Dubbed "Potions" (see what they did there?), the cocktail menu features an extensive selection of hand-crafted and tweaked blends of traditional drinks that demonstrate a lot of care, craftsmanship and, best of all, lots of flavor. "It's fun, I love doing it. We find what's trending and give it our own twist," said bartender Matthew Ballinger.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By TIM SMITH and TIM SMITH,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | July 11, 2006
There are obvious reasons that The Sorcerer is not among the most popular Gilbert and Sullivan operettas: a creaky plot about a love potion turning a quiet English village into a sea of pressing marital intentions; a score that is more pleasant than brilliant and infectious. There are also very good reasons to ignore those flaws and give The Sorcerer a spirited go. That's what the Young Victorian Theatre Company has sensibly - and admirably - chosen to do for its 36th season of dedication to the G&S repertoire.
NEWS
By John McIntyre, The Baltimore Sun | February 28, 2011
Each week, The Sun's John McIntyre presents a moderately obscure but evocative word with which you may not be familiar — another brick to add to the wall of your working vocabulary. Use it in a sentence in a comment on his blog, You Don't say, and the best sentence will be featured next week. This week's word: PHILTRUM Here's an opportunity to become better acquainted with your own body. Touch your philtrum. It's the little furrow, common to all mammals, that runs from the nose to the upper lip. In medicine, it is called the infranasal depression, a term that lacks the romance of the older term.
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to the Sun | February 12, 1994
It's opening ceremonies night at the Olympics -- and even that usually sedate prelude has a bit of drama surrounding it, since a lot of Nancy Kerrigan watchers will be craning to see whether she feels up to making the march behind the American flag. But there's also hockey on this opening day -- and, if you're not into the Olympics, a few diversions available on cable.* "The 1994 Winter Olympic Games." (8p.m.-11 p.m., 11:35 p.m.-12:30 a.m., WBAL, Channel 11) -- The very first thing we'll see in the CBS 1994 coverage of the Olympics, the opening ceremonies, is being televised on a 10-hour delayed basis -- the better to sell it as a "prime time" event from the very start.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,Sun Staff | July 1, 2001
That flawless glow Finally, a product that lives up to its hype. When Jessica Green, a spokeswoman for Prescriptives Hmagic collection, sent us information about the company's new Body Potion loaded with promises like "the illusion of flawless, conditioned radiant skin -- instantly," we were duly skeptical. "It's amazing," she continued, this time on the phone. "Try it." So we did. She was right. Body Potion does what it says, which is act as a waterproof, liquid stocking for legs of any color.
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | June 17, 1994
Here's one difference between America and the rest of the world. In this country, the fifth game of the NBA finals is broadcast live over a major network, while the opening games of the World Cup are relegated to lesser-viewed sports cable channels. In most other countries, soccer athletes, not pro basketball teams, would be the Ready For Prime Time Players.* "The Adventures of Brisco County, Jr." (8-9 p.m., WBFF, Channel 45, and WTTG, Channel 5) -- A nice Western twist on a standard Agatha Christie plot has all the big bounty hunters gathering at a convention -- then being picked off, one by one, by a mysterious murderer.
NEWS
By John McIntyre, The Baltimore Sun | February 28, 2011
Each week, The Sun's John McIntyre presents a moderately obscure but evocative word with which you may not be familiar — another brick to add to the wall of your working vocabulary. Use it in a sentence in a comment on his blog, You Don't say, and the best sentence will be featured next week. This week's word: PHILTRUM Here's an opportunity to become better acquainted with your own body. Touch your philtrum. It's the little furrow, common to all mammals, that runs from the nose to the upper lip. In medicine, it is called the infranasal depression, a term that lacks the romance of the older term.
SPORTS
By Bill Free and Bill Free,SUN STAFF | November 14, 1995
First it was a secret magic potion. Then came the old rubber band gimmick.There seems to be no end to the psychological ploys that assistant Severna Park girls soccer coach Chuck Seivert will use to help his team win a state 3A-4A championship this season.The magic potion was rubbed on the hands of all the players before they went out and beat county rival Old Mill, 1-0, in the first round of the regionals.The rubber bands were placed on the wrists of all the girls before they beat Bowie, 2-0, in the 3A-4A semifinals at Catonsville Community College last Friday.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | March 19, 1993
If your only association with the late Charles Ludlam is Center Stage's 1991 production of his wild and crazy "Mystery of Irma Vep," then the Spotlighters' presentation of his earlier work, "Reverse Psychology," will seem rather tame.But while "Reverse Psychology" doesn't indulge in such "Irma Vep" antics as casting actors in multiple roles of both genders, it does involve a certain amount of role playing, as its title might suggest.Director Miriam Bazensky's four-member cast has fun with this, but at least on opening night, the cast seemed to be holding back a bit. Though this reviewer is a fan of understatement, Ludlam's plays demand the opposite.
NEWS
By Ron Smith | July 31, 2009
Looking at the history of runaway government spending, a disturbing pattern is readily discernible: There is never a lack of observers at a given time who understand the severity of the trouble at hand, but these people lack the power to cut costs and avert calamity. An observer at the time of Imperial Spain's unwinding more than three centuries ago commented on the failure of every attempt at real reform, writing, "Those who can will not and those who will cannot." This truism is tested time and again through history.
BUSINESS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,andrea.siegel@baltsun.com | March 1, 2009
1 Short sale The route of choice for an owner seeking to stave off foreclosure, a short sale is one in which proceeds fall short of covering what's left on the mortgage. The lender must agree to accept less than what is owed. An inability to make up the difference by selling other assets makes a short sale suited to someone at the end of his financial rope. What's in it for the lender? It's out of his hair. "The loss is absorbed by the bank," said G. Russell Donaldson, whose Crofton law practice includes a lot of short sales.
NEWS
By SCOTT CALVERT and SCOTT CALVERT,SUN FOREIGN REPORTER | August 20, 2006
PINETOWN, South Africa -- The 35-year-old high school teacher named Bheki was lucky to be alive, thanks to the free antiretroviral pills that kept his HIV in check. He felt strong and had no side effects. Life was normal, as normal as it gets with an incurable disease. Then in February, he ditched the pills and started taking a mystery potion sold here outside Durban. It is made by a former truck driver who says his late grandfather came to him in dreams with the recipe for an herbal drink that could reverse HIV's march to full-blown AIDS and death.
FEATURES
By TIM SMITH and TIM SMITH,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | July 11, 2006
There are obvious reasons that The Sorcerer is not among the most popular Gilbert and Sullivan operettas: a creaky plot about a love potion turning a quiet English village into a sea of pressing marital intentions; a score that is more pleasant than brilliant and infectious. There are also very good reasons to ignore those flaws and give The Sorcerer a spirited go. That's what the Young Victorian Theatre Company has sensibly - and admirably - chosen to do for its 36th season of dedication to the G&S repertoire.
BUSINESS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 26, 2003
A Food and Drug Administration advisory panel has endorsed competing injectable gels that combat facial wrinkles, smoothing the way for a big marketing showdown. The panel recommended Friday that the FDA approve Restylane by Medicis Pharmaceutical Corp. and Hylaform by Inamed Corp., collagen alternatives available in Europe, Canada and Mexico. The FDA typically follows its experts' advice. The gels use hyaluronic acid, a substance that naturally occurs in the skin, to plump out creases and smooth facial scars.
NEWS
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Sun Staff | August 3, 2003
It's a sure sign of affection: Brett Angstadt and Lisa Simmonds give each other a good-natured shove as they stride across the Padonia Park Club pool deck. They're both in uniform: a club-issue polo shirt for him and a regulation red bathing suit underneath shorts and sweat shirt for her. They met when Lisa, a swimming instructor and lifeguard, came to the snack bar, where Brett is grill manager, and asked for a cup of ice. "I don't drink water. I eat ice," she explains. Later, Brett and Lisa, both 19, attended a mutual friend's party.
NEWS
March 25, 2002
Maryland offenders deemed legally insane confined for treatment We are writing to correct two errors in The Sun's article "Insanity defense hard to use, Maryland experts say" (March 14). First, the article reports that a study conducted in Baltimore in 1991 showed that only eight individuals in Maryland were successful in their use of the insanity defense that year. In fact, that study was limited to cases in Baltimore City; statewide, approximately 50 individuals were found not criminally responsible (or legally "insane")
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | April 6, 1991
Every spring I have the urge to sow seeds. When the sun is warm, and the wind is gentle, I go out in the back yard and plant grass seed.I rake. I fertilize. I scatter seeds. And I keep my fingers crossed and hope that maybe this year something will make it to the seedling stage before being trampled to death.The tramplers are my children and their buddies. And as happens in families, the kids have pretty much taken over the back yard.When we moved into the house, the previous owners, a child-free couple, had the back yard looking like a photo spread in Rowhouse Beautiful Magazine.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | November 9, 2002
Convention says that most actors would rather be onstage than on-screen - you know, the smell of greasepaint, the roar of a live crowd, the thrill of getting an immediate response to your performance. But that's not Mark Redfield, a fixture on the local stage for much of the 1990s. Five years have passed since his last performance before a live audience; this summer, he completed his first movie, an adaptation of Robert Louis Stevenson's Dr. Jekyll & Mr. Hyde, for which he wears the myriad hats of actor, director, set designer, co-producer and co-screenwriter.
NEWS
March 25, 2002
Maryland offenders deemed legally insane confined for treatment We are writing to correct two errors in The Sun's article "Insanity defense hard to use, Maryland experts say" (March 14). First, the article reports that a study conducted in Baltimore in 1991 showed that only eight individuals in Maryland were successful in their use of the insanity defense that year. In fact, that study was limited to cases in Baltimore City; statewide, approximately 50 individuals were found not criminally responsible (or legally "insane")
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.